Author Topic: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria  (Read 261788 times)

nelson96

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #330 on: February 13, 2013, 10:43:00 PM »
nelson96.

Thanks for those quotes.  We are having to hang on to the Constitution and Bill of Rights as never before in my lifetime.

LOL . . .  I was tagging the thread so I could follow it.  You provide some good stuff, look forward to reading more . . . thanks.

Offline Entity

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #331 on: February 13, 2013, 11:57:51 PM »
Victoria, As a kiwi beekeeper( finally!), you are most welcome about the honey  :P

However, while manuka is endemic to New Zealand I do believe that it is grown elsewhere, in various botanical collections, but also in common growth in south east Australia.
If you do find seeds for it, ( they are out there, but hard to find), there is no significant different in the UMF between manuka varieties, and can form a dense scrub block. Juvenile trees are excellent for privacy.

Do note however that its relative - kanuka - has not been proven to have this benefit, however does well in geo-thermally active areas, and may be ideal for soil stabilisation in such areas.

With any honey from New Zealand, make sure it's tutin scores are low. Most commercial honey has been tested and passed, but occasionally there is a scandal when some slips though the cracks. With the advent of ultra-filtering, to obscure origin, it becomes possible a less scrupulous operator may dump non-compliment honey on an overseas market, leaving all of us to suffer.

Tutin is a toxin from the tutu bush. it makes it's way into honey, when leafhoppers that have been feeding on the tutu bush excrete it in honey dew. It is extremely toxic to all mammals. Symptoms include "vomiting, delirium, giddiness, increased excitability, stupor, coma, and violent convulsions.".

The new zealand government, and indeed most new zealand beekeepers, do take the risk of tutin seriously, and indeed prosecutions have been upheld against beekeepers who fail to keep tutin contaminated honey from entering the food stream.
Indeed I only mention it, because this is a group that likes to know about the possibilities of low risk high impact occurrences, and I would have to advise people that in the case of a collapse of the NZ government services ( the testing labs being high on that list), to IMMEDIATELY cease buying nz sourced honey.

It's safe for now, but just another thing to watch out for.

ps. Most surrounding the beekeeping industry will destroy any tutu we discover, just to be on the safe side.  it's one of the things we are a little paranoid about down here

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #332 on: February 14, 2013, 12:26:11 AM »
The Manuka plant does grow in the wild in New Zealand and I believe the reason this is the only place the honey is gathered for medicinal purposes is that it's the only plant flower the bees use in making their honey, so it's pure Manuka blossoms.  "Manuka Health" company uses tight controls since the honey is used for medicinal purposes.  As with all honey, the jar says not to give the honey to eat to children under four years old.

Certainly, if their processing plant failed, I doubt any more honey would be sold until the problem was fixed since the honey's main use is medicinal.

I've read about honey in general, what is available in stores and is it safe.  If it says "pure honey", it is not a blend of some kind with added sugar or other ingredients.  So, for regular honey, I buy "pure honey", not a blend.  If it doesn't say "pure", I don't buy it.


Offline Entity

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #333 on: February 14, 2013, 01:24:54 AM »
Sorry Victoria, no honey is absolutely from only one species, there is always some drift, even in large mono-flora forages. There is also no way of processing out tutin, other than stringent testing and removal of any contaminated batches.

Honey blends should also not contain additional sugars, these would find their way into honey for sale by incorrect use of feeding.
( Bees are often fed sugar to help them make it though non- nectar flow periods of the year. especially so in relation to mono-flora production. Or put alternately, to help the bees out when there are no flowers in their foraging range.)

You are correct that manuka does grow wild here, and that as a result we are the major producing nation for manuka honey. Manuka honey for medicinal purposes is commonly produced from groomed forage, that is forage where other species have largely been removed. Since the bee's forage area is large, it is impractical to remove all non-manuka forage however, and there is some crossover.

it is currently law that all batches of honey intended for offer to the public must be tested for tutin, by an authorised lab. The offered honey may not have more than 1gram per kilogram of tutin for liquid or blended honeys, or 0.01 grams per kilogram for comb honey. Whilst little study has been done on tutin, it has been observed that one gram of tutin is sufficient to kill an elephant. ( I have no idea why they decided to feed it to the elephant in question).

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #334 on: February 14, 2013, 07:55:30 AM »
Entity,

You should know since you live there and have bees.  When I first became aware of the honey when it saved my friend's leg and read about the honey, that souce said the bees stayed in that area where the plants grow.  My first thought before I read that was why do the bees not move out to other plants/blossoms.  I don't rememger the reasoning behind the bees staying in that area but I think it was that specific location limited their area and the Manuka was the only blossoming plant there.

Do you know of a case in the United States of tutin from any honey making someone sick or killing someone?  It sounds like you are saying every honey made is tested for tutin.

What about any wild honey on someone's property that they gather and eat?  Are those people taking a chance of dying from tutin?  Is tutin more common in the comb itself or is the honey and comb the same?

I didn't include a statement the American Cancer Society made about this honey but they endorse this honey after scientific testing of the ingredients in the honey as being a medicinal help with wounds.  That was encouraging as a number of "natural" products, "holistic" type products, have their supporters with no scientific evidence the product works. 

Thanks for your input on the above questions.  It's seldom there is someone like you who is actually in the business related to a product.  You call yourself a kiwi beekeeper.  To what does the "kiwi" refer?  Surely, you are not talking about honey made from the blossoms of the kiwi plant, or maybe you are?

Offline Entity

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #335 on: February 14, 2013, 01:09:31 PM »
ok, some things i can answer for you ^^_

first kiwi refers to different things, but unless specifically stated that it's kiwifruit, then it isn't a plant ( I know, our overseas marketing makes that more confusing, not less).
the first is the national bird. the kiwi is a flightless bird that eats burrowed grubs, due to a very long and strong beak. They are also sadly very endangered.
The second, is that people from New Zealand, are often referred to as kiwis, in reference to the bird.

The reason given to you about why the bees stay in those areas is valid, and the reason being, is those areas are usually little islands of scrubby bush, surrounded by grazing pastures, often for cattle.  In turn, those areas haven been left because they are the rough terrain of that bit of farm. often steep and difficult to care for in grass. Basically the farmers don't have a decent idea what else to do with them. but they are almost never solely manuka in there. there is often kanuka, pittisporum, rimu, gorse and a whole host of other species. A groomed forage block will have someone go though it once a year and kill unwanted species, but many of those blocks are challenging to work in.
One trick used to limit other species nectar making it into your product is to take off the hive's honey just before the manuka necter flow starts, and then just as it ends. This limits other nectars mostly to the kanukas.
Likewise covers in the paddocks around the manuaka block may also be foraged but this is limited by the placement of the hives. Like most creatures, bees, if given the choice, will go for the easiest forage to get to first, tending that in order of perceived nutrition.
Bees will exit the hive and fly straight for a bit, so beekeepers have been known to 'aim' them at what they want them to concentrate on.

I am not aware of anyone in the states being made sick from tutin, but there was a case a few years ago when some german and swedish people were made sick. All honey is supposed to be tested, but sometimes things get though that shouldn't usually from smaller producers or as the result of rush on orders.

It is strongly inadvisable to eat wild honey here. The tutin would be in the honey. The reason there is a difference between the levels acceptable in liquid honeys and comb honey is that in liquid honey there is more chance for the tutin to be diluted out, where as in comb honeys, it is possible (without being tested clean), that one cell could contain a lethal amount whilst other cells around it are fine. As a result, tutin poisoning from comb honey is usually more severe than from liquid honeys

I am not trying to scare anyone off.
The long and the short of it is that there are risks, that if properly managed let you get a medicine that is once of the few things that is still effective in treating MRSA. That is the magic we are talking about.
The last time tainted honey got through, was before most people knew about manuaka honey and it's benefits.  We are doing our best to minimise any risk from tutin to the consumers of our honey, but being that we are only people, it will eventually happen again.
My hope is knowing what I am telling you, will help give you the tools to avoid the FUD circus that will invariably occur with such an event, and pick out the honeys that remain safe.

Offline Entity

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #336 on: February 14, 2013, 01:48:33 PM »
I left it too long to tack this on the end of the previous reply, but:

For the sake of honest and not presenting a false face, I am relatively new to the industry. indeed the "Finally!" comment was about getting my own hives, rather than continuing to work on other peoples as a learning experience.  Apprenticeships are not required for beekeeping, but they certainly help teach you heaps.

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #337 on: February 14, 2013, 03:35:44 PM »
Entity,

Thanks so much for the information.  Didn't know about kiwi and New Zealand.  All I knew was the Kiwi fruit.

One more question:  As long as this medicinal honey is used on a wound, it would be totally safe, right or wrong?  With any honey, it would be the eating of it that would be the problem, right or wrong? 

Offline Entity

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #338 on: February 14, 2013, 04:49:48 PM »
I truly wish I could agree with that statement, but any contact between tutin and the blood stream or the appropriate mucus membranes is believed harmful. There isn't as much research out there on this particular point as I would like however.

It should be possible to get a copy of the lab report per batch of honey, but it is also possible that over seas sellers may be unaware of it. usually you can ask for the report for that batch to be faxed (or in a more modern sense, scanned and emailed)to you, esp if buying in larger quantities.  Do expect a little grumbling when you ask for this if the quantities are smaller however.

Liquid honey that tests out with a very low level of tutin should not be harmful for wound contact. To give a categorical answer however would depend of a few more factors, such as the true tutin level, the depth of the wound and degree of blood loss. Honey for wound care is usually specified as having considerably less than 0.01mg/kg tutin to minimise any chance for this pathway. This low a level can be quite challenging to achieve in many areas and so you can expect honey that tests out this low, and that has a high UMF to command a higher price.

I also erred in the numbers quoted earlier. ( sometimes there are just too many numbers) the food standard requires less than two milligrams per kilogram in liquid or blended honeys, and less than 0.1 milligrams per kilogram in comb honey. medical standards are more stringent, but i don't have a reference handy atm.

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #339 on: February 14, 2013, 05:16:15 PM »
"This low a level can be quite challenging to achieve in many areas and so you can expect honey that tests out this low, and that has a high UMF to command a higher price."

That is encouraging because the "Manuka Health" brand is super expensive for a small jar of whatever strength. 

Readers, if you ever hear of someone in this country getting very ill from eating honey (someone over 4 yrs. of age as small children shouldn't be eat honey), one can suspect tutin.  I don't think I've ever heard of someone in this country getting ill from eating honey, but it could have happened in years past when it was more difficult for information to get to the public.  These days, practially your every breath is recorded somewhere and if it isn't right, it'll be spread all over the web and cable TV.

Thanks to Entity for information about honey - we're all smarter now about honey.  And, thanks to New Zealand (Kiwi bird country) for this magical medicinal honey.



Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #340 on: February 16, 2013, 01:28:27 PM »
LESSON TO LEARN FROM THE CARNIVAL TRIUMPH SHIP EMERGENCY


Yesterday, I saw a reporter briefly interview a man who had been on this ship.  He was on the ship with his wife who is a nurse.   She always carries an emergency bag on any trip they make.  In that bag, she had water and food and medicines they might need on a trip. 

Out of 3,141 passengers, she is the only one I have heard about who had preparations  of any kind if there was trouble.

The reporter asked the man if he was glad he was married to this woman who had prepared this bag and the husband said yes.

I would bet if the other passengers, before the trip, had heard this woman had an emergency bag, they would have laughed and said nothing could happen to this great big ship.  Well, it did.

Look at the numbers:  3,141 passengers with 1 prepared.   We have over 300 million in this country – how many of those are prepared for an emergency?  How would that percentage stack up against 1 in 3,141?   If we use the ship number, 3,141 people who live around you are not prepared and only you in that group is prepared.  If others know you are prepared, how long will it take before they come for yours when they have nothing?  Remember the war saying, “Loose lips sink ships.” 

What would have happened on this ship, if no water or food got there at all, and they knew this woman had a bag with water and food?  How long would she have lasted before someone attacked her for that bag?

What we know did happen on the ship, is, once good water was no longer in the pipes and food was limited, and this went on two days before more food and water was taken to the ship,  food lines were long and it took one to two hours of standing in a line to get food.  When people got to the food, they stuffed extra food in their pockets and purses.   They had to drink soda in order to have liquid.

The ship staff, once seeing the hoarding of food, told people not to take more than their share as more food would be sent to the ship.  This rationing stayed in effect until more food could get there and even then, it was still, “Don’t take more than your share”.   Did people stop hoarding  because they were told not to?  I doubt it as the primal DNA had started working which says do anything to have food so you won’t die.  They didn’t care about the next person, they wanted to save their own life.

When your grocery store starts running low on food/water for an emergency people know is coming (hurricane. snow storm, etc.),  they are going to buy a lot of food to save themselves and not you.  That is what happened on this ship and it happens every time supplies are limited due to an emergency.  Never think people are going to be nice and share with you.   Remember what happened in the ship food line - people grabbed as much as they could no matter how many were behind them in line and you could have been one of those back in that line.

Think like this nurse does:  “I’m taking an emergency bag when we travel.”  That had to be her thought process since she always had this bag.

Only one person, a woman, was taken off the ship and that was because she had to have kidney dialysis on a certain day or be in kidney difficulty.   If the ship hadn’t  had the problem, she would have been back in time for the dialysis. 

ALWAYS HAVE AN EMERGENCY BAG WHEREVER YOU GO.

Offline soccer grannie

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #341 on: February 16, 2013, 01:57:25 PM »
When we went on a cruise in late 2011, I packed a bag with everything I could legally get through Customs and the ship rules. You are allowed to take X number of bottles of sodas & water. I packed full bottles of daily RXs and bottles of prescription pain meds just in case. I also had labeled zip bags with every OTC med I could think of (sinus/allergy, Pepto tablets, Tylenol & Iburpofen, Orajel, etc) along with all sizes of bandages, Neosporin ... We had flashlights & batteries. Since no weapons are allowed I had scissors (met the length requirement of the ship rules) which could have been taken apart for 2 defense items if needed. As far as food I did have PB crackers & each day we brought some fruit from the buffet to keep in our cabin.

The next cruise I will take more food, duct tape & the hand crank cell phone charger.

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #342 on: February 16, 2013, 02:33:18 PM »
soccer grannie,

Thanks for your post.  I thought yesterday about flashlight and batteries, then forgot to put it in this article.  I saw interviews by all who were interviewed, and all lower floors on the ship were pitch black at night.  Those on those lower floors would have loved to have a flashlight, but they didn’t. A flashlight is vitally important anywhere you go as power could go out for many reasons.  A group of girls were interviewed and one had a tiny light on her keychain and that’s what they used to be able to see something instead of pitch black.

You have done well to prepare yourself for travel.  Your scissors idea is great – I wouldn’t have thought of that.  Some kind of weapon is better than none.  In earlier years, I did a lot of overseas travel and a jar of peanut butter and crackers was always in my carry on bag.  Planes can get stuck on runways for hours sometimes and, while in flight,  I’ve known of food being spoiled when flight attendants got the food out of the large containers and they didn’t know how it could have spoiled, but it did.

I knew a husband and wife who always had peanut butter and crackers and bottles of water and they never ate food prepared by the airline.  They were special people.  They had a decorated false Christmas tree on wheels and kept it in a closet and wheeled it out every Christmas – no decorating, it was already done.  They went on every company trip we went on and the husband, every single time, when my husband and I were at the airport, waiting to get on the plane, would sneak up behind me and kiss me on the cheek.  Every time I knew he was going to do that and I would search for him but I never caught him, he would always manage to rush in and kiss me on the cheek.  It was a game he played with me every time.

Another kiss on the cheek story:  My son is a director of documentary films and lives in London.  His wife was an actress so they had actor/actress friends.  One Christmas I was there and some of the actor/actress people came by to pick up my son and wife to go to a pub.  As they were introduced to me, one of the actor fellas kissed me on the cheek.  These were all just grown up kids to me and I paid no attention to their names.

Some time after that, actor Hugh Grant was caught with a prostitute in Los Angeles – you may remember that as it was all over the news.  That meant nothing to me.  Then, my son called and said, “Mother, it was Hugh Grant who kissed you on the cheek.”  Now, readers, I swear, he ONLY kissed me on the cheek.

Offline oldcountryboy

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #343 on: February 19, 2013, 08:42:32 PM »
Victoria I hope you keep adding to this thread. I enjoy reading it so much. Have not had time to completely read it all yet, but I will. Just wanted you to know how much I enjoy reading your experiences and wisdom.

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #344 on: February 19, 2013, 09:43:16 PM »
oldcountryboy,

Thanks for your comment.  The only way I know someone is reading is to get a comment or see the reading number go up.

I've always been a problem solver and interested in how things work.  If I want to know something, I beat it to death until I know as much as possible.

I think these articles are now as long as a book.  It will take some time to read them all.

The thing is, the way the world is going, there is much to learn and more problems to solve.  It never ends.

Who would have thought our right to firearms would be threatened as fast as it happened?

I watch the news all day.  Today, our government said China is seriously studying/developing how to disrupt our electric grid.  It was said they have been working on this for some time and we regular citizens just didn't know it but the government has known it. 

It used to be said China wouldn't hurt us because they needed us to buy their goods.  That sounded reasonable.  If they are trying to disrupt our electric grid, they must think they have enough customers from other countries to do well now and they can try to destroy us.  They will if the grid goes down for a long time.  Large transformers are made overseas and they aren't made in huge quantities and it takes time for some to get here.  If all transformers were destroyed, we would be in the dark ages again, back to 1800's technology.  Can you say horse and buggy?  Can you say cultivate the ground by hand or horse drawn plow?

As I said, every day there is something new happening.

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #345 on: February 22, 2013, 12:01:38 AM »
I'll soon post an article about a NEW Obama rule the Veterans' Administration has started using to prevent certain veterans the right to have or buy a firearm.  It is certainly possible this NEW rule could be used to prevent senior citizens to have or buy a firearm. 

Didn't I say a short time ago Obama would use "rules" and not laws to confiscate firearms/prevent people from buying firearms because he had control of making rules?  Yes, I did.  After evaluating how he effects change, I know how he thinks.

I hope to get this posted by tomorrow some time.  Give your firearms a hug, let them know you care about them.   :)

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #346 on: February 23, 2013, 10:04:16 AM »
“RULES” FOR BUYING/OWNING/HAVING FIREARMS


Some time ago we talked about Homeland Security and their publication that listed survivalists and Veterans as possible domestic terrorists.  At the time, it was hard to believe Veterans would be on that list.  Of what possible danger could US military Vets be to the government or the populace?  Never in our history has that officially been said by a government entity.  Our Vets are our heroes who have kept this nation safe.  Of course, it was ridiculous to say that about survivalists, too, and I’m sure they have included the term “prepper” now. 

Really, on their own website, they encourage citizens to have three days of water and food for an emergency.  The only conclusion I could come to about their wanting you to have only three days of water/food, was, if you have more than three days of preps, you would be a survivalist/prepper and that makes you a possible domestic terrorist.  Does that logic make sense to you?  What is the difference between three days and five days and a month and a year?   The only difference is you have more water and food.  To jump from more water and food to possible “terrorist” is the product of an Obama liberal led Homeland Security team.

Specifically Veterans:

Some veterans are now getting letters from the Veterans Administration that they cannot buy or keep/have firearms.  The situation about this is volatile at the moment and I didn’t post this yesterday as I was still researching it to get the true story.  Some are saying the VA isn’t doing this, but others have received such a letter.  Here’s what I believe to be true based on my researching this: 

First, the VA is sending information they have on Vets to the FBI database that is used to determine if a person “qualifies” to have a firearm or not.   A VA committee is determining whether or not a Vet is able to run his own life and if they determine he isn’t, using Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and dementia for whatever reason and maybe other criteria to come to this conclusion, then he can’t have a firearm and he gets this letter and the information is put on the FBI database so if the Vet tries to buy a firearm, when the gun shop checks the Vet’s FBI info., the shop will find this Vet is not allowed to buy a firearm. 

The problem with this, is, a VA committee is making this decision arbitrarily without any input from the Vet or anyone else outside the VA.  Right now, the Vet can challenge that decision and go to court and try to get that changed but there is a move to remove even that right – that the VA decision would be final.  So, right now, a Vet could force this to court.  How many Vets do you know who have enough money to pay for lawyers to fight the VA?

A Vet is a regular person just like you and me.  We can, under present law, be determined to have diminished capacity, either mental or physical, to the point we cannot run our lives, feed ourselves or manage our money, and a care giver/protector will be given the right to take care of us.  The method of doing that happens in court when a judge hears the evidence of both sides, if there are two sides, and makes the decision to appoint a caretaker or not.  That is legal.  In the case of Vets, in my opinion and others, what the VA is doing is illegal because they are taking away the rights of Vets without a court procedure as explained above.

A case in point:  In my practice, I evaluated patients for Social Security Disability by a series of psychological tests and interview.  One of the questions I had to answer for the SS, was, is this person, in my opinion, capable of managing the SS funds the person would receive?   There was only one patient I marked as not being capable based on the tests and her daily behavior.  Every day, she stayed in a corner of her bed with a gun by her side in case a man came in the room.  That was her day, every day.  She also had seizures if there was any kind of noise she could hear.  In my opinion, she could not manage her money.  She had family who took care of her.  I’m sure if that went to court, a family member would be named the caretaker to handle her money.

Do you see the difference in determining this in court as opposed to a VA committee making that decision with no input from the Vet or a judge?  If the VA was required to go to court before taking away the rights of the Vet, the VA would have to pay the expense of going to court since they are the ones trying to remove the Vet’s rights.  The way it is now, they take away the rights and the Vet would have to pay the court cost to try to get those rights back. 


SENIOR CITIZENS:

As of right now, senior citizens may have firearms.  What concerns me and others, is, a RULE could be made that after a certain age, a senior could not have a firearm.  Could our government do this?  Sure, they could, just make a RULE.  We already know a new RULE under Health and Human Services, allows doctors to ask their patients and the children of patients, if there is a gun in the house and the doctor gives this information to the FBI database.  All that is needed is a RULE to remove the right of seniors and patients who may be in counseling or have other medical problems.   

I will follow the Veterans Administration as this attack on Veteran’s rights continues and I will stay tuned to the possibility of an attack on seniors’ rights to have a firearm.  Our right to have a firearm is under attack by Obama’s RULES and federal government laws they may pass and liberal states as they pass new laws.

An aside:   Why don’t you people listen to Vice President Joe Biden and just have/buy a shotgun and if someone tries to get in your house, just go out on your balcony (too bad for you if you don’t have a balcony) and fire the two shotgun shells in the air and the invaders will go away?  I include myself in this, not just you.  We are so dumb we thought we needed something more than a shotgun with two shells.  I don’t know about you, but I’m turning in every firearm I have and keeping a two shell shotgun (sure I am.  :))  Joe Biden is dumb as a stump.  (I’m sure his Secret Service guards only have a shotgun with two shells.)  Joe Biden is twice as dumb as a stump.  :)

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #347 on: February 24, 2013, 10:58:21 AM »
GRIEF – AND RESTRICTION OF FIREARMS?


There is a book called the DSM that psychological examiners, professional counselors, psychologists, and psychiatrists use to determine a specific diagnosis of a mental illness.  The latest edition to come out soon is the fifth edition (V).  One category is being changed.  If a person stays in a state of grief more than two weeks, it will be considered a mental illness and have its own designation (number) of a mental illness.

Some think this fast diagnosis after only two weeks of grieving could cause a person not to be able to buy a firearm as they think the diagnosis would be sent/recorded on the FBI database and the person with the diagnosis couldn’t buy or have a firearm.

I visit and post on a conservative website and the posters on the thread about this, were giving mental health workers in general a beating.  I won’t go through here the manner of those printed beatings but I would think some of you may feel the same way about mental health workers.

There was a lot of misinformation on that thread.  After I read all the comments at that time, I made a post as to how a diagnosis happens – the criteria for making a diagnosis and when it’s necessary to make one or not.

The following is a copy of my post and I hope it might clear up any misconception you may have about the use of a diagnosis and those who make such.

Feel free to comment after you read:

I was a professional counselor/psychological examiner for over 20 yrs. and had a private practice.  I was a conservative then, too. I also did grief counseling.

The reason for any diagnosis is this: If a person cannot control his/her own life well enough to carry on his/her usual life, a diagnosis is usually called for to determine why this is happening - but this variant behavior must persist for a length of time to give a diagnosis. Just because the DSM V we use, gives a directive as to length of time for a diagnosis, I wouldn’t have to use that time if I thought it was too short for a patient – remember every patient is different and a cookie cutter diagnosis does not exist if the evaluator has reason to differ with the length of time stated or any other reason that would adjust that diagnosis.

As long as a person can make decisions and carry on his/her life, there is no reason for a diagnosis of anything.

Concerning the grief process:
The same applies with grief. As long as the person can make decisions and carry on his/her life, there is no diagnosis pertaining to grief. Now, consider, a person stays in bed for a year because the spouse died. That situation could call for a diagnosis but only if that diagnosis was required for some valid reason.

A diagnosis is not a diagnosis until it is on paper (considering a computer as paper these days). In other words, I might think in my mind the patient qualifies for a certain diagnosis but until I record that, it doesn’t exist. If I had no reason to record it, I didn’t. Also, once notes about a patient are made, they are subject to be taken to court if for some reason the patient is in court. I didn’t record notes unless the sessions were paid for by another entity, like Texas Rehabilitation or Social Security. I had the ability to remember from one session to another, the last sentence the patient said in counseling the week before and we picked up there. I protected my patient’s confidentiality that way; if I had no notes there was nothing to take to court. If I had made a recorded diagnosis, I had better be able to defend that diagnosis in court.

If a private patient came in for grief counseling, I wouldn’t immediately write down a diagnosis - that would be ridiculous. Each person deals with grief in his/her own way. One can’t put a time limit on grief as going through the process changes as time goes by and that is individual for every person. In my opinion, it is new experiences that help dull the pain of grief and eventually there are enough new experiences that the patient thinks of those intermittently with the grief – it’s not constant grief as it was and as more time and experiences happen, the time spent on grief is less and less.

The grief is gradually put in a box in the brain and the person’s life goes on. However, all the person has to do is think of what’s in that box, and the grief comes back for a time. I have gone through a number of family deaths, my husband’s the latest, and those boxes are there. When I think of one of those boxes, I still cry. We would be inhuman if those memories weren’t there. I can’t cry for long as my Yorkie insists on licking the tears and that gets messy.

So, all psychologists and counselors are not suspect to be as some of you think (just in it for the money and they don’t care if you get better or not). Note I left out psychiatrists. A story: a counselor worked for a psychiatrist. This counselor came to me one day and asked how I “cured” people because the psychiatrist had a patient she was seeing and the patient’s insurance was almost out and she wanted this person to get better before that happened. She had noticed my patients did not come to me for years, mainly a few months at most. I told her my counseling methods to help people “cure” themselves. In my mind, I was thinking it was a terrible thing the psychiatrist was doing – writing prescriptions and keeping the patient until the insurance ran out. My method was, get the patient able to handle his/her life without me and get out of my office as fast as possible.

Sending a grief mental illness diagnosis to the FBI database:
I doubt that will happen with the two weeks new diagnosis because very few would go to a mental health professional shortly after two weeks of the death of the loved one and the vast majority will never go.  What really happens, is, the survivor has to start paperwork immediately or before the funeral and that lasts for weeks or a month or longer.  When the survivor wants to curl up in a ball and let the world go by for a while, it can’t happen because there is paperwork that must be started right then.  I have been through that twice.  Those of you who have lost spouses know the paperwork is facing you right then.

However, if one goes to counseling with a grief problem later because he/she can’t run his/her life anymore and a diagnosis is made, that diagnosis, just like any other, could be sent to the FBI database as Obama has written a RULE allowing doctors to do that.

I hope this helps you better understand how diagnoses are made, why they are made, and maybe you can feel better about some of us. There are even psychiatrists who care about their patients getting better instead of just prescribing a pill – I just wasn’t around any in my work – the ones I dealt with were pill givers and insurance money collectors.


« Last Edit: February 24, 2013, 11:04:18 AM by Victoria »

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #348 on: March 01, 2013, 03:15:43 PM »
I am troubled about this country and other countries (how they have changed).  I'll have an article titled "Troubled" by tomorrow and also talk about Sequestration (THE SKY IS FALLING!).

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #349 on: March 02, 2013, 09:36:53 PM »
WHERE DO THE MAJORITY OF OUR FLU VIRUSES COME FROM HOW DO HUMANS CATCH  IT?  I’VE BEEN THERE AND CAUGHT IT.


I'll post this tomorrow.  Ever had real Peking Duck? (that's a hint)

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #350 on: March 02, 2013, 11:24:48 PM »
Someone told me today she had a picture in her mind of me as a sturdy, tough looking woman due to my prepping articles.  This person was shocked to see a picture of the real me.  She said she would never have thought I look like I do.  I hadn’t thought of my writing painting a picture of me.  I hope I don’t regret this, but here I am:
 
« Last Edit: March 02, 2013, 11:47:35 PM by Victoria »

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #351 on: March 03, 2013, 07:50:34 AM »
Had to ask for help from moderator to get picture on here  - hope that happens soon.

Mod: Click the img code box to the right and paste into thread- it should work as below.

« Last Edit: March 03, 2013, 08:00:47 AM by cohutt »

Offline soccer grannie

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #352 on: March 03, 2013, 12:27:22 PM »
A beautiful young lady sharing her wisdom. :)

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #353 on: March 03, 2013, 12:39:52 PM »
You can see I’m not a two hundred pound, camouflage dressed, boot wearing, rifle slung across my chest, survivalist.  I’m just an average person who preps.  Flu virus article will soon be posted.

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #354 on: March 03, 2013, 01:10:49 PM »
WHERE DO THE MAJORITY OF OUR FLU VIRUSES COME FROM AND HOW DO HUMANS CATCH  IT?  I’VE BEEN THERE AND CAUGHT IT.


China – that’s the place most flu viruses begin.  Why?  Feathered fowl, if they are in the open where infected wild birds can get to them, will become infected with the virus – not all of them will be infected, but it doesn’t take many to set off a pandemic.  If humans are in close proximity to these diseased fowl, the virus mutates and crosses into humans.  Someone gets it and gets on a plane and spreads it on the plane and wherever that plane goes, that country becomes infected. 

Even if no other plane passengers caught it from the one human source on the plane, that person gets off the plane and heads toward a bathroom.  Why do I know that?  Because we all do when we get off a plane, having been on there for many hours coming from a foreign country, and the trip from China takes a century (not really but it feels like it) to get back to the states.  No one likes the bathrooms on a plane.  They may use that bathroom once during that long trip, but as soon as they get off the plane, they go to an on the ground bathroom.

Every time the infected person coughs, viruses are thrown to anyone  outside or inside that bathroom area and every surface touched in a bathroom leaves the virus there.  Unless that person is quickly confined to an isolation room and the bathroom disinfected, that state will eventually be full of flu virus infected people.  I got a flu virus in either China or Hong Kong and may have infected people before I got home although I tried to keep myself away from people and I held a tissue in front of my mouth when I coughed and tried not to touch a surface with my bare hands.

How does a flu virus get started?  I went on a day trip into mainland China, entering at Macao, then continuing into the countryside.  I already knew most of the flu viruses we catch start there but didn’t know I would see how it happens. 

DUCKS, IT’S THE DUCKS, specifically Peking Ducks as I never saw any other kind.  The Peking Duck is the product of cross breeding to come up with this duck with a thin skin and this duck has all white feathers.  I saw thousands of them and no other color than white.  When making the dish, Peking Duck, air is blown under the thin skin to separate it from the meat and then the duck is fried in a special way.  The skin is then crisp and served with various sauces.  Well, yes, you also have duck meat but it is the skin that is the delicacy and is the first course when eating Peking Duck.  The meat is the second course and it’s usually served inside a folded pancake.  The last course may be bone duck soup or if soup was not made from the bones, the diner may take the bones home.

If these ducks were kept in coops, protected from wild birds, viruses wouldn’t start there so therein lies the first problem.  They are not kept up in any way until they reach a certain size.  They roam the countryside – thousands upon thousands.  The land looks like a white ocean.  They are on the side of the road, they are everywhere.  They live among the citizens and therein lies the second problem.   These ducks like people, they like being around people and therein lies the third problem.

I went to a countryside open air market – I’ll never forget what I saw.  Peking Ducks were walking around in the midst of the people.  Raw, de-feathered ducks were hanging from hooks  in front of make shift lean-to “shops”.  Live eels were swimming in buckets.  Raw fish were also hanging from hooks.  And there were the live Peking Ducks taking it all in along with the people.  Chickens also could be infected but chickens are not around people nearly as much as those ducks.   I didn’t see one chicken roaming the countryside and not one chicken walking around at the open air market.

I could see then how a mutated flu virus a duck was carrying could easily be transmitted to the people.  There was no way to keep from being around a duck. 

I don’t know when I contracted the flu.  There was no hand sanitizer in those days and one would have to wash hands constantly and stop breathing or never go out in the open and stay away from family members who had been outside, in order to be sure one didn’t catch the flu.

I caught it just before flying back home.  I felt terrible.  I thought my head would explode.  When we began our descent toward the Los Angeles airport,  my ears started hurting terribly.  I tried all the ways one is supposed to use to equalize pressure in the ears and nothing worked.  Once down and in the airport to wait for another flight to Houston,  I didn’t think I could go on – I wanted to be in a hospital right then or anywhere I could get in a bed and stop moving.  There was no muscle that didn’t hurt, my head was so painful I couldn’t see normally and I knew I was in a bad way.

I didn’t go to a hospital, I got on the next plane.  When we began our descent into the Houston airport, I thought my ears were going to burst and the pain was so bad, I cried.  When I finally got home, I fell in the bed.  I had been moving in the air so long, I still felt like I was moving.

I went to a doctor the next day.  He said it would have been better for me if my eardrums had ruptured – the pain would have stopped if they ruptured.  My vital signs were okay and I didn’t have pneumonia.  As a precaution, he did give me some antibiotic pills which I took.  I stayed in bed for several days to recover from that illness.

I think it would have been better to check into a hospital in Hong Kong instead of flying back.  However, there is that possibility that being in a hospital close to flu prone/other diseases in the Hong Kong/China  area, I could have gotten worse by catching something else in the hospital. 

If you catch the flu in the future, BLAME PEKING DUCKS.

« Last Edit: March 03, 2013, 06:36:46 PM by Mr. Bill »

Offline LvsChant

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #355 on: March 05, 2013, 10:30:25 PM »
Thanks for sharing, Victoria... I enjoyed the article about the ducks!

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #356 on: March 06, 2013, 08:54:41 AM »
Thanks LvsChant for your comment.  You are a loyal friend to hang in with me during the years I have been posting here. 

Sections of land in China are divided into “Provinces”.  I don’t recall now the name of the province I was in where all the Peking Ducks are.  However, I knew then what it was.  The next time, after my visit, a flu virus was rampant in this country, I saw on TV, this virus had been traced to THAT PROVINCE and that province appears to be the one where they all start if the virus comes from China.  AHA!  I thought to myself, I knew it had to be those ducks! 

I’m working on a gardening article.  That is my worst area in preparing.  Green thumb?  Forget it, I can kill any plant.  I’m trying a new method of growing to see if it works.  I have limited space in my small garden area behind my townhouse.  Outside my back door is a covered patio, and behind that is a raised patio.  Behind that is actual dirt.  There are rose bushes in that dirt and spaces where nothing is.  I don’t bend well due to a lower back problem.  I’m not using that dirt area to grow plants due to that physical problem.  My plants will be grown in pots placed at a level they would be if put on a table and that’s where the pots are going – on tables or anything else that gets the plants up high.  Some plants won’t be in a pot, instead, they will grow in bags.  I’ll explain this in the next article.  I’ll post that either later today or tomorrow midmorning.   

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #357 on: March 06, 2013, 11:01:25 AM »
I'll soon post an article about a NEW Obama rule the Veterans' Administration has started using to prevent certain veterans the right to have or buy a firearm. ...

FYI, we have a thread on this topic in the Firearms Legislation And News board:

Department of Veteran Affairs disamring veterans?

I did a little research, and it's not a new rule.  It's been going on since 1999.  Senator Richard Burr has repeatedly (and unsuccessfully) introduced legislation to stop it since 2008.

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #358 on: March 06, 2013, 11:52:24 AM »
Thanks, Mr. Bill,

I have recently read that, too.  It seems new attention has come to that rule to use it now for greater effort to prevent vets from getting guns.  The problem is the Vet Admin. doesn't have to go to court to remove a Vet's right to a gun.  They take away the right, then the Vet has to fight to try to get it back.  The VA should have to go to a regular court to take away that right as they are basing taking away that right on diminished capacity of the Vet.  A Vet is a regular citizen just like you and me.  Someone to take away our right to anything we have a right to have, requires going to regular court and proving we have diminished capacity.  So, the rule giving the VA the power to take a Vet's rights away from him/her, was unconstitutional whenever it was put in place.  It has now come to the forefront as a rule to use to stop Vets from having guns.  Rules are not laws but are being used as laws and it's happening in Obamacare, too, as a way to stop people from being able to buy guns

Prepping is incomplete if one cannot defend him/herself and efforts are being made in numerous states and our federal government to prevent self defense, except for VP Biden's shotgun advice to have one and fire it outside. :) 

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #359 on: March 07, 2013, 09:09:07 AM »
DRONES AND PREPPERS


I bring this up because preppers were mentioned yesterday in a US Senate filibuster.  Perhaps some of you watched US Senator Rand Paul yesterday who begin a filibuster that lasted twelve hours.  I watched it all.  Preppers were mentioned by what we do, not by the name, “Prepper”.  Paul wants a definitive  answer from the President and/or the Attorney General to the question, “Will you use a drone to kill an American citizen in America if he/she presents no imminent threat?”  He wants to make sure an American can’t be killed on American soil without going through legal due process. 

During that filibuster, he listed types of people who, according to a document by Homeland Security, are suspect of being possible terrorists.  One group he mentioned that is on the list are people who have seven days or more of stored provisions for an emergency.  He said people who live on the coast are urged by Homeland Security to have seven days of provisions.  He made the point it’s okay if you live on the coast to have those provisions but if you don’t live on the coast and have those provisions or more than the seven days, then you are suspected of being a possible terrorist.  His question as to these groups profiled by Homeland Security was, would these people who store and other groups on the Homeland Security possible terrorist list, be killed by a drone without going through due process if they were not posing an imminent threat?

At this point, we do not have a statement in writing from the President or the Attorney General that they would not kill Americans on American soil using a drone without going through due process.  I do not believe people who store water, rice and beans, are possible terrorists.  I believe it is having a gun along with those provisions that freaks out Homeland Security.  I believe President Hussein Obama will have to respond to Senator Paul sometime soon.  When that happens, I’ll post it.  Preppers need to be secure they won’t be attacked without due process simply because they store.

Gardening is next.