Author Topic: Doomsday Preppers on NatGeo TV [merged topics]  (Read 283925 times)

Offline marauder

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #90 on: August 29, 2011, 11:16:36 AM »
Spot on Professor, spot on. +1

The thing is, somebody will eventually get it right. It's becoming too main stream not to. I'm sitting in Northern NJ and heard my Governor and the Mayor of New York City use the words "go bag" and "72 hour kit" about 150 times each between Thursday night and Saturday morning. Now, we can argue about the quality of advice the media gave as to the contents of the bag, but at least they put the thought into people's minds. And in my travels around prior to the storm, lots of people were taking the storm seriously and realized that the gubermint is not the best source of meeting your comfort needs. That said, the front page of my local paper chronicled dozens of stories of families that didn't evac that needed full fledge rescuing by the local first responders...alas, lots of work yet to be done...but as ll of us realize, preparedness is a mindset and a lifestyle, not a box of Mountain House and a shiny new generator...

Offline Doug

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #91 on: August 29, 2011, 08:10:36 PM »
Awww, come on Doug, what about all that "easy" energy tied up in those Canadian oil sands.
clicky for youtube on the truth

Everybody wants easy.  Nobody wants the truth.

yep. But even with pollution aside the tar sands will not meet the demand nor will it offset global declines.

The Economist
http://www.economist.com/node/17959688
"Despite rapid development in the past decade, the sands produce only 1.5m b/d, less than 2% of global supply. However, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), an industry group, expects output to be nearly 3.5m b/d by 2025"

So how could 3.5 million b/d offset the expected decline of 3-4 Saudi Arabias? Somebody might be saying, "But what about the 100's of billions of barrels of oil in the Bakken Shale?" Most of that is locked up in the tight shale. The USGS expects the Bakken to give up 3-4 billion total barrels over its lifetime (http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=1911). There's an industry estimated of 8 billion. Harold Ham (Continental Resources) says 24 billion. I don't know where Harold gets his figure from....but the US's current annual consumption is 7 billion barrels per year. So taking the very best guess means the Bakken would supply US consumption for less than 4 years.

I wonder how many posters on this board are also peak oilers? I'm kind of surprised there isn't category for peak oil discussions
 

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #92 on: August 29, 2011, 08:53:53 PM »
I agree that supply is getting to the point where if the world had continued on the 2000-2008 demand curve, we'd be looking at $200/barrel oil already.  The recession has done us one favor; by slowing global demand, it's buying those of us who know about it more time to prepare and make lifestyle changes.

I came here (TSP) via LATOC.  Frankly, I left LATOC because it's a depressing site to hang around for very long.  TSP is much more pro-active in building self-sufficiency and focused on building a better, more sustainable lifestyle.  I prefer the optimism here, but keep the Peaker mindset that time is not unlimited and we all have to remain focused on the direction we're going.

Regarding the show, I'm watching it right now (on DVR) and about to turn it off.  I think the first 35-40 minutes are great and educational, but I can already tell from the previews, it's about time to change the channel.  I think the show is poorly done on a network that is becoming notorious for focusing on entertainment from the mentally ill (TLC Channel).  It's obvious there's some very knowledgeable folks I have a lot to learn from on the show and I'm really enjoying the perspective of other preppers on the show who have taken things to the next level, but the production is low end.  There's no attempt to place things in perspective or context, there's no discussion, just the monologue of the preppers.  Frankly, there's no illusion of curiosity by the producers, it's just voyeurism into the lives of others.

Offline Doug

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #93 on: August 29, 2011, 09:40:29 PM »
Here's what I've told people I know personally about prepping, Endurance: If they think I'm a crank then they must also believe that the Pentagon's Brass is also a bunch of cranks since I'm of the same opinion/belief as their Joint Forces Command's JOE Report 2010....and then quote them that report. That report is reason enough to prep.

They have no comeback to that comment.

Dennis, if you are ever on another one of these show use that same comment, quote the JOE Report, and see if it gets edited out of the show.

I'm going to quote it again because I forgot to put the EIA link for how much oil the US consumes each day (19 million barrels ) and that 9+Million is consumed as gasoline

Pentagon
United States Joint Forces Command:
U.S. JOINT OPERATING ENVIRONMENT REPORT 2010
http://www.fas.org/man/eprint/joe2010.pdf
“A severe energy crunch is inevitable without a massive expansion of production and refining capacity. While it is difficult to predict precisely what economic, political, and strategic effects such a shortfall might produce, it surely would reduce the prospects for growth in both the developing and developed worlds. Such an economic slowdown would exacerbate other unresolved tensions, push fragile and failing states further down the path toward collapse, and perhaps have serious economic impact on both China and India. At best, it would lead to periods of harsh economic adjustment. To what extent conservation measures, investments in alternative energy production, and efforts to expand petroleum production from tar sands and shale would mitigate such a period of adjustment is difficult to predict. One should not forget that the Great Depression spawned a number of totalitarian regimes that sought economic prosperity for their nations by ruthless conquest...By 2012, surplus oil production capacity could entirely disappear, and as early as 2015, the shortfall in output could reach nearly 10 million barrels per day...The implications for future conflict are ominous, if energy supplies cannot keep up with demand and should states see the need to militarily secure dwindling energy resources.”

To put that 10 million shortfall into perspective, The US Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that out of approximately 19+ million barrels of oil the US consumes each day over 9 million barrels of oil is consumed as gasoline. IOW a shortfall of 10 million barrels world wide by 2015 would be the same as having every interstate highway to every Podunk road accross all 50 states vacant of gasoline powered autos. See column on the right: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=oil_use


I wonder if the producers are reading this thread?
« Last Edit: August 29, 2011, 09:52:54 PM by Doug »

endurance

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #94 on: August 30, 2011, 06:13:47 AM »
I wonder if the producers are reading this thread?
I doubt it.  The last I saw Discovery do a show on oil, it was what would happen if we suddenly one day just ran out.  Completely unrealistic scenario.  An adult handling of the topic is rare if not impossible.  It seems producers want to do a one hour program that neatly packages up the problem and the solution in one neat little package, even if that solution is unrealistic or the solution is to do nothing because the problem is too overwhelming.

Offline BadgerAngel

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #95 on: August 30, 2011, 08:01:19 AM »
So...why aren't we making one ourselves then?  I'm serious.
Forget Discovery and TLC.  Think more about Public Television.  The POV series, for example.  Those are privately made documentaries (yes, probably with grant money) that PBS puts on.
Start out with a documentary about prepping, linking it back to the way our forebears lived, show it coming full circle back to our generation.  The people who are learning how to can, and how to garden, and how to preserve food.  Avoid talking about TEOTWAKI, just talk about the everyday SHTF scenarios, linking it back to what Jack says -- that you're more likely to have a personal SHTF scenario than a mass one, that if you lose your job, or your spouse dies, these are good things to be able to fall back on until you get your feet back under you.

It's a thought, anyway.  No, we may not have big time equipment, but people make low-budget movies every single day.  Look at the first Paranormal Activity.  It cost $15,000 to make.  Take into consideration that most preppers would probably consent to be interviewed for free; that one can do video conferencing to get different preppers from opposite sides of the country, so in-person interviews are really not necessary; and nobody has to give their location that way if they're really worried about that. 

And now taking my nose back out of your conversation. ;)

Offline The Professor

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #96 on: August 30, 2011, 09:38:41 AM »
The problem is NOT with making one, it's with getting it seen on the level of Doomsday Preppers or even Living for the Apocalypse.  It's worse than getting a book published.

Basically, the idea is this: the channels show what they feel they can make money at.  If it's not sensational or "edgy," then they feel that no one will buy advertising on it.  Advertising generates cash and money makes the world go around.

Thinking of the opposite side, there's always making an independent movie, etc.  However, once again, the idea is to have people see it.

Currently, you could probably do an internet series on it, promote it through various websites and blogs, such as this. You may garner some interest. But, I'd suspect, it'd be from those already interested.

Making a movie or show like that costs money.  Unless you know of some eccentric, stupidly rich preppers out there with the desire to make such a show, I don't think it's going to pass the cost vs. benefits litmus test.

I think something like it will eventually happen, but it will be on a news channel as either a special or an educational endeavour.  If we could, for example, talk Fox News into it, then I think it would reach a lot of people.  BUT, you're giving over control of the presentation to FOX.  God knows who they'll pick to run with it (Can't you see Jerry Rivers. . .er, um, I mean Geraldo Rivera, doing an "expose" on prepping?).

There will come a time. . .

The Professor

endurance

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #97 on: August 30, 2011, 09:59:01 AM »
There will come a time. . .
When that time comes, there won't need to be a show on it on TV.  It would have to be called "this is how we live today". ::)

Offline Doug

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #98 on: August 30, 2011, 10:00:18 AM »
The Discovery Channel has think tank to do a legit program on peak oil http://dsc.discovery.com/earth/slideshows/peak-oil.html


The History Channel did a show about peak oil a few years back

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6g7-z6zsLA

BBC version (full show):
Part 1 of 6
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSQ0KtnaMVc&feature=related

Offline Oil Lady

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #99 on: August 30, 2011, 10:04:19 AM »
When that time comes, there won't need to be a show on it on TV.  It would have to be called "this is how we live today". ::)

Reality television without the television. ;) 




Offline Doug

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #100 on: August 30, 2011, 10:11:06 AM »
The whole point of a show is to knock people out of their "normalcy bias." That is a damn difficult thing to do...especially when you are also dealing with the 10-80-10 theory of survival psychology. 10% have a survival personality, 80% are like deer caught in the headlights looking to be lead, and the other 10% are the ones to be avoided at all cost since they're are the ones in constant denial about any problem. This 10% is the type who sit at the bar on the Titanic because they just knew the ship was unsinkable. Read The Survivors Club. Sherman talks about the 10-80-10 theory in the book.

modify: How many people just know that America is such an economic powerhouse that it, too, is unsinkable?

On normalcy bias, I just posted a show that aired on the History Channel. How many people did that wake up? The people I quote the JOE Report 2010 to know damn good and well they have no comeback to my quoting that report. They still don't overcome their bias to believing everything is normal.

Offline Doug

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #101 on: August 30, 2011, 10:18:37 AM »
And btw note that this program first mentions a terror attack on the Saudi's biggest terminal and the affect it have on the global economy http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6g7-z6zsLA

Well, according to the IEA's World Energy Outlook 2008 the global oil industry must put online the equivalent production equal to a Saudi Arabian production capacity every 5 years JUST to offset global decline rates.

Offline Oil Lady

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #102 on: August 30, 2011, 10:19:48 AM »

I wonder if the producers are reading this thread?

The best way to get any Hollywood  producer to read this thread is to stick that producer's name directly into this thread so that his name shows up in any Google searches he might launch on his own name. And just how often do Hollywood producers do Google searches on their own name? Well, here's what Oscar Wilde once said: "There's only one thing worse than being talked about, and that's NOT being talked about."


His name is Alan Madison, video producer and documentarian extraordinaire!

Here's what he had to say about his initial reaction to doing a show about preppers:

At first I was leery about doing the show Doomsday Preppers for National Geographic, about people who were preparing to survive the end of the world, because:

a) I did not particularly believe that the world was coming to an end anytime soon.

b) If it did, I was not sure that I particularly wanted to belong to the "I survived the end of the world" club.

And finally,

c) There couldn't be enough people to do a whole show, let alone a series, on who thought the world was coming to an end and if it did, wanted to survive.

In the hopes of a fun story I suppressed these doubts and jumped in. After some cursory research on the web and a few phone calls I found that "prepping" was not a small sect but a growing movement, with organizations in most every state, dedicated to helping and advising people on how to get ready for the end of the world as we know it (TEOTWAWKI as those in the prepping community call it).

How can so many people be so obsessed with something that is not going to happen?


Read more: http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/episode/doomsday-preppers-6202/Overview#tab-blog#ixzz1WXAzCsWj


« Last Edit: August 30, 2011, 10:29:51 AM by Oil Lady »

endurance

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #103 on: August 30, 2011, 10:26:58 AM »
Doug, some links I hadn't seen before.  Thanks.  I also saw this in the related links.  I couldn't believe it was a pre-2008 crash CNN report on peak oil preppers.  Only a 2:18 piece, but never the less, I think it's the kind of bit that starts to plant the seed.  No, they didn't do enough, but it's the type of reporting that starts a conversation.

Offline Doug

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #104 on: August 30, 2011, 10:37:08 AM »
The best way to get any Hollywood  producer to read this thread is to stick that producer's name directly into this thread so that his name shows up in any Google searches he might launch on his own name. And just how often do Hollywood producers do Google searches on their own name? Well, here's what Oscar Wilde once said: "There's only one thing worse than being talked about, and that's NOT being talked about."


Let's just see: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2011106/fullcredits
Livin' for the Apocalypse


Produced by
Jason A. Carbone   ....    executive producer
Angela LaManna   ....    associate producer
Nick Lee   ....    co-executive producer
Eric Rodriguez   ....    post producer
 
Production Management
Meredith Marshall   ....    executive in charge of production

Offline Oil Lady

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #105 on: August 30, 2011, 10:37:43 AM »
Doug, some links I hadn't seen before.  Thanks.  I also saw this in the related links.  I couldn't believe it was a pre-2008 crash CNN report on peak oil preppers.  Only a 2:18 piece, but never the less, I think it's the kind of bit that starts to plant the seed.  No, they didn't do enough, but it's the type of reporting that starts a conversation.

Half the battle of getting the conversation going is that a lot of people don't even know e vocabulary needed to have a meaningful discussion about it. 

What little vocabulary they do have tends toward the kind of sound bytes that paint preppers as looney-tunes. Terms like "doomsday shelter" and even the word "survival" can be real turn-offs, raising yellow flags and flashing red lights in people's minds, making them back away slowly with one eye on the nearest exit.

So I think terms like "disaster preparedness" are far less threatening to a lot of mainstream people when you want to explain why you have a bug-out-bag in your car. Even explaining that you took a course on "household emergency management" as opposed to a course in "wilderness survival" can be the difference between someone writing you off as totally nuts vs. wanting to hear more about what you have to say.





Offline marauder

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #106 on: August 30, 2011, 10:40:55 AM »
The *problem* though, as I see it--living in the heart of what should be considered normalcy bias HQ--is that when the chips are really down, the sheeple in this area have a reputation of stepping up. 

NYC blackout? No violence. No looting. no rioting in the streets. No starvation. People went about their business and were as kind as can be to each other.

9/11?  This area of the world--I am under 10 miles from NYC in Northern NJ--cooperated on levels I've never seen in my lifetime. The people of NYC evacuated calmly. They figured out how to get home. They pitched in. They volunteered. They did everything we would expect them NOT to do.

This past weekend? Sure, there were lines and the sheeple were out buying milk and bread, but by and large, people listened and prepared for a big weather event. Needless rescues have taken place, but at levels well below what we are used to in this area.

The only way you are going to attract large numbers of people into a preparedness lifestyle is to have them adversely affected by one of the events that we routinely talk about. The guy who lost his $50k finished basement this weekend is probably on the phone with a plumber and an electrician this morning discussing sump pumps, battery back-ups, generators and other preparedness contingency plans. The family who is stuck in their house in NYS and eating Corn Pops and luke warm water, is probably discussing putting some food back once this over. My neighbor, who didn't get water, didn't lose power and didn't have a tree hit house, is calling this the most overhyped weather event of his lifetime. No *conversation* about normalcy bias is going to reach him...

Offline Oil Lady

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #107 on: August 30, 2011, 10:48:17 AM »
Let's just see: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2011106/fullcredits
Livin' for the Apocalypse


Produced by
Jason A. Carbone   ....    executive producer
Angela LaManna   ....    associate producer
Nick Lee   ....    co-executive producer
Eric Rodriguez   ....    post producer
 
Production Management
Meredith Marshall   ....    executive in charge of production


That's a start, Doug. ;)

But what you REALLY want to do in order to get those dude to GO AHEAD AND CLICK into this message forum (and not merely do covert smart-link scans of the search results on their Bing page) is to TALK ABOUT THE PERSON! ;)

Such as ...

Meredith Marshall. I wonder if she's related to Penny Marshall or Gary Marshall? Penny and Gary are both exceptional delegators, able to handle production crews of 60 people or more, and even have a few unit directors answer to them all at the same time. So if Meredith Marshall is the executive in charge of production on this one video project, that is a really tough job that requires exceptional organization skill. I'd be willing to bet that Meredith Marshall has got the same blood flowing through her veins and has the same superior organizational skills in her genes.  Even if it turns out she isn't related to them, surely she didn't get that job without just plain having the skills needed for it. While it;s true that there are SOME jobs in Hollywood that get handed out to the wrong people for the wrong reasons, THAT job is not the kind you hand out to just anyone. That job is way too crucial and the wrong person in that job can sink the whole project. So Meredith Marshall is surely a person of exceptional talent.

*Oil Lady grabs a tissue and wipes her nose off*


Offline Oil Lady

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #108 on: August 30, 2011, 11:19:05 AM »
Okay, NOW is the part when I say something not so nice about one of the producers. Alan Madison had the following to say about Dennis McClung:

http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/episode/doomsday-preppers-6202/Overview#tab-blog#ixzz1WXI4MAzD

Quote
The McClung family is a microcosm of the show as a whole. They were a great family who lived in a suburb of Phoenix. They were typical by actuarial standards — two kids, a dog, a well-kept house… and then not so typical by any standard with 1,000 tilapia fish in the deep end of their swimming pool, eight chickens in their backyard, two pygmy goats, and a video version Mayan calendar on their flat-screen TV that counted down the seconds til the end of the world.

Dennis and Danielle McClung believe there will be a coronal mass ejection (CME), which means massive sunspots are going to come off the sun's surface and hit earth, in 2012. This would fry the world's electrical grid and send us back to the stone age.

To protect themselves from this impending disaster they had transformed their 500-square-foot backyard swimming pool into a green-to-the-extreme, completely energy efficient, self-sustaining food machine. It was pure genius, with chickens, tilapia and a variety of produce being organically raised in the limited space. What's wrong with this environmentally perfect picture?

The problem for me was that each time I asked Dennis why he did this, he replied matter-of-factly, "To prepare my family for a coronal mass ejection in 2012."

Oh.

I left the McClung's entirely impressed with their ingenuity and dedication, charmed by their children, wanting a pygmy goat for my apartment, but still extremely skeptical of their motivations.

The McClungs to me are indicative of both the positives and negatives of each of the four people we profiled. They were inventive, ingenious and dedicated — all traits I highly value. But ultimately, obsessed with preparing for the end of days.



After everything that I have read that the REAL Dennis McClung posted here in this thread, the only conclusion I can draw is that Alan Madison is at best a person who only sees what he wants to see, or at worst is a straight up liar. Alan Madison has grossly misrepresented Dennis McClung with utterly untrue bullshit. And either Alan Madison is bone-headed enough to believe this bullshit about the real Dennis McClung, or he diabolically doesn't believe it because he knows it's untrue but lacks the ethics to care that it's untrue. Either way, Alan Madison is full of bullshit as far as what he wrote here about Dennis McClung.

I have worked on video projects in the past, and I know the kind of bullshit that Dennis McClung was put through by this National Geographic production crew. He was TOLD by the producers to hype up the 2012 thing. INSTRUCTED by the producers to only speak on camera of 2012 and nothing else. COACHED by the producers to make it look like 2012 is his only focus, when the real truth is Dennis McClung has little concern about the whole Mayan calendar thing at all. 

And then Alan Madison has the frigging nerve to IMPLY that any mention of the whole Mayan 2012 thing came entirely from Dennis McClung, conveniently leaving out the FACT that it was the National Geographic crew who COACHED the McClung family into only giving answers that keep steering all maters back toward the Mayan 2012 thing.  Nowhere does Alan Madison come clean by either including the fact that the McClungs are preppers for other reasons that fall well outside of the 2012 Mayan calendar countdown, nor by admitting that the alleged answer McClung gave him "each time" he was asked was in fact an answer that Dennis McClung was coached by Alan MAdison's crew into giving. His treatment of Dennis McClung in this posting of his is utterly disingenuous, and I wish National Geographic would get a look at his lack of scruples and refuse to contract him in the future. 



 


Offline Doug

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #109 on: August 30, 2011, 11:59:12 AM »
What I noticed in the show about Survival Doc was that while they featured him planning for a financial collapse there was never any questioning him as to why he believed the the dollar would collapse.

I wished they'd feature someone like Chris Martenson in one of these shows.

endurance

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #110 on: August 30, 2011, 01:14:48 PM »
I wished they'd feature someone like Chris Martenson in one of these shows.
+1 
Add in Martenson, Kunstler, John Mauldin, Ret. Gen. Honore, Spirko... you could actually have a great panel discussion about the threats and solutions in a two hour episode referring folks to various forums and websites for additional information.

Offline JGreene

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #111 on: August 30, 2011, 05:50:53 PM »
The wife and I watched it last night on the DVR... typical crap.  Its a shame, there was some good stuff in there. 

We do many of the same things, for different reasons... thank you Jack!   LOL

Offline TheSurvivalMom

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #112 on: August 30, 2011, 08:55:32 PM »
I'm a little late to the party here but wanted to put in my own two cents.  Oil Lady, you are pretty spot on about how the filming of reality TV works.  In our own case, they edited out a really, really important part of the first sentence you hear me say, "I CAN UNDERSTAND HOW SOME PEOPLE MIGHT FEEL...we have no other purpose in life other than preparing for some Armageddon."  Yep, they cut off the first part of the sentence, leaving me sounding and looking like some deranged, obsessed woman.  Ridiculous, and the people who know me and read my blog immediately noticed something was wrong.

On my blog and in my writing I check and double-check my facts and give credit where it's due, so being purposely misquoted is something I'm not going to forgive.

I enjoy teaching preparedness and writing about it and am used to be being interviewed, but I wasn't fully aware of the difference between an interview, which generally tend to be factual, and reality TV. 

Offline TheSurvivalMom

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #113 on: August 30, 2011, 09:05:08 PM »


Rather than show all the trannie, white-trash bullsh**, I wish they'd have shown the _real_ struggles of a couple of preppers who actually have overcome some adversity.  No, their preps weren't perfect, but dammit. . .they were trying (not hard enough, IMHO, but trying, nonetheless). 

The Professor


Here's a little bit of background on that TLC show.  Like many others, they contacted me and sent me a long list of questions and a little video recorder.  Their instructions told me to make a big deal out of my preps, brag, and show it off.  Well, that's not me and I'm not into BS.

So, I answered their questions, showed a bit of my pantry, the solar oven, that sort of thing and sent it off.  I had just finished the NatGeo filming and did NOT want to do TV again, so I'd have to say my video was probably less than inspiring!   ;D

I referred them to a friend who is very creative, has a large medicinal herb garden, hubby is a doctor and they have done a lot of prepping.  Turns out, they weren't radical enough either.  Enter the transvestite.  I mean, really.  How hard do you have to look to find a transgendered prepper???  Sheesh.

Clearly, they do NOT want typical families in these shows unless they can edit them to make them look obsessive and unhinged.  My advice to anyone who is thinking about being a part of one of these shows is, be very aware that you have NO control over how your words, family, etc. will be portrayed.  If that's okay with you, then go for it.

Lisa
TheSurvivalMom.com


Offline Cedar

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #114 on: August 30, 2011, 09:34:11 PM »
Lisa.. are you the AZ mom on the Doomsday Prepper show then?

Cedar

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #115 on: August 30, 2011, 10:10:52 PM »
Glad to have you here, Lisa... thanks for sharing your experiences with us. If you get a chance, stop by the intro thread here: http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=89.0

Offline Doug

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #116 on: August 30, 2011, 10:14:49 PM »
Quote
Clearly, they do NOT want typical families in these shows unless they can edit them to make them look obsessive and unhinged.  My advice to anyone who is thinking about being a part of one of these shows is, be very aware that you have NO control over how your words, family, etc. will be portrayed.  If that's okay with you, then go for it.

If it were me I'd make them sign a contract stating I have not only final control over the editing of my content but a preview of the show before I let myself be put out there. Why? Because you could have someone like a Chris Martenson on one of these shows who being totally rational about his reasons and the producers put up a couple like the last two (the transvestite) which would link the rational interview to the crank. Guilt by association.

Offline TheSurvivalMom

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #117 on: August 30, 2011, 10:39:04 PM »
Doug, you're exactly right.  Marginalize the messenger and you do the same to their message. 

Cedar, yes, that's me. 

Offline Doug

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #118 on: August 30, 2011, 11:02:09 PM »
TheSurvivalMom, if you would go back up the tread for the past two days and read what I posted on peak oil. I suspect you'll be asked to be on another one of these shows. If you agree with me and others posting here about peak oil then tell the producers that if they believe you are a crank for prepping then they must also believe that the US Pentagon's Brass is also full of cranks.

Hell, even James Schlesinger is a peak oil prepper himself.
 http://www.businessinsider.com/james-schlesinger-peak-oil-2010-11
He was on a show where he has put solar panels on his home



Do You See the Ghost of Christmas Future? Dr. Kathy McMahon on "Peak Oil Blues"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NY-1eGaACE0&feature=related

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Re: Doomsday Prepper TV show (merged topics)
« Reply #119 on: August 31, 2011, 09:27:11 AM »
Clearly, they do NOT want typical families in these shows unless they can edit them to make them look obsessive and unhinged. 

Absolutely. The secret to good writing and good cinema is TONE!! Getting the correct tone in either a novel or in a video production is almost the same general idea as when an athlete says "it's all in the wrist." Part of crafting tone is getting your subjects to say the right words in the right way. And if you can't get them to do it, the you get them to engage in a physical activity on camera where you can make them look a certain way.

My advice to anyone approached by a reality TV producer.

1) Get a look at their past productions of reality TV. See if they made their subjects look a certain way. Try and get a sense as to whether their treatment was fair.

2) Contact past subjects. Ask them: "Do you feel you were treated fairly? Did they misrepresent you with slick editing and other tricks?"

3) Don't engage in too much physical activity on camera --don't dance! If you dance, they will make you look like a complete buffoon. One thing they do is focus on your jiggling flab as you dance, sometimes even employing slow motion on your jiggling flab. Another thing they do is edit the sound later on to have your dancing set to comical music of the sort meant to satirize you.

4) If you have a huge bookshelf full of books, merely gesture to the book shelf and allow them to video the shelves of books. Do NOT take the books down from the shelves. Do NOT pile them up on a table for them like a Jenga tower. The books are fine as they are on the shelves.   

5) DO NOT!! ABSOLUTELY DO NOT allow them to put words into your mouth. Such as, I have a friend who was interviewed for UFO phenomenon. They sat him down to do a standard talking-head interview (that's when you merely sit there before the camera, and only your head and shoulders are showing in the frame, and you just talk to the camera, or else talk to the off-camera interviewer --it's called "talking-head" because if you were to turn off the sound, all you would see is a human head endlessly talking).  The producer explained to my friend that whenever he asked my friend a question he needed my friend to repeat the exact same question right back to him again before giving the answer. So my friend foolishly complied. One of the questions was something like "Is it possible that aliens are living in our midst right now?" So that became one of the sound bytes attributed to my friend in the production. He was furious. So if they ever ask you to recite words that are not your own, or repeat words that are not your own --DON'T!

6) Don't put on clothes they ask you to put on, or wear some of your own clothes of the sort you wouldn't normally wear. This is especially true if they learn that maybe you have an old Halloween costume in your closet. They might ask you to put it on, but for the love of God DON'T dress up like a weirdo for them! Keep all of your clothing choices 100% under your control!  I have only one exception to this rule. This exception of mine concerns the interviews conducted during a History Channel special produced a few years ago about the war between Greece and Persia. There was a pretty cool Hollywood film that came out about 4 or 5 years ago called 300, based upon the true story of the Battle of Thermopylae between the 300 Greeks from Sparta, and the entire army of the Persian Empire under Xerxes. One of the very cool things they did with that movie was an unusual choice in the film's art direction to control the color filters of the entire film so that the whole movie was in sepia, accented by deep black, and then the very selective use of red was allowed only for the cloaks of the Spartans.  Nothing else was red -- Even the spurting blood during the battle scenes was just sepia and black. And yet the red cloaks worn by the Spartan soldiers remained red. This was seen as a brilliant choice in cinema-craft, and I agree because as far as I'm concerned it just plain worked. It wasn't gimmicky or distracting at all. It instead gave the film a very unique feel, and I totally dug it. The visual poetry in this movie's use of color and slow-motion was breath taking.

Here are clips from the movie. WARNING! It's rated R for good reason! Lots of violence!
The trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ng_7SHhynlk
A cool speech made by Leonidis: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gI6sARmxEuc
Awesome fight scene: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8bIEk58LzI

Meanwhile, the advertising/PR execs for that Hollywood film struck a deal with History Channel a solid 6 months before the film opened, and had the History Channel produce a 2-hour documentary special about the actual historical facts surrounding that famous battle. The whole point behind this History Channel deal (and this is actually SOP nowaday for Hollywood's huge tent pole films) was they wanted the 2-hour special to be broadcast during the final 2 weeks prior to when the movie 300 itself opened nationwide in theatres.  I video-taped that one History Channel special, and I found it to be a bang-up piece of history, and I also found it to be an excellent specimen of video interviewing.

Here's a clip from that History Channel special.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sj810hUDVUQ

Pay attention to the clothing being worn by every last one of the historians being interviews. ALL of the historians were given special clothes to wear just for the interviews. Everyone is wearing black-on-black with no exceptions. And the backgrounds behind them all are uniformly blood red.  The desire was to keep the color palate of the entire 2-hour special in keeping with the color palate of the film itself -- sepia toned, accented by extra-true black, and then only the color red being allowed to shine through. And so, this right here is the one and only exception I will make as far as the rule of "Don't wear clothes you wouldn't normally wear." The artistic choices as far as color and wardrobe made by the producers of this History Channel documentary special were just brilliant. But be VERY CAREFUL if an interviewer ever asks you to wear anything unusual.

7) Wear a suit if possible! An interview almost always requires a suit. If they tell you NOT to wear a suit, ask why. If they can't give you a good reason, wear your suit, but bring a back-up change of clothes just in case you get there and realize maybe a suit isn't a good idea. I saw a daytime talk show about 10 years ago (it might have been Rikki Lake) where they pitted two "experts" one against the other. Both of them were on stage side by side in two different chairs, each giving their positions. The one guy showed up in a suit. The other guy showed up in an Aloha shirt and khakis. Guess which guy the audience took more seriously?  And I'd be willing to bet dollars to donuts that the producers tricked the guy in the Aloha shirt by perhaps telling him the day before the show: "Don't wear a suit! You don't want the audience to be put off by you being all stuffy! Wear casual clothes. They'll be able to relate to you better that way." Yeah. Right. I'm sorry, but an in-studio interview ALWAYS demands a suit. Always. However, an interview out in the field (like a farmer being interviewed on his farm out in the barnyard) the interviewer usually shows up in jeans so he can walk around the barnyard with the farmer. So dress the same way he's dressing. But if he shows up wearing a suit and only wants to do a sit-down interview in the farmer's living room and not bother with the barnyard, then the farmer should say "Excuse me, I need to change" and then put on his suit. If they protest, too bad! They can wait 5 minutes while you change your clothes. If they insist that you not change, there's the door, good-bye. Meanwhile, at the other end of the spectrum of clothing, I saw another History Channel special where they interviewed a bunch of truck drivers about their jobs as drivers. One was a female truck driver, and she chose to wear a ladies' business suit with a skirt and heels for the interview. But it was NOT an in-studio interview, it was an interview conducted mostly in her truck as she was driving it, and then they continued to do more video with her at the various truck stops they stopped at along the road. She looked kind of silly wearing a suit while driving her 18-wheeler. While I admire her initiative to look her best and wear a suit, I think she really should have taken the extra step to have her best casual clothes on hand to change into so that she could drive in her normal clothes.   




THE BEST RULE OF THUMB TO GO WITH HERE--

If the interviewer seems genuinely interested in LEARNING from you, then you can probably trust them.

BUT --

If the interviewer has little interest in your knowledge, and is merely superficially polite and is obviously not REALLY interested as you disseminate your pearls of wisdom to him, be careful! And then if he consistently want to script things out, get you to say things that don't at all jive with the reality of your area of expertise, and if his pre-scripted nonsense is more a product of his own mistaken preconceptions about you and about your profession, then keep your guard up. You need to especially pay attention to when concerns arise about "losing the daylight" because he had his poor little heart set upon getting a few shots outside in the daylight (before the sun sets!) of you doing this or doing that or doing whatever. If there ever arises any worries about "losing he daylight" it means he has something scripted out in his head that he wants you to do on camera, and he has his heart set on it --DEAD SET on it. So that right there is a danger-will-robinson cue for you. He's less interested in learning the truth from you and more interested in fleshing out the tone of a script he has somewhere.

As a writer myself, I absolutely DETEST reality television. The initial rise of reality TV happened during one of the WGA writer's strikes back in the late 1980's. During that strike, there were no writers available to write, so the networks were desperate to fill the airwaves with SOMETHING. And since reality TV is generally not scripted (needs no guild-member writers), and is super duper cheap and quick to produce, it was a natural Plan B for them to resort to during the strike. Reality TV came and went in fashion over the next 10 years with a lot of shows resulting in complete flops due to lack of interest. Few reality shows prospered because they just about never managed to hit the right formula. But the appeal among network executives to try and find the perfect formula for a successful reality show was driven by how insanely inexpensive reality TV is to produce. (Quick camera work, lower quality cameras, quick editing, NO guild writer salaries, NO guild actor salaries, NO residuals.) And then, with the success of COPS followed by the success of Survivor, we witnessed the dawn of the first truly successful waves of reality TV. Lots of tinkering and lots of mistakes continued to get made on trying to make a show with lasting appeal. And then the right formulas were finally arrived at: make the show a sort of a contest between multiple contestants, serialize the show so that the audience has to keep coming back for more every week, allow the audience to participate each week via some sort of voting mechanism, come up with any excuse possible for contestants to be dressed in skimpy skin-bearing little nothings for clothes, and any time two or more contestants get into a squabble, record that squabble and milk it for all the drama you can --in fact, when you are choosing the show contestants during pre-production choose the ones who will look good in a bikini and who are likely to squabble a lot. And in the end, it's STILL loads cheaper (by many degrees) to produce reality TV than regular scripted fiction TV.  So reality TV is now a permanent feature of the American TV landscape. And I hate it! It's supposedly not scripted, but sadly it IS scripted. And the 22-year-old kids who write the scripts are NOT paid guild-minimum, and get paid mere pennies, work very long hard hours as writers AND as camera operators AND as editors, and they don't get paid jack-shit for their hard work. The networks are raking in hundreds of millions of dollars on these shows and not one "writer" gets paid a dime for any of it. IT PUTS WRITERS OUT OF WORK! (And puts actors out of work too.)  It's also mostly just intellectually barren fluff and nonsense, the main appeal being shallow drama and and mentally unstable fits of histrionics. Meanwhile, we're raising up an entire generation of young people who watch this outlandish behavior and assume that THIS is the proper way to conduct oneself.  Young people today watch reality TV and somehow think the best way to behave is to be a spoiled little drama queen. I wish reality TV would just go away. But it's here to stay. It's all just manipulative falsehoods, packaged as real life. The "vast wasteland" of TV just got a whole lot vaster.


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