Author Topic: Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s  (Read 7229 times)

Offline Bennington1776

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Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s
« on: July 22, 2011, 11:21:56 AM »
Help, I am looking for quality information on a family size tent.

I am looking for a tent that has the following qualities in this order.

Rain proof not resistant and tolerates wind well.
Made of quality material so the 80lb dog does not rip same with paws.
Well ventilated.
UV protected
A high fire rating would also be great.
Weight is not all that important because this will not be a backpacking tent.  The intended purpose is to set it up on land while we build a cabin.
I would like to stay under the $300.00 range.
Big enough for a queen size air mattress or military style cots.
« Last Edit: July 22, 2011, 11:41:11 AM by Bennington1776 »

Offline rustyknife

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Re: Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2011, 12:28:39 PM »
First thing I thought of was an Army tent however I don't think they are in your price range. Most new tents are not water proof. They may be water resistant but that's not water proof so you will need to treat it. Couldn't tell how many people you are trying to house which would affect the size and price of the tent. More info please. :)

Offline Bennington1776

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Re: Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2011, 12:47:09 PM »
I thought about the Army tent also but do not know if it would be practical because we will set up and break down each time we are there to prevent theft.

It is my wife and I and our dog. 

Something large enough to stand up in 6'2"ish clearance.

I need it to be open because the wife gets claustrophobic at times.

We will be transporting everything in an SUV

Offline upisdown

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Re: Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2011, 03:56:23 PM »
I just ordered this tent from Cabellas yesterday. Unfortunately I cannot give you an actual review on it yet as it has not arrived. However, from the description, it seems like a decent tent with quite a bit of room and its in your price range.

http://www.cabelas.com/product/Cabelas-Big-Bear-Family-Tent/715666.uts?WTz_l=Header%3BSearch-All+Products

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2011, 05:24:37 PM »
I've had good luck with a Eureka Sunrise 9 for 11 years now.  Here's where I got mine: http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___28333

Quote
Rain proof not resistant and tolerates wind well.
Well, it's not a submarine, but mine hasn't leaked yet.  The big fly with the overhanging awnings lets the windows stay open in anything less than a driving rain.  It is thin nylon though; touch a wet wall from the inside and a little will seep through.  Flops around a little in a bad wind, but it's pretty stable.  It has some guy-out points, but I've never had to use them.

Quote
Made of quality material so the 80lb dog does not rip same with paws.
11 years, including 2 kids growing up, it's lasted fine.

Quote
Well ventilated.
Outstanding for this -- in fact, it's exactly why I chose this model.  Big screen windows on all 4 sides.

Quote
UV protected
Hanging in there after 11 years X 4 trips a year.  No evident weathering.

Quote
A high fire rating would also be great.
Haven't tried to set mine on fire (yet), but the site claims 'flame retardant', FWIW.

Quote
Weight is not all that important because this will not be a backpacking tent.  The intended purpose is to set it up on land while we build a cabin.
I would like to stay under the $300.00 range.
Big enough for a queen size air mattress or military style cots.
This tent has all those points covered.

It may or may not be what you're looking for, but it sounds close enough to what you describe for < 2/3 of the budget.  Worth a look.

Offline Bennington1776

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Re: Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2011, 11:45:27 AM »
I've had good luck with a Eureka Sunrise 9 for 11 years now.  Here's where I got mine: http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___28333
Well, it's not a submarine, but mine hasn't leaked yet.  The big fly with the overhanging awnings lets the windows stay open in anything less than a driving rain.  It is thin nylon though; touch a wet wall from the inside and a little will seep through.  Flops around a little in a bad wind, but it's pretty stable.  It has some guy-out points, but I've never had to use them.
11 years, including 2 kids growing up, it's lasted fine.
Outstanding for this -- in fact, it's exactly why I chose this model.  Big screen windows on all 4 sides.
Hanging in there after 11 years X 4 trips a year.  No evident weathering.
Haven't tried to set mine on fire (yet), but the site claims 'flame retardant', FWIW.
This tent has all those points covered.

It may or may not be what you're looking for, but it sounds close enough to what you describe for < 2/3 of the budget.  Worth a look.

On first glance the tent looks to be a good choice.  When I saw that it weighed in at 50lbs that seemed a little heavy but would add to its durability.  In the pictures I noticed the grass strip.  I agree with the assessment of the review on the product, included below.

This was an extremely well-constructed tent. It was huge with plenty of head room. However, there was a strip of bare ground inside the tent about 2 feet wide and the entire length of the front door. This would allow easy access for small critters (snakes, mice, chipmonks, bugs, etc). It would also allow moisture in during rainy weather. You would then have mud inside your tent. It was obvious to us that whoever designed it had never actually camped in a tent.

When you get yours and get some use in I would welcome your opinion on its use and what you think of the tent not truely being sealed.

Offline BetaMike

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Re: Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2011, 12:46:54 PM »
Check out Coleman's Insta Tents or WeatherMasters.  They go up easy, hold up well and you can easily stand in them no problem.  I have the older American Heritage version and it has held up very well over the last six years.  I'm very interested in the new Insta Tents, they can deploy in under a minute with no hardware!  You've got to love that!

Offline upisdown

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Re: Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2011, 01:03:55 PM »
I did notice the strip of grass in the picture too. Not sure what thats all about to be honest with you.

We always put a large tarp down underneath our tent. That would do away with the grass and mud, but the critters is a good point. When I get it, I will put it up right away and see exactly what the deal is.

Offline Bennington1776

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Re: Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2011, 01:57:43 PM »
Alan, thanks for the information, the tent you have looks like it would be a winner but I want a little more head room or space in case we were tent bound for a day due to rain.  I found an Oztent RV3 youtube link here, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adVIQbUWHZk I know I said my original price range was $300.00 but after seeing this and talking it over with Mrs Bennington, her words were “Order it!”  So that is what I am doing.  The tent is $799.00 but I feel it has everything we are looking for and has room to even expand.  Once I get it in I will do a full review for everyone.  Thanks to all for your advice.

Offline Doug

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Re: Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s
« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2011, 02:59:44 PM »
From what you described in your first post if it were me I'd buy a canvas wall tent. http://davistent.com/html/orderatent.html They're better for long term livability.
http://davistent.com/html/phototour.html

Because I'm thinking you plan to set up the tent in the same location each time you could build a wood floor and basic frame to support the tent.
This frame is far more elaborate then what I'm thinking but you get the idea. And if it's heavy enough nobody is going to walk off with your frame.



So what you'd do is drive up, pull out the tent and toss it over the frame, draw the slack out to the floor and you're good to go.

Some people actually buy their canvas and sew up their own wall tents. For example, I have a friend who taught himself how to sew because he bought a book on how to make a tee pee and wanted to build his own. His tee pee being 20 feet in diameter at the base is a lot of floor space. Here's the cost of canvas http://tarps.com/canvas.htm

The advantage to the wall tent is you can have a wood stove inside for heating and cooking http://www.google.com/search?q=wall+tent+stove&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi&biw=1920&bih=937

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s
« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2011, 03:19:20 PM »
...after seeing this and talking it over with Mrs Bennington, her words were “Order it!”  So that is what I am doing.  The tent is $799.00 but I feel it has everything we are looking for and has room to even expand.  Once I get it in I will do a full review for everyone.  Thanks to all for your advice.

Absolutely no question about it, you have picked the right tent!  You're welcome, and please do post a review.  That tent looks really nice.

Offline Bennington1776

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Re: Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s
« Reply #11 on: July 24, 2011, 02:31:47 AM »
Great suggestion Doug.  I will post pictures white my choice and set up as it progresses.

Offline Doug

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Re: Family Tent Pro’s/Con’s
« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2011, 10:48:04 AM »
what I like about the photo is the rain fly above the wall tent. It means if its raining when you get there you trough up the fly and then build the tent under the fly, same with taking it down. Being in the boy scouts camping has been a monthly thing during the fall, winter, and spring months. I've learned to pack and go lightweight, a minimalist. That said I would love to have permanent camp spot where I set up a tent for the season and leave it so if I wanted to go and camp out over a weekend I'd only need to pack food. My choice for that would be a canvas wall tent.

Even though I do pack light I do have a more robust hunting tent. I had the Cabela's 6 person Alaska Guide Model (AGM) tent for 1 year and a half years but it was too cumbersome for one person to put up.  The big advantage with it was that when everyone else's tent was collapsing on them during the night from a strong wind storm the Alaska guide held its ground.
http://www.cabelas.com/catalog/largeImagePopup.jsp?productId=714588&image=s7_517569_imageset_06&cImage=s7_517569_999_03
this tent is a hexigon that we used cots with. However the cots were longer than the wall so there was some wasted space since you couldn't put the cot up against a wall. It did have the option of buying a floor cover for the inside of the tent....since you are concerned about the dog.

I ended up trading the tent back into Cabela's (they gave me a full refund on the trade so I basically used the tent free of charged for a 1 1/2 years) for the Cabela's 10x10 Outfitter tent
http://assets.cabelas.com/assets/images/btn/btn-viewLarger.png
The Outfitter's advantage was that you can set the poles, toss the rainfly over the the poles and build the tent under the fly if it's raining. I gave up some room with this tent over the AGM but it's easier to put up and can handle stronger winds. This is a heavy tent, and the guy ropes are maybe 3/8" thick. This tent is designed to handle a lot of wind and rough weather.
http://assets.cabelas.com/assets/images/btn/btn-viewLarger.png

I have used Mr Buddy Heaters in these two tents but you have to be really careful to ventilate the tent. People have asphyxiation inside tent believe the ripstop nylon had enough air circulating tent's walls. A wall tent with a stove pipe is safer.