Author Topic: Coleman lantern questions  (Read 9298 times)

Offline ncjeeper

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Coleman lantern questions
« on: June 02, 2010, 04:42:46 PM »
I did a search and didnt see anything on this topic so here goes.
 I have flashlights, candles, and a generator for light sources if the power goes out. The batteries will go fast if used as a constant source of light and I only have 15 gallons of gas stored for the genny for conventional lighting. I was looking into another source of light if I was without power for an extended period of time. (We had hurricane Hugo hit here back in 1989 and was without power for 12 days.)
So I was thinking about a coleman lantern and fuel for it. There are all different types and even people that collect them so my question is what type or model # should I look for? Are the old ones better then the new ones? I see the old ones going for big bucks on E-Bay.

Offline JerseyVince

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2010, 05:01:46 PM »
What type of battery lantern do you have? If its a fluorescent lamp they do put out good light but their downside is relatively short battery life. One of the new LED lantern that is very well liked is the RAYOVAC Sportsman extreme. It puts out 300 lumen's on high and will stay on for 140 hours on low on 3 D batteries. the guys on candlepowerforum rave about it and if i didn't already have a great Coleman packaway that is only slightly less bright but lasts as long I buy it too.

the cheapest place I've seen it is batteryjunction for around $28

The last cpl years LED lanterns have come a long way as the high efficiency LED from the flashlights are making it into lanterns and runtime has improved a lot

Offline hillclimber

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2010, 05:14:40 PM »
Coleman lanterns are ok. They put out alot of light, heat, and use up alot of air. The fuel is expensive, but if you get a "dual fuel" then they will also burn gasoline.
I have 4 or 5 coleman lanterns that burn liquid fuel, some new, some old. They're all about the same IMHO. We also have a Coleman that runs on propane, and it's less dangerous.
I find it's much easier for the wife and kids than the liquid fuel models that need to be pumped up.
If you want my opinion, I'd get some regular kerosene lamps. We use them more than any other backup lighting. I'd stay away from the metal "railroad style" lanterns, unless they're for outside. The regular glass lamps are great. If You use lamp oil instead of kerosene they smell more like a candle. This is because it has more parafin.

Offline Pathfinder

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2010, 05:16:40 PM »
You don't get as much light from these, but try oil lamps. They do put out a lot of light for their size, most of the modern fuels do not smoke, and they are a lot cheaper than the colemans.

Offline ncjeeper

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2010, 05:54:42 PM »
HMM. I didn't think about oil or kerosene lamps. They maybe the better way to go. I already have kerosene stored for my heater.
How safe are they? You always see in the movies a lamp getting knocked over and the house burns down.

Offline drthumbs

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2010, 06:29:00 PM »
Another idea is to get about 5 or 6 solar powered yard light.  The cheap one run $3-$4 each.  Put them up and don't remove the plastic pull tabs.   When you need them, pull themout of storage, put them out durring the day and bring them in at night. They will not provide a lot of light (you might be surprised), but it is plenty to get around the house and they will last most, if not all of the night.

When you need more light, you can then use you flashlight, lantern, or other light source.  That way you get the light you need when you need it and not waist it when you don't.


More expensive one will put out more light, and you may decide you don't need that many or you may want more.

Offline JGreene

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2010, 06:36:47 PM »
HMM. I didn't think about oil or kerosene lamps. They maybe the better way to go. I already have kerosene stored for my heater.
How safe are they? You always see in the movies a lamp getting knocked over and the house burns down.

I have 4 of these, look at yards sales they go for $2 - $5 a piece.   I have one Coleman also.  diversify :)
I do need a gallon or so of oil, yea, they'll burn Kero, but if its for a few hours, I'd rather use oil and not hear the crap about it stinkin up the house.  After a day, nobody will care if Kero does smell a bit.

Offline phargolf

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2010, 06:45:02 PM »
Coleman's are great and put out a lot of light and HEAT- a real negative here in the south, since most of our power outages are due to storms in the hotter months.  I love the new Stanley Tripod LED  lights, use only 3 AA;s, have a swivel head, and are very stable with the tripod out. Just an old geezers .02

Offline Beetle

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2010, 06:47:41 PM »
  I have 80 gallons of coleman fuel stored for about 10 lanterns and have never paid a penny for the fuel and most of the lanterns. It's amazing how many people give  them away. Check garage sales for old lanterns, the older the better. I have had to spend money on mantles though. Mantles are usually only a couple bucks  and last as long as you don't bump them to much. I was going to try an experiment and see if some silk could be fashioned into mantles.
  I like the Coleman brand, but I have an old Thermos brand from Vietnam era that is awesome. I think Coleman lanterns throw out way more light than kerosene do.

Offline ncjeeper

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2010, 09:12:43 PM »
Thanks for all the replies.

Offline JoshRonin

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2010, 09:50:54 PM »
I have two colemans that my dad has given me.  I remember using them both while camping as a kid.  One is the classic two mantle liquid fuel type.  I really like this one.  It is fairly easy to light up and gives a good amount of light.  We also have a battery one, with 2 lights.  I remember it being really bright as a kid, but now its not as good. 

I have been wondering if anyone has gotten one of the coleman stormbeam crank lanterns?  I've been wanting a 3rd lantern and having one that doesn't need fuel sounds good.

Offline hillclimber

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2010, 08:09:46 AM »
HMM. I didn't think about oil or kerosene lamps. They maybe the better way to go. I already have kerosene stored for my heater.
How safe are they? You always see in the movies a lamp getting knocked over and the house burns down.
I'd say they're as safe as any other lamp. They aren't as bright, but the fuel is way cheaper than coleman (naptha) fuel. It's not that I have anything against the coleman lanterns, I have several.
Just remember, they operate by burning pressurized white gas (very clean gasoline). This fuel is vaporized in the generator and suspended and burned in the mantels.
So, you have naptha, under pressure, with the mantles burning less than 2" from the pressurized tank..
I'd say that because a regular kero lamp is not pressurized, and burns a fuel that is not as explosive, they're safer than a coleman.
Again, I use coleman lanterns quite a bit, but if I'm not around to light them, my family uses the kerosene lamps or a coleman lantern that runs on propane and has the piezo ignitor.
Untill I get to the point that my 12v solar stuff set up anyway...

Offline xpertgreg

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2010, 06:59:05 AM »
I collect pressure gas appliances.  Call it a hobby.  :)  I have about 35 lanterns and about 20 stoves all of various makes and models.  You can pick up a good user lantern for around 10 bucks at a flea market.  I have yet to find one that i could not get get running.  You can use regular gas in them, but it will eventually clog up the generator.  You may want to check into Coleman Gas Lamps.  They can be had for 20 bucks on Ebay and are usually in much better shape than lanterns as they were inside devices.  One thing I would caution is to stay away from any lantern made by American Gas Machine, made overseas, or newer Coleman stuff say made above the 1970's.  Otherwise, there are complete websites devoted to lanterns and stoves and how to rebuild them.  I have given $1 for many lanterns, cleaned them, put glass in them, and use them today.  The old ones are hard to kill.  Same can be said for the stoves.

Offline hillclimber

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #13 on: July 18, 2010, 09:53:10 AM »
I have a couple of the newer "dual fuel" coleman lanterns that I've had no problems with. They just don't have the little crank thing that cleans the generator.

Offline reefmarker

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2011, 07:41:23 PM »
Did you consider a propane coleman lantern?  I have both.  I use the white gas ones when I can drive right to the campsite and outside my house.  I use the propane ones for emergencies when I need light inside.  They both put out about the same light, but one 20 pound propane tank will light a lantern for weeks...and you never have to turn off the light cool the lantern fill it and relight it.

Just my $0.02

Offline bartsdad

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Re: Coleman lantern questions
« Reply #15 on: January 09, 2011, 09:51:54 PM »
I would suggest that you experiment with your lights to find out what tasks you are trying to accomplish and how much light it takes to achieve said tasks. The dispersion pattern can be very different light to light. The room you are trying to illuminate also makes a difference. Colors and textures affect how light is absorbed or reflected.
During our last power outage, we did some experimenting and found some things that worked for us and others that didn't.