Author Topic: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria  (Read 263634 times)

Offline Nicodemus

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #180 on: July 12, 2012, 03:04:56 PM »
Glad to hear it and welcome back, Victoria.

Offline LibertyBelle

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #181 on: July 12, 2012, 08:55:18 PM »
I've gone throught the eye surgeries and see well now.  Best to all of you.
Victoria

That's wonderful news, Victoria! Glad to have to back. :)


Offline Docwatmo

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #182 on: July 16, 2012, 12:27:45 PM »
Awesome news on the eyes.  Glad to hear your back at it.  Can't wait for the next installment.

Doc

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #183 on: July 16, 2012, 02:57:39 PM »
WHY HAVE A FRIEND OR FRIENDS ITSHTF?

Most of us have a plan for our day.  That doesn’t work when one comes downstairs and the floor is covered with a layer of water.  It was a thin film with some puddles here and there.  It covered the whole floor.

My beautiful, almost new, Pergo floor was covered with water last week.  Forget what I was going to do that day – my plan was shot.

I got towels and dried a small center part of the room so I could let Prissy out of her bedroom (which is the downstairs bathroom) and that bathroom didn’t have water, thank goodness.

Then, I sat down with my coffee and a cigarette (yes, a cigarette, get over it, okay?).  The water had to be removed fast to save the Pergo planks if they could be saved.  I didn’t know how long the water had been there – when in the night/early morning did this happen?

I had never had water in my house, where did this stuff come from?  What was my first thing to do?  First, it’s hard to get over the shock – I had a frozen brain right then.

If your house floods in day time hours, you see it happen and you react to do what you can.  But, when you wake up and there is water all over, it’s hard to think quickly.

I thought of my friend who has four boys.  She is sometimes in Austin for meetings, and I hoped she was not gone.  She was home.  Score one win.  You bet, she would come with a son and two of his friends who were with him, plus she brought her teen age daughter who is a sweetheart.  Score another win.  And, I hadn’t eaten, was working on the water, so she brought me food.  Score another win.

They arrived and I had gathered every towel I had except the expensive ones, and they moved every piece of furniture in this room and the water started going away.  After a period of time, my friend went to a large barbecue place and bought what everyone wanted to eat and drink.  They ate outside on the patio where there was a table and chairs as there was no place in the room as furniture was everywhere with a small path through it.  Even the piano had to be moved as there was water under it.

What has this got to do with prepping and an emergency happening?  Here it is:  you need true friends and we haven’t talked about this in terms of prepping.

I have stuff, I am prepared.  But, none of that meant anything in this emergency.  It was an emergency and I couldn’t fix it on my own and my little Yorkie, Prissy, couldn’t help either – she wondered what was happening in her house with these people here and her furniture everywhere.  You see, she owns everything here and she lets me live with her.

Do you have at least one friend you know you can count on – someone who would drop everything and come to your aid?  If you don’t have at least one friend or family member who is also a friend, get one.  Several is better than one, but you must have at least one.

A friend or friends should be on your prep list and no, I didn’t have any names on mine.  It was in my head but I hadn’t thought how important it is.  Now, if you have a compound defended by numerous guys with assault weapons, you have friends.  If you are like the majority of us, you live in your house carrying on your daily life as you have done all your life.  If you are older, your kids likely don’t live with you and they may be spread all over the country.  My son lives in London, England, so he can’t help me on short notice.

Down to brass tacks on this, if your friend or friends are older, too, they likely can’t move furniture, can’t do physical labor.  Think about it – do you have a friend or friends who are physically capable or know people they can get that are physically capable?

The closer they live, the better.  If the SHTF and you have an emergency like this or other emergency, can a friend get to you?  I had friends in the Texas hill country and family in Corpus Christi, and the son in London, and none of them were close enough to get here.  If there is no gasoline, no power, what will you do in this type emergency?  Someone you know that is close by, is a major asset in an emergency.

I would bet your brain is working this problem right now.  You’re putting together a mental list of those you can count on to help you and who can get to you.  That is the purpose of this article.

Yes, I found the source of the water problem.  Something has happened in my chimney and water is flowing into the chimney wood box surrounding it outside and the water is getting in.  We had six inches of rain during the night and early morning of the day the water came in.  Enough water built up inside that box that it came in.  There was major flooding in this area but I wouldn’t have had water except for this dumb (read that as “damn”) chimney.  Repair will start tomorrow.  I may have to replace some Pergo planks.

Think about your real friend list.  If you don’t have one, cultivate one where you hang out – church, work, next door, anywhere (local pub?).

Next article is new items I found in securing the outside of the house, self-defense, warming the house, fast good food using little fuel.

Offline Roundabouts

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #184 on: July 16, 2012, 03:23:19 PM »
Way to go Victoria as usual great post!  I have to say that I have been in a situation earlier this year where I really could have used someone.  Well other that hubby.  It hit me like a ton of bricks that I had let all my contacts die with the closing of my business.   My closest friends that I had, you know the ones that you can really count on have either passed away or moved across state. 

Over the last 4-5 yrs I found myself not knowing one person to call besides my hubby.  The kids are spread all over the world so I understand that part.  I always have had lots and lots of contacts and people to count on.  Some how over time that list has disappeared one by one without me really noticing until the day came when I had a need.  I don't know if I was more sad or scared.  How could I have let this happen?  How did I not notice it? 

When I talked to hubby about it he hadn't really realized it either.  He does have some people I bet he could call if need be from work.  But that is really not the same as friends that you KNOW will be there.  I do not know these people at all.  That would do me no good.

So I started going through old contacts clients and people I had had something in common with and could at least speak with if I ran into them in the store.  Now we can add at least one person to that list.  He also knows we can be added to his.  Makes me feel better.  But still it use to be I could draw on several dozen people at least.  Have a long way to go.  But at least I am aware of the problem now.   

Jack says all the time no man is a island that is very true.

Over the years I have moved to other states or areas where I knew no one.  It is amazing how many complete strangers are willing to help if just asked.  Saved my butt a few times.

Thanks for posting this I can get wrapped up in everything I am doing and easily let this one slide under the rug. 

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #185 on: July 21, 2012, 06:37:26 PM »
Roundabout, change always happens and friends move and once one leaves a job, few of those contacts remain.  I’m not a highly social person and that won’t change but we all need a few good friends we can count on.

SECURITY

Self-protection:
Well, you know how I am – have Plan A and B and C and probably D.  Nicodemus has commented about my having numerous ways to do something.  I’ll just admit to overkill and keep doing it.

So, I have a heavy 38 revolver in a drawer on my bedside table.  Let me stop here and say if you have children between toddler through teen age, make sure they can’t get to your guns.  In an emergency situation, however, you don’t want them locked up or disassembled where it is hard to get to them.  If you can’t get to them quickly and be ready to fire, you have a problem.  I do not have children at home.  This Colt 38 is old and belonged to my husband.  I can get it in a second.  The first bullet is filled with buckshot that will slow down the intruder and the rest are hollow point bullets and the intruder would be dead.

That Colt stays in that drawer but I have a two story house.  I wanted a lighter gun I could carry on my person all day if TSHTF.  I discussed this with my friend who lives in another part of Texas.  I researched guns on the web, too, and read and read and read.  So, with that background, I go to my close Academy store to talk to one of their gun guys.  I had read about a certain gun for women, and I asked about that one.  He said I didn’t want that and showed me one.  It was a pistol and I couldn’t pull back the slide.  He took it and he couldn’t pull it back, either.  We dumped that pistol.

This salesman was late middle aged and knew guns.  He took out a “Ruger LCR 38 Special” revolver and said that was the one I needed.  I found out later that a number of  policemen use this gun for their backup weapon.  The hammer is inside the gun so the hammer can’t catch on something, and the gun is fairly light weight – it’s easy for a cop to hide.  It’s double action so it’s doubtful the trigger would be accidently pulled through two stages to fire the bullet.  I easily had the strength to pull the trigger and there was no slide to pull back as with a pistol.  It was the right gun for me.

These Rugers are expensive.  One will mostly eat up a $500 dollar bill.  Men who have several guns have invested a lot of money.  The only thing I can say about the cost of a gun is, who is going to eat all your stored food if you have been killed by someone who had a gun and you didn’t? 

Then, I asked myself how was I going to wear this gun on my person?  I looked on Amazon for fanny packs.  I didn’t know jack about fanny packs so I educated myself.  I settled on one by “Galati Gear” for about $25.  This is called the small one and there is also medium and large. There are two zippered pockets on the front, and another larger zippered one on the top.  The gun fits in a pocket in the back and that closes with strong Velcro.  It looks like a usual fanny pack and will carry all important items you need if you go shopping.  Think about it – you would have two free hands, no purse to carry, if you used this.  Also, there is no purse snatching if you wear this. These are not gender specific, a man still looks like a macho guy with his fanny pack.  There are many fanny packs on Amazon but not a huge number for a gun one but there are still plenty to choose from.

You absolutely cannot tell a gun is in this fanny pack.  If you had to use your gun, just jerk down on the Velcro and the gun is in your hand immediately.  In a SHTF situation, just wear the fanny pack at home and your gun is with you no matter where you are.

This Ruger 38 special is not a large gun – it’s on the small side which, in my opinion, fits a woman’s hands better.  If your gun is larger, you need a larger size fanny pack.  Customer comments on Amazon talk about which guns fit in which size.  Those comments took me to the small pack.  I have stopping hollow point bullets for this gun plus two fast loaders for it.

I have another new gun.  I did not have pepper spray.  So, I searched around and found “Mace Pepper  Gun”.  You can get them in various colors, so I got pink.  It doesn’t look dangerous since it is pink and that’s why I got that color.  It’s effective up to 20 feet.  When you pull the trigger, a LED bright red light comes on to tell you if you’re on target.  They also provide a water cartridge to practice using the gun.  It says it delivers a powerful stream of super strength pepper.  I also got the usual small pepper spray small enough to go on a key chain but the one for home is this pepper spray gun.  I bought a few extra cartridges so think about doing that if you get this gun.  I don’t recall the price of this gun but it was very reasonable – not a high dollar item.  If you have children do not leave this pepper gun where they can get it.

Think about your personal security – do you have a gun, know how to shoot it, and can you get to it from anywhere in your house?  I can do that now that I have that fanny pack.  I’m pushing fanny packs  - got a fanny pack – it may save your life.

Next is hardening house security in case zombies come to your house.



Offline Marianne

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #186 on: July 28, 2012, 06:44:35 PM »
Hi Victoria – It is great to have you back! When you appeared on the scene back in January 2011, I had just gotten interested in prepping. My oldest son had returned from a tour in Iraq after having served in the Army for ten years. He came home with a healthy interest in prepping and had extensively researched the topic on the internet while he was overseas. He suggested several forums to me. His interests are somewhat different from mine obviously, so I went looking for my own sources of information. I stumbled on The Survival Podcast Forum and happily found the Women Survivalists board. Then out of the blue, there you were - a voice in the wilderness! Immediately, with your first post, I was hooked. Something about your humor, straightforward writing style, logical presentation, authentic life experiences, and extensive knowledge encouraged me to get my act together. I definitely needed help.

At the time I didn’t have matches or lighters in the house, barely any batteries, very little bottled water or food in the pantry, no cash on hand, only a couple of candles, three rolls of toilet paper and no gun. As a fine example of being ignorant of one’s ignorance, I had put myself at risk should there have been an extended power outage, or a financial collapse, or if anything happened out of the ordinary. Your opening line hit me hard, “When trucks stop, it’s over.” I get it. Trucks can stop suddenly and stay off the road for a long time.

Many women are in the same boat with me. Working hard and saving our pennies has been our primary mode of survival.  Since 2005, there are now more single than married women in the United States.  Women are less likely than ever to have husbands to depend on when times get rough. We have to depend on ourselves and think about the basics of survival. I am old enough to realize that things have changed dramatically in the last 50 years. There is something in the air that is unsettling – uneasiness about the future, a lack of confidence in the sanity of the world, which many of us are feeling. In order to sleep well at night, I must do something – preparing for whatever is the answer for me. As a “mature” single woman, condo living in the middle of huge city, with no family in the state, I face obvious limitations and challenges.

My closest friend with a house is 35 miles away and my sons live in another state eight hours away by car. Yes, if there is time, I must at least go to my friend’s house in the suburbs and take as many of my preps with me as I can load in my car should something weird happen. No way can I run off to the hills where I would have to live alone, even if I was able, grow my own food, split wood, hunt and fish. Let’s get real – I am old! And being old, I know my generation will be the most vulnerable in a major prolonged disaster. It is just a fact. But I won’t go down easily or stupidly just because I was not prepared!

Victoria, your “theory of three” and alternative suggestions for solving various issues have inspired me to get off my duff and do what I can to help myself during times of crisis. Still, all this prepping stuff requires thought, research, time and money. Knowing that you are OK, that you are coming back from your trials and tribulations of the past year, is reassuring to probably more people than you realize. I for one thank you from the bottom of my heart for sharing your knowledge, experience and encouragement. You’re the “bee’s knees!”

Susie (Old Urban Ant)
« Last Edit: July 28, 2012, 06:49:53 PM by Solo in the City »

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #187 on: July 28, 2012, 07:21:53 PM »
Dear Solo in the City, Susie, we are in the same boat – older and alone (I’m probably older than you).  You are in a condo, I am in a smallish townhouse I own.  I wish I were as strong as a man, but I’m not.  Whenever an able bodied man enters my house, he gets a job to move or lift something I can’t.  Never let a strong man go to waste.  :)

I’m glad you are doing something to prepare yourself for an emergency.  I’ll write another article tomorrow about affordable security measures I have taken since I wrote the previous articles.  I have also put together a fast way to provide good tasting food for a week or more before getting into more grocery store storage and long term stored food.  This will easily work for area power outages for any reason (like the storms that have hit the northeastern part of the country), or days without power due to hurricanes.  My area won’t be out of hurricane season until the month of September is over.   

So, check back late Sunday or for sure, Monday.  We’ll just keep going and going and going.  Thanks so much for your post.   

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #188 on: July 29, 2012, 12:57:23 PM »
MORE HOUSE SECURITY – ZOMBIE ALERTS

About zombies generally:  It is my personal opinion, that in case of a “real” – whatever that is) dead zombie invasion, putting broccoli around your house will keep them away as no one but me likes broccoli.  This article, however, is about live zombies (bad guys), trying to get in your house.

More is better for house security.  As usual, I added more ways to accomplish a purpose if TSHTF.
If there is no power, batteries work and plug in the wall doesn’t.  If zombies appear, I want to stop them before they get in my house.  I want to know they are trying to get in – I want zombie alerts.  So, I did research for zombie security alerts.

There are two types of alerts.  One is motion detectors.  The other is vibration detectors.  These items aren’t expensive – none over thirty dollars and most are less.  I can’t give you the exact amount because I don’t remember.  You will find all of them at Amazon.  Don’t buy the Master Lock bar window alarm there – use the company listed farther down in this article where that item is discussed.
Motion detector for the backyard:

“StrobeSecurity System” (there is no space between “Strobe” and “Security”)
This system is for indoors or outdoors if protected from weather.  For me, it is under a roofed deck.

“The Motion Alarm is built with a Passive Infrared (PIR) sensor to detect motion within 110-120 degree angle and a 25-30 ft. radius.”  It has a loud alarm and a strobe light starts.  The zombie can’t turn it off as it is controlled by a small remote you will have inside the house.  The zombie will likely leave then.  Let’s say he doesn’t and keeps coming to your back door with that alarm still screaming.  Here is the backup alarm on the door or sliding glass door if you have that which I do.

“Techko S184s”  This is a VIBRATION alarm.  It starts screaming if it senses a vibration.  It has a hanger so you can attach it on the door knob or, which I think might be better, tape it somewhere on the door.  It has an “off” switch but by the time a zombie could get through the door the alarm would have been screaming for some time and you would already be there.

You may find a motion sensor or vibration sensor on Amazon you like better than these two, but I read about every single one on Amazon and determined these were the best to do the job.  There are a number that takes the little round batteries and I dumped those because I wanted to use regular batteries that are easily found.

Sensor for Windows:

For front windows a zombie could reach.  My windows have the vibration sensor attached.  If the glass is touched, the vibration sensor will scream.  I also put a window bar at the top of the lower window that is wedged against the top of the window enclosure.  That prevents the window from being pushed up.  In large red letters that point outward, it says, “ALARM”.  This is made by Master Lock.  It’s expensive on Amazon, $59.99, but you can go to “Top Tool” website and find "Master Lock 266D Window and Patio Door Lock with Alarm", for $17.50.  That company on Amazon is outrageous for their price.

So, if an zombie is outside, he sees those big red letters, ALARM, on that bar and he will likely go somewhere else.  If that doesn’t stop him and he touches the window glass, the loud vibration alarm goes off.  This zombie is sunk, can’t raise the window, can’t touch the glass.

We have already talked about front doors.  You could hang a vibration sensor on the door knob.  I have a heavy duty Buddybar I’ve mentioned before to keep the door from being kicked in, plus a wedge that goes under the door and screams it if is moved so technically that one is a vibration alarm.

If you have a door in your garage that allows entry into your house, consider a vibration alarm on that door on the side in the house.

Think about being alerted to zombies, alive or dead, by adding motion and vibration sensors to your yard and your windows and doors.

P.S. If these are dead zombies, you must shoot them in the head or whack off their heads, in order to stop them.  Hollow point bullets are good for this job and a machete works best for lopping off heads.

Offline monkeyboyf

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #189 on: July 29, 2012, 05:47:04 PM »
As always, your informative article sprinkled with rib-splitting humor has left me feeling better than I have in days.  Having the contacts online to go to has really helped me. I do already have hollow points in bulk and a sharp machete. Thanks again for this info. ;D

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #190 on: July 29, 2012, 08:37:44 PM »
Glad I made you laugh and feel good - you never know when a zombie will appear and want to eat your brains.  You must have good brains because you are a Reagan guy.

I have another article almost ready to post.

Offline monkeyboyf

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #191 on: July 29, 2012, 09:50:59 PM »
Lol, I really need to put it in my sig line that I am an old female, but a Reagan female. ;D

Offline TexDaddy

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #192 on: July 29, 2012, 09:53:20 PM »
Victoria,

I just showed my wife the vibration detectors and the buddy bars.

She's on it.

Thanks.

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #193 on: July 29, 2012, 09:58:38 PM »
Okay, monkey, you're a girl.

TexDaddy, good for you to protect yourselves from the zombies.

I'm posting another article right now.

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #194 on: July 29, 2012, 10:08:34 PM »
HEATING A ROOM – ONE MORE WAY

I found there are now propane heaters that are safe to use in your house.  If your power goes off in the winter, just get your Mr. Heater out and light it.  It has an oxygen sensor and will turn off if the oxygen level in the room begins to lower.  If knocked over, it turns off.  Just follow the directions and use it safely indoors.

I got the small one that heats 200 sq. ft. and uses one small propane bottle.  One that size will be fine for me and Prissy to stay warm during the day.  I won’t use it at night.  If it’s really cold at night, I’ll put the sleeping bag on the bed and zip her in there with me.  I got several small propane bottles.  The heater is $79 at Lowes.

The larger Mr. Heater uses two small propane bottles and is $139 at Lowes.  It will heat up to 400 sq. ft.

True story:  My sister-in-law and her husband came to visit.  He is an engineer and very vocal and knows how everything in the world works.  Well, he saw this box that had “Propane Heater” on it and went ballistic.  “You can’t use this!  This will kill you!”  There was nothing to do but wait until the verbal explosion detailing how I would die, stopped.  Then, I said, “It’s safe to use in the house – read on the box.”  He saw in big letters, “SAFE FOR INDOOR USE”.  He said, “Okay”, walked away and said nothing else.  I gather a lot of people don’t know about these safe to use indoor heaters.


FAST FOOD FOR SHORT EMERGENCIES

I keep thinking about that next hurricane and no power.  What would be the easiest, but tasty, food I could put together using little fuel?  I found it - Progresso creamed soups.  These are thick soups with wonderful spices.  They are so thick they don’t eat like soup.  Open a small can of meat to add more meat to the thick soup, and it’s more like a casserole than soup.  You probably don’t believe me.  I might not believe it, either, except I experienced it.  Open a can of fruit for a side dish and enjoy.  Really, buy one of these creamed soups and see what I mean.  Whoever decides what spices to put in these soups, is a winner.  In an emergency with no power, fire up canned heat in your Sterno stove, put soup in small pot and heat and eat with fruit on the side.  Here are the varieties:

Rich & Hearty Chicken Corn Chowder, Rich & Hearty Chicken Pot Pie Style, Rich & Hearty Creamy Chicken Wild Rice, Rich & Hearty Loaded Potato with Bacon, Rich & Hearty Savory Beef Barley Vegetable, Rich & Hearty New England Clam Chowder, Traditional Chicken Cheese Enchilada Flavor, Vegetable Classics Cream Mushroom, Vegetable Classics French Onion, Hearty Black Bean flavored with Bacon, Hearty Tomato.

For the few soups that have no meat in them, put whatever meat you want in there. 

To have one or more cornbread pancakes with your casserole soup, make them fast by making your batter however you make cornbread batter except leave off some of the liquid so it’s thick rather than runny.  Pat it into circles the size you can handle and put it in a hot skillet with a little oil and cook each one like a pancake.

I’ve added other prep items, but I have to check my brain to see what they were.  Oh, yes, I remember one now.  I’ll think of the others, and write another article about these.




Offline LvsChant

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #195 on: July 31, 2012, 06:01:33 AM »
Love your articles, Victoria... thanks so much for sharing. (I've really got to get myself a machete for the zombies...)

Offline TexDaddy

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #196 on: July 31, 2012, 08:26:16 AM »
...I've really got to get myself a machete for the zombies...
We have HIS and HERS.  8)

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #197 on: July 31, 2012, 12:00:01 PM »
A POTPOURRI OF NEW PREP EQUIPMENT

WaterBob:
Buy one or two ($19.97 each).  Why should you buy one or two?  Because each one is 100 gallons of your good water in a small package.  The small package just sits in your house until you need it.  If you know a disaster is coming, like a hurricane or a predicted ice storm or other storm that might wipe out power so water won’t be in your faucets or that water could be polluted, unfold the food grade heavy duty plastic WaterBob, place it in a bathtub, use the connection it has to hook to your tub faucet, fill it up and seal it.  There is a syphon pump with it so you can get water out of it when you want it.

My WaterBob package sits under a sink in the bathroom.  I can have 100 gallons of water quickly by filling this up.  If you don’t use a WaterBob and you just fill up your bathtub, you have whatever crud is on your tub in that water (soap scum/dead skin cells/remains of cleaner, etc.).  That unclean water is fine to use to flush a toilet (however the water will slowly drain out of a tub), but the WaterBob gives you good drinking/cooking water.

When I found this WaterBob, just as hurricane season was starting this year, I immediately tried to buy one – the company is in Florida.  They were out, wouldn’t have any more until the next month.  I checked back that next month and they still didn’t have them – the date was pushed to the next month. No place on the web had one – they were waiting to get them from the Florida company.  I kept looking and found one place that had a few.  This company is located just down the street from the company that makes them.  I ordered one.

When the Florida company got a new batch, they were immediately sold out. I figured they had so many orders from companies for resell, they sold them all immediately.  The cheapest price for these great WaterBobs is http://www.hurricaneprepper.com/.   You won’t find a price cheaper than this $19.97.  If you want this, buy it/them now.  If a hurricane forms before this season is over, this Florida company will be sold out.

I like that package sitting in that bathroom – I know I’ve got 100 gallons of good water in the short time it takes to fill that bag. 

A disclaimer:  I have no connection to any company.  I look for the lowest price of items, and choose whatever company that is.  If I see an item on Amazon, I then search the web for a lower price and if I don’t find it, I use Amazon. 


Solar light for inside your house:
There is a company that makes a solar light for use inside a house.  These are used in countries that have no other power or they have trouble finding kerosene.  US organizations who work in these third world countries, take these lights with them, use them, then donate them to the people when they leave.

One sits the light in the sun during the day, then brings it in at night and it lights a room.  I got two of these lights plus the one that concentrates light into a sort of small spotlight for reading or doing other close work.  These lights are at http://www.dlightstore.com/.   The lantern light is d.light S10 Solar Lantern $15.95 USD.  The concentrated light is d.light S1Compact Solar Lantern $11.95 USD.  The lights were charged when I received them.  I put one in a window to leave it there so it would stay charged.

Instant Screen Door:
This is a lesson I learned after Hurricane Ike.  I don’t have a screen door at my front door or for my sliding glass door on the back of house.  When power was out, I couldn’t leave these doors open for air circulation or mosquitoes and other bugs would come in.  I didn’t want mosquito bites all over me and in Texas that would surely happen.

I searched for attachable screen doors.  There are a number of these but most are junk.  The two I got are “Instant Screen Door” brand – according to customer comments, they work and stay in place.  They are in their small boxes ready to be put up.  One just uses the tension rod included, and places it at the top of the door frame and it’s in use.  If it is too long for your door, just fold some around the tension rod until it’s the right length.  I got these from Amazon.  Please don’t buy the junk ones – you don’t want the screen falling down or not sealing property with the magnets on the two panels that meet in the middle.  Don’t get the ones with sticky stuff on them to use to hang them up – they will fall down.  You could use thumb tacks to keep those up but you will have spaces between the thumb tacks where bugs could likely get in.  Besides, I’m not strong enough to push thumb tacks into wood.  If you put them in sheetrock they will come out.  Avoid all that trouble, and get the ones with the tension rod included.

Now, I have to think to remember if I’ve added other emergency items since my last articles.  I need to do better for you and start a list to add items when I get new preps.



Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #198 on: July 31, 2012, 12:32:51 PM »
Okay, I have three important medical items I added.  I'll get that info. together and post that. 

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #199 on: July 31, 2012, 02:28:56 PM »
IMPORTANT MEDICAL SUPPLIES

Celox:
“Stops bleeding fast.”  That is the reason you need to get this.  If there is a severe bleeding wound and you can’t get to a doctor, this will save your life.  It is also recommended for people who take blood thinners as they will continue to bleed more than others and it’s harder to stop their bleeding.  This is the lifesaving material used on the battlefield to stop bleeding.

I have friends in the Texas hill country and they live on top of a mountain out in the boonies.  He takes blood thinner.  I made sure they got Celox for him as anytime he bleeds is an emergency if it is anything more than a scratch. 

The package I got from Amazon has ten packets in it.  It was $29.69.  That might sound expensive for ten packets but each packet can save a life.

You can also buy small sheets infused with Celox to place a sheet over a wound but I read extensively about this and the sheets aren’t as quick to stop blood, plus they cost more.  If you were hiking in the wilderness, the sheets make sense as they would be easier to use.  However, at home, you open the packet and pour it into the wound.  The clotting starts almost immediately.

So, Celox is for right now if you need to stop bleeding, and it’s essential if you can’t get to a doctor.  If TSHTF, you need Celox.

Steri-Strips:
These are cheap on Amazon.  I’ve mentioned these in the medical article.  They hold a wound together better than butterfly strips.  I haven’t found them in drug stores, only butterfly ones.  If a wound is gaping, laid open, the skin needs to be pulled together.  Clean the wound, apply an antibiotic cream or ointment, pull the skin together and apply steri-strips all along the wound to hold the skin together.  If you can get to a doctor, this wound will likely require stitches.  If there is no doctor, at least the skin is together.  You can buy stitching needles and suture thread but I’m not about to stitch skin without being able to dull the pain of doing that.  I’m using steri-strips in an emergency situation.

Antibiotics:
You will have to make a decision about this one.   I kept reading about fish antibiotics and read an article by a doctor saying these are the same antibiotics used for humans and are made by the same companies that make antibiotics for humans.  I looked at many fish websites but didn’t find any that had Cipro but thought my fish needed it.  :)  Through reading, I found one company that includes Cipro along with the rest.  The website with all these antibiotics is http://www.fishmoxfishflex.com/ .  If the SHTF and there is no other way to get these antibiotics for your fish, perhaps you should store some, whichever type your fish might need.  You can check out this website and determine if you want any of this product for your fish.  Many preppers have these.

As an interesting aside, I read that people used to buy antibiotics for dogs and take those.  Then, the CDC made dog antibiotics only available by prescription.

My next article will not be about products.  It will be what I think about our country’s situation now and how that affects us.

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #200 on: August 04, 2012, 11:48:56 AM »
SOLVING YOUR WORLD’S PROBLEMS

Note, I didn’t say solving THE world’s problems, I said solving YOUR world’s problems. 

I used to instruct in Texas Election Law to Republican county chairs and Republican election judges and clerks.  Guess what – I’m not talking politics in this article.  I do not care if you are Republican, Democrat, Independent, whatever.

Neither you nor I can “fix” the world or this country – it’s too far gone.

We can blame this or that political party; we can blame Iran or China or Russia or Greece or Spain.  We can blame radical Islamists; we can blame terrorists from any country.  We can blame Obama (okay, let’s do that).  Obama, however, is just speeding up the inevitable collapse of our country.   

Benjamin Franklin correctly saw our nation's destiny when he said, "When the people find they can vote themselves money, that will herald the end of the republic."  From 1776 to 2012 is 236 years.  It took that long for us to vote ourselves and others enough money to destroy the country because that money was borrowed and cannot be repaid and we’re spending more than we take in now, so the debt grows larger every day.  The country is already bankrupt so we keep borrowing more money to keep the country’s lights on.  One day in the not distant future, banks will fail, money cannot be exchanged, and that causes trucks to stop.  That is the biggest and most likely threat we face as a country.  Within a few days of that happening, people start dying and I don’t want you to be one of them.

You can add other possible destructive happenings like EMP, terror strikes, etc., if you want, but they all lead to the same thing – collapse of the monetary system in the country and no trucks.  (I didn’t give you an option of blaming global warming – if you believe that, see me about sea shore property in Arizona.)

If you are going to grieve over the collapse of this great country, do it now.  I have already done that by researching where the country is and whether it can survive and I have determined it can’t, and I felt sad about that.  How could this country fall, not this country, not this great country.  This country is held up by Styrofoam posts and they are sinking in quicksand and it can’t be stopped.  I kept reading and thinking until I could accept the fact that this country is over.  Historically, no country has stayed on top.  I read history to understand why every leading country failed.  Over extension of services took Rome down – they were ruling too many countries and over extended, which means not enough money to keep going.  The same thing happened to England – they got too big ruling too many countries and over extended themselves.  Now, over extension has happened to us – not enough money.

When the country implodes, your world is all that matters.  The rest of the world will keep doing something but we don’t care at that time because our private daily world needs to keep going IN A GOOD WAY.   Yes, a good way.

I do not want you freaking out and depressing yourself.  Let’s solve depression right now.  Note, I said “depressing yourself”.  Unless you have a chemical imbalance in your brain, the only person who can make you depressed, is you.  No one can get in your head and punch buttons.  Only you can do that, so you are the one in control of your mind.  It’s not what happens to you that makes you depressed, it’s what you do in your mind about what happened, that causes you to depress yourself, or not.  Since you are in control of your mind, if you want to depress yourself, set a time limit for being depressed.  “Do I want to depress myself for a day, or two days, or a week, or a…”  Since only you can depress yourself, only you can put a limit on how long you want to depress yourself.  See, you have control over your mind and that’s great.  I just gave you total control of yourself and that’s a good thing (send $65 for this counseling session - that’s a cut rate from $100).   

The point is, you can make YOUR personal world the way you want it to be because you are in control of it – no one else.  That is what preps are all about – creating your world when the larger world collapses.  You are also prepared for regional disasters from weather or other reasons.

I sit here and look out on my world and it’s working just fine.  The bank on the corner is open, people are civil and at their jobs, buying groceries, going to restaurants and movies – everything is just perking along swell.  This is normal.  You need to think about “not normal” so you won’t be surprised when “not normal” happens.

Many people can’t get past “normalcy”.  Mentally, they won’t accept “not normal”, so they cling onto normal and do nothing.  If they do nothing, then they mentally stay in normal.  To accept “not normal”, is too upsetting for them.  These will be the people who have nothing when “not normal” happens.  If a physical emergency happens, they will be the first to die because they can’t move – they are stuck in place hanging onto normal when it is not there.

Think about this:  The power goes off in your house – what is the first thing you will do – the very first thing?  Will you stand there not moving because you can’t think of the first thing to do?  Normalcy just left you and you are stuck in place.  The faster you get out of being stuck, the better chance you have of surviving anything.

If you read about my first floor flooding with water, you read about being stuck in normalcy.  It was a shock and I had brain freeze and it took some minutes before I could react.  What did I do – I sat down with coffee and cigarette and viewed my world and I didn’t want that water there – I wanted it to be gone as though it didn’t happen, but it was still there.  I could not wish it away.  It was going to stay there UNTIL I TOOK ACTION.  If I had stayed in normalcy/denial, I would be wading through water today.

There is a battery small lantern on the table next to my chair.  If power goes out after dark, my first action is to grab that lantern and punch it on.  I just got rid of the dark and I can move to do whatever I need to do.  Arrange your world so you can respond quickly.

Mental practice of putting your world together when the outside world crashes for whatever reason, will make you better able to move quickly.  By this, I mean to think of your house in operation when “not normal” happens.  Think of being happy that you can put your world together.  You will have good water, good food and be fairly comfortable.  Revel in this good place.  It doesn’t matter what’s happening in Washington, D.C., or some other state, or the rest of your state or the rest of your county or the rest of your town.  You have your world put together and you are proud of it.  You rule your world because you made it that way.  Mentally live in your house with your preps working.  Visualize how it will look, how it will feel, the tasks you will perform.  If you mentally practice this, you will move when an emergency happens because you have already done it in your mind.

You are not going to be in denial and mentally freeze.  You see the situation as it is and you know what to do.  You have preps to make this work. 

Prepping your body:
You know what – I didn’t want to have that eye surgery on my eyes.  What if I had put that off, seeing worse all the time, then the country collapsed and I couldn’t get it done.  Why, I might have depressed myself if that happened. ;D

Consider the health of all your parts.  Are you putting off something you couldn’t get done if trucks stopped, making doctors stop?  You must be able to see and your arms and legs need to work.  If you have arthritis that affects your arms/hands or your knees/legs, and you haven’t done anything about that, see an arthritis doctor, called a Rheumatology doctor.  Is there something wrong with your feet?  Something a Podiatrist could fix?  Get it done.  Get your body working as well as it can.

Now we have fixed your mind to accept what may come (you can be happy because you are prepared) and you are going to fix your body. 

The next article is to give you tips on how to navigate a hospital to get what you want for yourself or a loved one.  These tips are based on the psychological mindset of the people working there.  I have used these methods over and over in hospitals when my husband was there over the years.  One tip also works in restaurants when you are in line to be seated.






Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #201 on: August 05, 2012, 03:19:21 PM »
psst- JUST BETWEEN US ABOUT HOSPITALS

This article is not about emergency preps. for a disaster.  It is about medical emergencies that happen at any time between now and including during a disaster if the hospital is open.

Most of these suggestions are based on the psychological mindset of doctors/nurses/attendants who work in emergency rooms and in and around regular hospital rooms.  If you want to be super nice and not bring attention to yourself or your sick loved one, don’t bother reading this.  If you want the best outcome for your sick loved one, you need to harden up and do what it takes to get the best outcome for the sick person.  You most probably won’t know the medical people at a hospital, but you do know your patient.  Your loyalty is to your patient, not those working at a hospital.  When your loved one leaves the hospital, you’ll never see those exact hospital personnel again, so keep your patient as No. 1, whatever you have to do to get him/her the best care.  First, we’ll consider emergency rooms, then consider regular hospital rooms.

Emergency Rooms
My husband’s health was poor for a number of years and required a number of emergency trips to the hospital.  You have probably experienced something like this – the emergency health problem happens when you can’t get to your doctor – that means after doctor hours, during the night, and on the weekend.  There are two choices to get to an emergency room – your car or an ambulance and I’ve done both a number of times.  Navigating the system in emergency rooms is an art to learn. 

First, don’t go to an emergency room unless it is a genuine emergency.  I am defining “emergency” as something life threatening (suspected heart attack, breathing difficulty, patient unresponsive), severe accident (bone broken, cut that needs stitches), or terrible pain you can’t stop no matter what is causing it.

Have you been to an emergency room lately, as in the last several years?  I have experienced those rooms in two different hospitals over and over.  Let’s say you decide to drive your loved one to the emergency room rather than call 911 for an ambulance.  If you are on Medicare with supplemental insurance, do not drive there – call 911.  Medicare will pay for the ambulance and your loved one will not experience the waiting room as ambulance patients are taken directly to the back where the doctors are.  There are problems in the back but we’ll go over those shortly.  If you are not on Medicare, the cost of the ambulance is roughly $600+.  You would need to check your insurance to see what portion of that you would have to pay.

Let’s say you drive your loved one to the emergency room – I’ve done that.  Now, you have to get your patient from the car into the emergency room.  If the patient can’t walk to that room, you have to leave the patient in the car, go inside and request help, which would be a wheelchair and someone to help you get the patient in the chair.  All this takes time and the patient isn’t getting any better during this time. 

You will see people in that room, waiting for care for colds/flu, all types of bacterial and viral infections, and minor accidents of all types.  Most do not have insurance and that’s why they are there.  Now, if one came in bleeding from an artery, that person would be taken back immediately for care.  In other words, if the event is life threatening, the person won’t be sitting in that room.

If you have to wait there with your patient, put the patient as far away from those waiting as possible.  That room is full of disease.  People coughing with flu, send those germs through the air and you do not want to be in the path of those germs.  If you pick up germs and get sick, you can’t give proper care to your patient and you don’t want the patient to catch these diseases.  Don’t touch any surfaces unless you have to.  If you see anti-bacterial wash for your hands (that stuff is everywhere now, on the counter where an attendant talks to you or on the wall around that area), put it on your hands and do that just before you leave.  You do not want germs to get on your car steering wheel or pass these germs to your patient.

Now, you have to navigate the attendant in the window to try to get your patient to the back as fast as possible.  The attendant has guidelines to follow to determine when your patient gets to the back.  Look as concerned as you can, short of panic or not.  You have to show insurance cards, oh, you have insurance – that is a plus for the attendant – you’re not a freeloader like most of the rest in that room.  When you describe what is wrong with your patient, make it sound as horrible as you can.  The more horrible, the faster you get to the back. 

Okay, you have given the information and the horrible thing/things wrong with your patient.  What do you do now?  If your patient is in a wheel chair, place that chair as close to the attendant window as you can and you look anxious and stare at the attendant and don’t stop staring at that person as you sit there by your patient.  If patient isn’t in wheelchair,  put chairs where you can see the attendant and do your staring.  You want that attendant to become uncomfortable and to get rid of that uncomfortable feeling, the attendant will concentrate on getting you out of there to the back.

People react to someone staring at them and they will get that person away from them as soon as possible.  That is what you want.  This also works when you go in a restaurant and sign your name on the waiting list.  Do not go to the bar to wait – that assures you aren’t getting in for a while.  You are spending money for the drinks and you are out of sight of the attendant.  Stay where the attendant is, and stare at the attendant with a pitiful look if you can manage that.  You will get seated by the attendant as soon as possible to get you out of her/his sight.

Now, we’re back at the emergency room and you got to the back where doctors are.  Patients who came by ambulance are already there.  Just because you got back there, doesn’t mean your patient will get immediate attention.  There are a number of patients there and, to the nurses and doctors, you are just one in a line.  We have to fix that, do something to call attention to your patient.  Your “room” is likely a space with curtains on all sides to make the “walls”.  If you sit behind those curtain walls, you are invisible and so is your patient.  Stand outside the curtains and stare at all who are close by.  The doctors/nurses do not want you standing there.  You are messing up their plan (that’s what we want to do).  If there is a counter with nurses behind there, or you see a doctor, speak up.  Say something like, “My husband/wife needs help right now – I think he/she is dying!”

The operative/magic word is “dying”.  One of those medical people will go to that room right then.  That starts your patient’s care.  The medical people entered the room, now they have to deal with it.

One of my actual experiences:  My husband had horrible pain.  Had to get him to emergency room.  Got in the back, and no one was doing anything for this patient almost screaming with pain.  I left that area to get better cell phone reception, plus I didn’t want those medical people hearing my call.  I called our doctor’s office which got me to the answering service.  I said, “This is Dr. (my name), and Dr. (our doctor’s name) and I have a patient at the emergency room and I need to speak with Dr. ___ right now.  Answering service person took my name and number, and I hung up and Dr. ____ called me in less than 5 minutes.  I told him the situation and no one was doing anything for husband.  He said he would call there right now and get something done.  Then, he said, “How did you manage to get to me?”  Told him what I did and he said you can’t do that.  I said I’ll do it again if I need you.  He said, no, don’t do that, here is my home number.

You see, I didn’t care what anyone said or thought of me, I was going to get his pain stopped one way or another.  You have to have determination and I had it in spades that day.  When I got back to his fabric room, they were already giving him an IV with morphine to stop his pain.  Eventually, he was taken to a hospital room.

After that experience, I thought about a way to cause these hospital people to pay attention to me so I could get what husband needed.  I had a lovely pin that had Dr. (my name) in black letters on it so the name stood out.  I was not a medical doctor, was an education type, and I never professed to anyone to be a medical doctor.  I put that pin on a white shirt.  The next time husband had to go to emergency room, I called 911 to get him to the back.  I put on my white shirt with the pin, and drove there behind the ambulance.

I walked in the back like I belonged there, no one questioned my going through that door, and he got help immediately, helped due to that shirt/pin.  I said nothing about it.  Think about the mindset of hospital people – they are geared to white – white gets their attention.  Anyone less than a doctor who works there, knows doctors are god and they better treat doctors like gold.  Doctors themselves know they are in a class by themselves and everyone who is a doctor is in their club.   The doctor who came to treat husband, told me every little step he was taking and I would say, “Good, that’s the thing to do” and statements like that.  To him, I was in his club and his instant friend.

You can increase your odds of getting medical help, if you wear a white shirt with any name plate on it.  They will likely think you work there in some capacity.  You could also buy hospital type pants and shirt (called scrubs), the kind they wear in hospitals.  You will likely get accepted fast as one of them and get good service.  If someone asks you why you are dressed that way or where do you work, you say that’s what you wear around the house because they are comfortable.  See, you are not claiming to be anything, you are just playing into their psychological mindset.

Regular Hospital Rooms
This also works in regular hospital rooms.  There are the nurses at the desk and they respond to white and scrubs so they will want to help you. 

How To Get Out Of A Regular Hospital Room Faster
Your loved one is ready to go home.  The nurses don’t care when you leave as they are through with you.  There is a lot of paper work to be done before a patient can leave.   The nurses see no reason to push doing this, so they are lax about getting it done.  You, on the other hand, are waiting, waiting, waiting, for the paper work to get done.

Here’s what I did:  Husband is ready to go, in wheelchair, wanting to get out of there.  I’ve packed up his stuff that was in the room.  We wait and wait.  Finally, I had enough.  Told him I was rolling him out to the nurses’ area, and he should ask for a Coke.  We went to front of nurses’ desk.  He asks for a Coke.  A nurse had to go get it.  Husband got Coke and I stared at the nurses.  I said to nurse, “It’s getting about time for lunch.  Should he have lunch here in the chair or should we go back to the room?”  A nurse took off with the paperwork and came back and we left.

You want to be an irritant, cause nurses to be uncomfortable.  They will get you out of there so they don’t have to deal with you anymore.

Final note about this:  If you think any method I used was “harsh”, then don’t do it.  Do remember them so when you are in these situations, you can use them.  I don’t regret one thing I did and would do it again (any nurse reading this likely doesn’t agree with me and I don’t care).  It’s the hospital/doctors with many patients, and you are just one person trying to get help for your loved one.  I will use every advantage I have to cut through the maze of hospital/doctors and help my loved one.

Offline Sweethearts Mom

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #202 on: August 05, 2012, 03:57:06 PM »
These are amazing articles. thank you

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #203 on: August 08, 2012, 10:45:05 PM »
A NOTE

Sometime tomorrow, I’ll post an article on how to get medical records from private doctors and hospitals as the two systems are different.

This note, however, is to tell you I am really hurt by what you did.  One or more of you went to my Kroger store and bought every can of thick, swell, Progresso Hearty Chicken Corn Chowder soup.  I insist you take those cans back to my Kroger along with an apology for buying them ALL.  ;D

I now have to wait for a truck to bring more.  What if something happens to stop trucks and I never get another can of Chicken Corn Chowder?  I was going to store some of this soup and now I am bereft of that particular soup.

“be·reft
[ bi réft ]
deprived: deprived of somebody or something loved or valued
lacking: lacking in something desirable or necessary
feeling sense of loss: filled with a sense of loss”

See, I am bereft.  I’ll let you know when I find that soup again at my Kroger store.

Offline TexDaddy

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #204 on: August 08, 2012, 11:10:06 PM »
I solemly swear I have never purchased a can of Chicken Corn Chowder from Kroger or any other source.  ;D

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #205 on: August 08, 2012, 11:21:06 PM »
"I solemly swear I have never purchased a can of Chicken Corn Chowder from Kroger or any other source." 

OK Tex, you are off the hook.  You can't return it if you didn't buy it.  However, you should try it or any of the other Rich and Hearty Progresso soups. :)

Offline TexDaddy

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #206 on: August 09, 2012, 01:04:30 AM »
Actually, I have a pretty good stash of Progresso soups. Mostly kinds with beef in them, though.

Offline markl32

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #207 on: August 09, 2012, 11:08:23 AM »


Then, I asked myself how was I going to wear this gun on my person?  I looked on Amazon for fanny packs.  I didn’t know jack about fanny packs so I educated myself.  I settled on one by “Galati Gear” for about $25.  This is called the small one and there is also medium and large. There are two zippered pockets on the front, and another larger zippered one on the top.  The gun fits in a pocket in the back and that closes with strong Velcro.  It looks like a usual fanny pack and will carry all important items you need if you go shopping.  Think about it – you would have two free hands, no purse to carry, if you used this.  Also, there is no purse snatching if you wear this. These are not gender specific, a man still looks like a macho guy with his fanny pack.  There are many fanny packs on Amazon but not a huge number for a gun one but there are still plenty to choose from.

You absolutely cannot tell a gun is in this fanny pack.  If you had to use your gun, just jerk down on the Velcro and the gun is in your hand immediately.  In a SHTF situation, just wear the fanny pack at home and your gun is with you no matter where you are.



I just found this thread and started in on the 7th page.  I look forward to reading the rest of it! 

I must say though - a fanny pack screams gun.  While yes, you can not actually see the gun, 100% of men and 90% of women wearing a fanny pack are carrying a gun.  When you wear a fanny pack everyone knows whats in there. 

I think the fanny pack may actually beat out the "photo journalist" vest for the top honors of concealing a gun from view while advertising to EVERYONE that you have a gun. 

I think the ruger light weight .38 is a fantastic choice for a carry gun.  I urge you to look at better methods of concealment such as (in no particular order:

http://www.copsplus.com/ankleholsters.php

http://www.smartcarry.com/

http://www.511tactical.com/All-Products/Shirts/Undergear-Shirts/Holster-Shirt.html?gclid=CLDt15-B27ECFUU0QgodZDEAww

http://concealedcarryclothingstore.com/

And I assume from the little I have read that you are a woman over 50.  Woman over 50 styles of clothing is very often conducive to regular old hip carry - either inside the waist band or outside the waist band.  I often see older women dressed vert stylishly and think I could conceal an arsenal under that... 

And my last bit of advice is to apply your own advice to buying a handgun to buying concealed carry gear - Don't go cheap on stuff that may some day save your life.  Cheap carry gear just sucks.  Its not comfortable.  It typically has poor gun retention.  And it will not last long or work that well.  The only exception to this is the $12 glock sports holster, but even that needs to ride on a sturdy belt. 

I hope you find this helpful. 

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #208 on: August 09, 2012, 12:01:53 PM »
Mark132:  Thanks for your post.  If someone thinks I may have a gun in my fanny pack, that person is going to leave me alone and that's a good thing.

Offline Victoria

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Re: After years of prepping and still going - by Victoria
« Reply #209 on: August 09, 2012, 12:09:12 PM »
MEDICAL RECORDS – HOW TO GET THEM WITHOUT BECOMING A PAUPER

In the last few years, I have dealt with six hospitals and multiple private practice doctors and records had to go between doctors in private practice and from hospital to hospital.  This article depicts what I learned about medical records.  As the statement goes, “Your mileage may vary” when you have to do this.   

There are two types of medical records.  One type is made when you go to your regular doctor.  The other type is a hospital record when you have something done there. 

Medical records made when you go to your regular doctor:
If you have to change your regular doctor and get a new one, sign a release at the new doctor’s office and they will get your records at no charge to you.  If you get those records yourself from your old doctor, you have to pay an amount of money for each page.  Let your new doctor get them.

Hospital records:
Let’s say your loved one has to have a procedure done at a hospital, then you need those records to go to another hospital or doctor.  You have to get them yourself and hand carry them to wherever you need them to go.  So, you go to the hospital records department.  You get a sheet of paper to fill out to request the records.  You put the patient’s name on it along with address, birthdate, etc..

Then there is a list to choose what records you want – a really long list.  Aha!, there is a box to check “All”.  Wow, just check that box and you’re done.  DON’T DO THAT.  You have to pay for each page.  That cost consists of paying for the time someone takes to copy the records, plus the cost of all that paper and you won’t know the total cost until you pick up the records because you won’t know the total number of pages until then.  You definitely don’t know how many pages are in “All”. 

From the time you first enter a hospital for a procedure or illness, a record is made of absolutely everything until you leave that hospital.  What is everything?    Numerous records are made when you check into the hospital and records made when you get in a room.  A record is made every time a nurse comes in your room to do anything such as give you a medication, check your vital signs, everything is recorded every time, page after page.  When you have the procedure if you have one, a record is made by anyone assisting in that room.  The antitheist makes multiple records as does the doctor or doctors assisting, before they ever touch you.  Records are made during the procedure.  Records are made after the procedure.  Records are made when you are taken back to your room.  Records, records.  A record is made every time your doctor enters your room.  Dismissal records are made.  You can easily have hundreds of pages of records before you are out of that hospital. 

Experience getting hospital records: 
I looked at that check sheet to get records, and saw that “All” box.  I almost checked it.  Then, I thought better of that and looked at the list of records I could check individually.  This particular time, I needed to take these records to MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.  I chose the records I knew I had to have – records as to how he was when they took him to surgery made by the doctor and antitheist, records made during the  procedure and the records made by the surgeon after the surgery.  He had two procedures which took two days and the procedures were done by two different surgeons. 

The records would be ready the next day.  When I got them the next day, the cost was something over $100.

What happens when you check “All”:
When I was there deciding which records to check, an elderly man came in and was handed a sheet of paper to check to get records.  He looked ill, was shaky and moving very slowly.  I thought he must have checked, “All”, because he was done almost immediately filling out that paper and hobbling out.

When I got there the next day to get the records, that elderly man was there and sitting down with a distressed/shocked/dismayed look.  An attendant from records was standing by him.  There was a huge stack of paper there, about 12 inches high and I heard the attendant say the cost and it was well over $1,000.  I felt so sorry for this guy.  Why didn’t they give him direction when he was filling out that paper for records?  I left the room with him still sitting there with that huge stack of paper and the attendant standing by him. 

After I left, I thought the elderly man should have thrown that huge stack of paper at the attendant because they should have helped him when he filled out the form.  I also thought I should open an office in front of that hospital and counsel every person before they entered the hospital – tell them pretty much what I wrote in the other emergency room/hospital article before this one, and tell them about records.

Because I was dealing with numerous hospitals and doctors, I made a copy of those records when I got home.  Now, I could deliver records to numerous doctors and hospitals because I always had an extra copy.  Never give away your only copy of a record. Always make another copy.

Tips about your personal medical records: 
Maybe you say you don’t have any.   Yes, you do, you just haven’t put it on paper. 

Medicine sheet:
Make a list of all medicines you take.  Type it and save it on your computer.  If you don’t have a file called “Medical” or something like that, make one to save your medical information.  On your medicine list, at the top of the sheet, type your name AND birthdate, and the name of your pharmacy and the phone number.  List every medicine, the strength of the medicine and how often you take it, even over the counter ones you take, and after the prescribed medicine, type the name of the doctor who gave you that prescription.  After you have listed all the medicines, add any allergies you have.

Doctor sheet:
If you have multiple doctors, type a sheet with your name AND birthdate at the top, and list each doctor on there and their address and phone number and type a short note saying what that doctor treats for you.   One word could do it, such as “Diabetes”.

Medical history sheet: 
Every time you go to a new doctor or you have to go to the hospital, there is that stack of papers you have to fill out.  Somewhere in those sheets, they want to know every procedure you ever had – they want a year and what it was.  How can you possibly drag those dates of years and everything you have ever had done, out of your mind at that time?  While you are at home with no pressure, so you can think about it – make a sheet called, “Medical History” with your name AND birthdate at the top.  Then, list the most current year and procedure you had done or the illness you had.  Under that, list the year and procedure of another treatment.  Keep doing that, until your medical history is all on there.

Print a copy of all these sheets.  Print two copies of your medicine sheet and one doctor sheet and one medical history sheet, and put them in a folder and carry that folder every time you go to a doctor.  There is another reason to have this folder.  If you have a medical emergency and have to go to the emergency room, you have your personal medical records with you and they want to know all that.

Now, before you next go to your doctor, take a look at your medicine sheet – have you changed any medication or added one, to that list?  Print two new copies if you have to change it.  When the nurse comes in to do your blood pressure, she will look at your records and asked about medicine – hand her your up to date medicine sheet.  When the doctor comes in, he’s going to look at your medicine sheet.  You also have a copy because you made two copies and you can talk intelligently about your medicines.

When you go to a new doctor and have all those sheets to fill out, just use your medicine sheet and medical history sheet and write, “See attached sheet”, in those sections of their paperwork that ask for that.  You may also need to include your doctor sheet if they want the names of all your doctors.

Now, you know about records and I feel better because you know it.