Author Topic: pyramid hut  (Read 6823 times)

Offline surfivor

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pyramid hut
« on: December 25, 2010, 06:35:02 AM »
I have this pyramid hut description in a book which seems interesting. It's sort of like a tipi, but is perhaps easier to make, though harder to move.
This one shows the walls made of bark, but I think you could use canvas, shingles, or just a tarp. I wonder if this would work well with a fire pit in the middle. Scroll down to the bottom of this page and you can see the basic frame:

http://books.google.com/books?id=41sjuP07RS8C&pg=PT65&lpg=PT65&dq=bark+pyramid+hut&source=bl&ots=9tNQ6187-3&sig=4Kikf-nljjNEZVsVH5PVpPWs1ZY&hl=en&ei=PukVTefQGsWt8AawyoDSDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBYQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=bark%20pyramid%20hut&f=false

moderator: maybe you should move this up to to outdoor activities instead of outdoor activities->camping .. I don't think I can move it
 
« Last Edit: December 25, 2010, 07:21:40 AM by surfivor »

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: pyramid hut
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2010, 11:10:33 PM »
Woof. It's cute, but I think I'd have to give that design a thumbs-down for real-world utility.

A tipi is one thing: it has a "one-piece"  cover like most tents. But not even the Indians ever figured out how to shingle one--round or square.

They hand-sewed and seam-sealed animal hides--and had to carry their tents via travois because they were so heavy.

For the same amount of material, and a lot less work, you could probably build a lean-to with more square footage and better headroom to boot.

See: Each of those diagonal corners would have to be flashed, or they'd leak like Niagara Falls. So would the porch roof seam if it wasn't flashed.

Another thing: Shingling the last few feet of that structure would be like shingling a steeple. You'd probably need a ladder--say 10' or so. A leaner--a step-ladder probably wouldn't get you close enough.

(Yah--I used to be a roofer.)

The truth will set you free: build one in your back yard, and see how it handles a garden hose...




Offline surfivor

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Re: pyramid hut
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2010, 08:46:23 AM »


 I don't know if it feasible, but I like the idea of a cheap shelter I can make myself out of basic materials that you could have a fire pit in the middle and the smoke would exit out a hole in the top. Such a shelter would be easy to construct and has less things to steal because it has no woodstove or expensive wall material ..

 I guess a lean-to is ok, but it's more open to the wind and elements ..

 I'm not sure if in reality there'd be alot of smoke inside from the fire, though presumably tipis work that way ..

could you use some other material besides shingles or could you use shingles near the bottom and something else near the top ?

 Possibly a lean-to would work if it was going to rain, because if it's raining then it's above freezing and not as cold. A closed in shelter might not have to be quite as rain proof perhaps because it's more ideal for the cold when it's not going to rain, though if it was rain proof that would be all the better.

Offline joeinwv

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Re: pyramid hut
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2010, 09:15:14 AM »
If you make a tipi shaped bunch of sticks - doesn't really matter what you cover it with - it's still a tipi. The only difference I really see, is they are using more rigid materials for the sides instead of a larger cloth / hide / tarp covering - which requires less posts.

From the link, they recommend tar paper - that is probably the easiest thing to cover the sides with, but is not going to be insulated at all. I also do not think this would in any way be faster to build than a standard tipi.

If you are going to build a tipi, build a tipi. I would use oiled canvas tarps. Tipis tend to vent smoke well because they have a high ceiling. Wigwams do not vent smoke well because they are shorter and domed.

Instead of the pyramid hut - I would just build an A frame. Build a small stone firepit on the back side and stick a piece of chimney pipe in it. Done.

Offline surfivor

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Re: pyramid hut
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2010, 11:01:23 AM »
If you make a tipi shaped bunch of sticks - doesn't really matter what you cover it with - it's still a tipi. The only difference I really see, is they are using more rigid materials for the sides instead of a larger cloth / hide / tarp covering - which requires less posts.

From the link, they recommend tar paper - that is probably the easiest thing to cover the sides with, but is not going to be insulated at all. I also do not think this would in any way be faster to build than a standard tipi.

If you are going to build a tipi, build a tipi. I would use oiled canvas tarps. Tipis tend to vent smoke well because they have a high ceiling. Wigwams do not vent smoke well because they are shorter and domed.

Instead of the pyramid hut - I would just build an A frame. Build a small stone firepit on the back side and stick a piece of chimney pipe in it. Done.

 Isn't an A frame like a house ?

Offline joeinwv

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Re: pyramid hut
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2010, 12:14:27 PM »
There are A frame houses, but the basic construct is just 2 walls connected at the top such that the walls are essentially the roof. You could think of it as a double lean to shelter.

Think of a swing set with no swings. Now throw a tarp over the whole thing and you have a big tent. Make the same thing from logs or lumber and close in the sides as you see fit. You can even use a tree as one side. This is no different than using a tarp to make an A frame tent - run a string between 2 trees, throw a tarp over it and stake the ends down. Shelter in 5 minutes.

Here is about as simple as you can get - make 2 big 8' triangles. Connect them at the top with an 8' long board, log, whatever. Now you have what looks like a big giant sawhorse. Put corrugated metal roof panels on each side from the top board to the ground. Use the same material and close in each end, put a hinge on one end so you have a door. Ugly, not insulated, should last at least a decade.


Offline surfivor

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Re: pyramid hut
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2010, 12:29:33 PM »
There are A frame houses, but the basic construct is just 2 walls connected at the top such that the walls are essentially the roof. You could think of it as a double lean to shelter.

Think of a swing set with no swings. Now throw a tarp over the whole thing and you have a big tent. Make the same thing from logs or lumber and close in the sides as you see fit. You can even use a tree as one side. This is no different than using a tarp to make an A frame tent - run a string between 2 trees, throw a tarp over it and stake the ends down. Shelter in 5 minutes.

Here is about as simple as you can get - make 2 big 8' triangles. Connect them at the top with an 8' long board, log, whatever. Now you have what looks like a big giant sawhorse. Put corrugated metal roof panels on each side from the top board to the ground. Use the same material and close in each end, put a hinge on one end so you have a door. Ugly, not insulated, should last at least a decade.



 I had the idea of making a 6 sided log hogan with a cement roof originally as a possible shelter http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=22422.0

 That seems like a possible option, but it had meant cutting a fairly large number of cedar trees on my property as well as planning the whole thing well ahead as the trees have to be cut and seasoned. I do have quite a few such trees. The hogan might also be good for storage, but it also seemed like a good secondary shelter with options for heat.

 I was considering what other cheap options for secondary shelter might exist. What do you think the materials for a small 120 sq foot structure like you describe might cost ? I looked up the metal roof panels, but I am not familiar with them .. I suppose I could also use plywood for walls etc ..
The roof would also need to hold up where snow can get deep and thus need to be strong or have a steep slope, which I guess I would just make it a steep A frame then ..

 If I could put a door on such a structure and use it for storage as well, then it might fit what I had in mind ..




Offline joeinwv

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Re: pyramid hut
« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2010, 12:36:06 PM »
Look at this structure - you could put this together pretty cheap. Especially if you can scrounge materials. This can be made virtually any size, will definitely shed snow. You could easily add insulation, etc.

http://www.themodernhomestead.us/article/Building+a+Pasture+Shelter.html

Offline surfivor

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Re: pyramid hut
« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2010, 12:51:18 PM »

 What do you think the options would be for a fire pit, would you need to build a fireplace with a chimney ?

 I would have an option for a wood stove, but a fire without a stove seems also good since someone can steal a wood stove ..

Offline caverdude

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Re: pyramid hut
« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2011, 10:35:08 PM »
This is a variation on the A Frame I think.. But you need a "Froe" a stick to use like a mallot and something like white oak though there are other trees that work good as well for wooden shingles (shakes)  and a Riving horse, which is made from a forked limb. 

Of course you will need nails with shakes, and something to nail them to.

Offline caverdude

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Re: pyramid hut
« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2011, 01:18:58 AM »
But you need a "Froe" a stick to use like a mallot

I meant a "Froe" and a stick to use like a mallot, such as a stick thats thicker on one end than the other.