Author Topic: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed  (Read 8207 times)

Offline NotoriousAPP

  • Senior Survivalist
  • ****
  • Posts: 261
  • Karma: 10
Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« on: December 20, 2010, 12:09:39 PM »
I'm a hunting newb, got my first whitetail this past weekend, cleaned it myself and everything.  I have the meat on ice right now in a cooler.  I have two questions:

1) I plan on letting the meat sit on ice for a few days and drain the blood/water daily.  Should I use salt or sugar in the ice chest or is just plain ice fine?  Will using salt or sugar reduce the gaminess of the meat?

2) I will take the meat to a professional meat processor.  I've listed my plans for the meat below, does anyone have any better suggestions on how to use the meat?  Note: I did not save the neck meat and both front quarters were blood shot from the .308 that killed the deer.

Leg's (hindquarters/ham)
-50% of the hindquarter: Jalapeno and cheese smoked link sausage (mixed with 50% pork)
-25% of the hindquarter: Hot smoked link sausage (mixed with 50% pork)
-25% of the hindquarter: Fresh italian sausage (mixed with 50% pork)

Backstrap:
-1 backstrap: fajita meat
-1 backstrap: Vacuum seal only; eat them as is.

Tenderloin:
-2 tenderloins: Vacuum seal only; eat them as is.

Offline KYdoomer

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1976
  • Karma: 71
  • Zen Gardener
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2010, 01:25:00 PM »
Looks like a good plan to me.

Don't add any salt or Sugar.  I'd get it to the processor as quickly as you can.

Jason

Offline boboroshi

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 104
  • Karma: 7
    • Sfumato Farm
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2010, 03:13:41 PM »
I agree. Get it to a processor ASAP. I am a firm believer in immediately butchering a deer. We've even done field butchering where the landowner lets us and immediately take it home and cut it up into steaks or toss it in the grinder on the Kitchen Aid for ground venison.

Whenever I get tough, gamey venison it makes me sad. Treated right it's a sweet and amazing meat.

Offline Have-Gun-Will-Travel

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 28
  • Karma: 0
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2010, 03:40:30 PM »


should of stripped the tenderloin off right away will be dried up in a couple days

back straps should be taken off and into steaks since it seems you want most the deer into sausage

did not say what you want to do with any of the front. other then the back straps that run from the front to the hind (ribeye to strip loin)

you should cut what steaks and roast you need 1st, then bone out the rest since it seems you want sausage, then bring all the boned out meat in. believe me you will get more meat off if you bone it other then the meat cutters that are doing 20-60 a day will.
will save you a lot of money. just toss all the meat into a garbage bag. they will weigh it when you get there.

Just so you know locker plants do not smoke each venison separate the will weigh what you have make up a large batch with others.

Oh by the way was a meat cutter for many years and 4 of us plus a sausage maker did 400-700 head a season. not counting all the relatives I would do for free in their garages.
,

Offline NotoriousAPP

  • Senior Survivalist
  • ****
  • Posts: 261
  • Karma: 10
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2010, 05:34:04 PM »
Sorry I wasn't clear, the tenderloins, backstraps, hind quarters and flank were all stripped off withing 1.5 hours of killing the dear and placed on ice as soon as they were cut free from the deer.  I've been draining the water from the cooler 2 times a day and topping off the ice daily.

How thick should I cut the tenderloin and backstrap steaks.

Both front quarters were destroyed (blood shot) by the bullet.

Thanks for input from all of you.

Offline Have-Gun-Will-Travel

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 28
  • Karma: 0
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2010, 07:09:06 PM »
I would cut the back strap around a inch thick and the tenderloin 1 1/4 inch thick medallions

Offline WVHunter

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 27
  • Karma: 0
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2010, 05:34:19 AM »
Congrats on your first deer...no matter what you do to the meat you're going to love it because you harvested it.  I'm a big fan of getting it processed or thrown in the freezer quickly.  As far as wild (or gamey) flavor goes...what you're bringing to the table is as natural as it gets...all other meats are lacking true flavor. 

Offline DeltaEchoVictor

  • Evil Forum Overlord
  • Administrator On Leave
  • Survival Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 5735
  • Karma: 542
  • Vincit Omnia Veritas
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2010, 11:14:25 AM »
Tenderloins from a deer aren't big enough to cut up IMO.  Cook them whole in an iron skillet with some onions, new potatoes, garlic & butter.  Cook the new potatoes first, covered for 20-30 minutes on a medium-low heat in the butter.  Quarter them if they're on the larger size...leave 'em whole if they're mini's.  Add the onions when the potatoes are just about soft enough to mush with your fork, let them saute & add more butter as you need to.  When the potatoes & onions are just about done add the tenderloin & cook maybe another 10 minutes. 

Sprinkle on your favorite seasoning about 5 minutes before you're ready to pull it from the heat.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Backstrap is great if you chicken fry it like...chicken, or chicken fried steak.

I like to cut 'em about an inch thick & then butterfly them thinner.  Fold them out on your cutting board & pound the crap out of 'em with whatever your favorite meat tenderizing instrument happens to be.

Crack a few eggs in a bowl & mix up some flour with your favorite seasonings.

Dunk the tenderized backstrap in the seasoned flour, then dunk it in the egg wash (making sure it's completely covered)....then dunk it back in the seasoned flour.

Pop it in some hot oil until it floats & it's golden brown.  You'll slap yer mama. 

I like to mix up some white gravy using the seasoned flour mixture to top it with & some biscuits for soppin'. ;)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I prefer my ground venison with a little beef fat added....but not much.  Tastes much better than mixing it with pork fat, IMO.

Offline hd45hunt

  • Senior Survivalist
  • ****
  • Posts: 246
  • Karma: 9
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2010, 12:25:21 PM »
I prefer my ground venison with a little beef fat added....but not much.  Tastes much better than mixing it with pork fat, IMO.
I second that DEV.  I grind my own and use beef fat for "hamburger" and pork fat for all sausages.  Another good tenderloin recipe is to leave  a nice 8-10" long piece like a roast and then cut down the side while "unrolling" it (think jelly roll).  When unrolled, lay some strips of bacon down, sprinkle with feta cheese and some peppers.  Carefully roll it back up and secure it with toothpicks.  (some people like to cover it with Worcestershire sauce at this point) 350 degrees for 30-35 min.  Mmmm....mmmm...mmmmm!

I'm actually eating a piece of this left over from last night. ;D

Offline DeltaEchoVictor

  • Evil Forum Overlord
  • Administrator On Leave
  • Survival Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 5735
  • Karma: 542
  • Vincit Omnia Veritas
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2010, 01:58:05 PM »
Another good tenderloin recipe is to leave  a nice 8-10" long piece like a roast and then cut down the side while "unrolling" it (think jelly roll).  When unrolled, lay some strips of bacon down, sprinkle with feta cheese and some peppers.  Carefully roll it back up and secure it with toothpicks.  (some people like to cover it with Worcestershire sauce at this point) 350 degrees for 30-35 min.  Mmmm....mmmm...mmmmm!

I'm actually eating a piece of this left over from last night. ;D
Lucky devil.

That sounds good.  ;)

Offline The Fishin Magician

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 52
  • Karma: 9
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2010, 09:14:59 PM »
Congrats! :clap:

I don't have any suggestions for you this go-round, but I suggest in the meantime learning how to butcher/process yourself. It's a very worth-while skill to possess.

These videos are an excellent resource that can help you learn what to do. The guy is a professional processor, and he covers the topics very thoroughly...

http://www.outdooredge.com/game-processing-dvds-videos-s/26.htm

With a little bit of knowledge and minimal tools, you can do it all yourself.


Offline CBP

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 134
  • Karma: 4
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #11 on: December 24, 2010, 04:45:52 AM »
Congrats! :clap:

I don't have any suggestions for you this go-round, but I suggest in the meantime learning how to butcher/process yourself. It's a very worth-while skill to possess.

These videos are an excellent resource that can help you learn what to do. The guy is a professional processor, and he covers the topics very thoroughly...

http://www.outdooredge.com/game-processing-dvds-videos-s/26.htm

With a little bit of knowledge and minimal tools, you can do it all yourself.

I second this!  I got a lesson on this a couple of weeks ago.  Unless I was in a bind, I wouldn't pay the $75 again -- that's just cut/wrap with no fancy sausage or anything.  The straps, loins, and rump into meal sized pieces that I will cut into "steaks" when they are partially thawed.  The shoulders, neck and a bit of the shank were cut for stew meat or ground.  


**fixed tags**


« Last Edit: December 27, 2010, 08:31:30 PM by DeltaEchoVictor »

Offline Wimary

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 58
  • Karma: 6
    • The Wisconsin Times
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2010, 08:51:28 AM »
We clean, cut and wrap all of our own deer.  When cleaning the meat be sure to cut away all of the fat and tallow, and i mean every little tiny piece of it.  Deer fat is terrible and I believe this is what causes the gamey taste.  Also we debone the entire deer.

As others have said, we butcher the same night as the deer was taken.

We have had many friends and family that were non-venison eaters that thought they were eating beef when we serve venison.


Offline mike77

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 557
  • Karma: 8
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2011, 12:45:02 AM »
I would recommend a DVD that Kentucky Afield put out on deer processing field to table. I bought it after reading nothing but good reviews here and elsewhere. I think it was $20 or $30.

Offline PistolWhipped

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1979
  • Karma: 87
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2011, 08:41:38 PM »
I personally like throwing the whole tenderloins on the grill straight out of the animal.  Perk of cleaning and hunting on your uncles land, god rest his soul.  Next time I get the chance I wanna use one for a Fondue Bourguignonne with mustard and horseradish dipping sauces.

I like to leave a roast untouched for deer hash, but that's just me personally.  Also, steaks and backstraps are damn good chicken fried with gravy and biscuits.  I see this has been mentioned.

I personally like to break mine down into the raw cuts, and then make sausage and stuff myself.  That way I can experiment.  You wouldn't believe the fun one can have with a deer, a meat grinder, some animal suet, and a spice rack.

Offline Jloch76

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 13
  • Karma: 0
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2011, 07:57:49 AM »
The ability to experiment and try different things; is what makes processing the deer on your own worthwhile!   Possibilities are endless.

Offline cheryl1

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2318
  • Karma: 79
    • Russell Honey
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2011, 12:29:30 PM »
Does anyone hang their deer to age the meat? Do you think it makes a difference for good or bad?

Noah

  • Guest
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #17 on: November 13, 2011, 03:02:10 PM »
I like to hang mine, I am surprised no one mentioned it above.  I gut them, cut off the head and lower legs, and remove the tenderloins and back straps.  The rest gets hung at least until rigor mortis eases up.

Offline cheryl1

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2318
  • Karma: 79
    • Russell Honey
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #18 on: November 13, 2011, 03:49:57 PM »
We have always hung them, at least when the weather is cool enough. I just wondered what, if any, the taste difference is between hanging or not hanging.

Offline joeinwv

  • The Bee Whisperer
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2579
  • Karma: 92
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #19 on: November 15, 2011, 08:48:26 PM »
I process all of my own - did the first last night for my bro in law. I believe the key to quality meat is to get it cooled down as fast as possible. That means skinned, boned and broken down as quickly as possible.

Honestly, I like to have mine from gutted to freezer within about 2 hours.

Offline CountryRootsCityJob

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 491
  • Karma: 10
  • Yeehaw :D (Unicycles require little maintenance)
    • Building Rome... as fast as I can!
Re: Deer Processing - How should I have each piece processed
« Reply #20 on: November 22, 2011, 10:20:55 AM »
I would recommend a DVD that Kentucky Afield put out on deer processing field to table. I bought it after reading nothing but good reviews here and elsewhere. I think it was $20 or $30.

I was able to get one for free through a friend and I highly recommend this option!  (The free through a friend and the video ;) )