Author Topic: Glue / Rubber bullets  (Read 4164 times)

Offline CountryRootsCityJob

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Glue / Rubber bullets
« on: June 10, 2011, 10:51:31 AM »
Okay you guys, here's another question for ya...

ONLY USE PRIMERS WITH RUBBER/GLUE BULLETS! (NO POWDER)

I've seen rubber bullets here and there and wondered if you guys have tried them and what your experience has been if so.

Also, I saw the videos on youtube for glue bullets (hot glue gun sticks are just about .45" diameter).  I tried them, but they left some nasty cleanup in the barrel... otherwise fun!  But I had another idea... what about taking that hot glue gun and squirting it into a bullet mold?  That way you can use them for other calibers...

What do you guys think?  They are kinda fun for just plinking in the backyard where true loads wouldn't be safe...  ( and assuming nobody calls Mayberry PD on you)

~CRCJ

Offline Steve Cover

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Re: Glue / Rubber bullets
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2011, 12:23:00 AM »
Okay you guys, here's another question for ya...

ONLY USE PRIMERS WITH RUBBER/GLUE BULLETS! (NO POWDER)

I've seen rubber bullets here and there and wondered if you guys have tried them and what your experience has been if so.

Also, I saw the videos on youtube for glue bullets (hot glue gun sticks are just about .45" diameter).  I tried them, but they left some nasty cleanup in the barrel... otherwise fun!  But I had another idea... what about taking that hot glue gun and squirting it into a bullet mold?  That way you can use them for other calibers...

What do you guys think?  They are kinda fun for just plinking in the backyard where true loads wouldn't be safe...  ( and assuming nobody calls Mayberry PD on you)

~CRCJ

The hot glue idea has been around for a while.  If you are willing to do the work, and then address the cleanup, it should work OK.

Personally, I've been unimpressed with rubber bullets.  For some reason they are not accurate in my gun.

Speer makes an all plastic Target 38 & Target 44 cartridge.  Speer's (Plastic) Target 45 bullet requires the buyer to modify regular APC brass by enlarging the flash hole.
I own a couple hundred of each. 
The plastic bullets just barely touch the rifling (you can easily push one down the barrel with a dowel) so a high level of accuracy is not there.
However, back in the early 70s when I wore a badge, I burned up a lot of primers in my garage drawing from my duty holster and firing from the hip as fast as I could.
My target was suspended from the ceiling fifteen feet away by a couple of lengths of twine attached to clothespins. 
My backstop was an old Army blanket also hung from the ceiling a foot or so behind the target.
The plastic bullets would pass through the target, be caught by the limp blanket and drop undamaged into a box I had on the floor.
After a wipedown, they were ready for reloading again.
I burnt up more than several bricks of large pistol primers that way.

However, the vast bulk of my primer powered plinking ammunition is wax.

I got the idea from Bill Jordan's book No Second Place Winner.
Bill was a Border Patrolman who also did exhibition shooting.
On stage he fired primer powered wax bullets.
In his book he showed how he made them.

Not one to go half way, I enlarged the flash hole on boxes of several different cartridges.
These I marked the rims with a small triangular jeweler's file so I would know never to put powder in them.
My first batch was with re-sized brass.... I later discovered that this was unnecessary.
For me, fired brass that still chambered works best.

I form 1/2" thick bars of canning wax, by lining the plastic cartridge box (Slip Top) with aluminum foil and pouring in the melted wax.  Once the wax cools, I remove it and clean up the edge with a knife.  These store in an Ammo Can until needed.

To load, I place my unprimed brass in a loading block mouth up. The wax is then warmed in the microwave until it is just rubbery.  It is then pressed down over the 50 cases until fully cut.
I use a dowel to push these wax bullets down about 1/8" and peel off the extra wax. (This gets thrown into the "remelt" coffee can.)
The brass are now charged with a primer and are ready to go.

Since the wax is so cheap, these become expendable bullets.

While the 32 ACP & 380 ACP works well with wax bullets, I have found that the 9mm Parabellum with its slightly tapered case does not. The wax bullets will sometimes fall into the case.  These are safe to shoot, of course, but not overly accurate.

I've shot wax in 32 ACP, 32 S&W Long, 380 ACP, 9mm (Poor results), 38 Spl, 357 magnum, 40 S&W, 41 Magnum, 44 Special & Magnum, and the 45 ACP.
Naturally, the semi autos do not cycle.  Also feeding an empty case from the magazine sometimes is a problem.

I'm a big fan of wax bullets.

One Caveat, Primers contain powdered glass. 
This is consumed by the high pressure and temperatures created in normal firing.
However, without these high temps and pressure, the powdered glass stays in the barrel.
I always ran a couple of patches through my barrel after every 10-12 rounds.
Also, I blew out the gap and area around the front of the cylinder with canned air.
At the end of the shooting session I would give my gun a detail cleaning.

There also is lead in primers.... Wash your hands well after shooting.

My 2 Cents

Steve
« Last Edit: June 12, 2011, 12:35:10 AM by Steve Cover »