Author Topic: So convince me...  (Read 9849 times)

Offline MilSpecIA

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So convince me...
« on: June 29, 2011, 05:25:42 PM »
I'm thinking about getting into reloading, specifically .45 and .308 Win, but am still not convinced into it's advantages as far as cost, accuracy, and equipment. So I figure the folks here would be the best place to ask; aside from the satisifaction of a personal hobby, what are the advantages to investing $1k in tools plus materials necessary for reloading given today's economy and political posture on ammo/guns? Especially given resources such as BulkAmmo.com that provides completed ammo. Thoughts? Comments?

Offline Heavy G

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2011, 08:26:53 PM »
I've wondered the same thing so I'll be interested in the answers too.

One thing that I can't currently justify for reloading is the time.  I would love to take the time to reload but I don't have it.  You can't "multitask" while you're measuring powder.  I worry that even if I had the time to reload when I started that I would get busy at work and not have any time for a few months.

Offline d0j0w0

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2011, 08:44:48 PM »
I've been kicking around the same ideas for a few years now.  I'll give you the same advice an old timer gave me.  First, buy a reloading book/manual and read through it.  This will give you a good starting point.  He also told me not, to buy the cheap starter kits.  If you like reloading you will want the better equipment, and the cheaper kits do not have a good resale value.  He was not specific to a certain brand.  He also said to set a budget equal to the price of a good quality handgun ($600-$700).  I have not jumped the gun yet, so to speak.  Like you ammo seems cheap enough right now.  This can change over night, as we have seen over the past several years.  I'm certain that reloading would be a great skill to know in a SHTF.  I'm considering the Dillon BL 550 which starts at about $300 buck and would leave me $300 bucks for tools and supplies.  But,  I'm considering buying a used setup which might save me a $150 bucks.  But, I'm going to start with the book for $30 bucks.

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2011, 08:50:40 PM »
I used to reload back in the day when I made about $12/hour at work and shot about 150 rounds a week.  It made a lot of sense then (1990-ish).  I had a single stage Rock Chucker, the cheapest press you could buy at the time ($75) and dies for 9mm, .308, .223, .38.  Most of my reloading was 9mm and at the time, ammo was $8.95/50 (damn expensive relative to all things today).

In the late 90s my storage locker got busted into while I was between places and lost my reloading stuff.  Now, making what I do and prices of ammo being cheaper relative to inflation, I can't rationalize it except if...

First off, I keep a Lee Loader for .308 and .270 along with the makings (primers, powder and bullets) for about 700 rounds.  The Lee Loader uses a plastic mallet instead of a press (it's not as crazy as it sounds) and the dies are about $25 each from Cabelas.  Now, before you get too excited, it only does neck resizing, so it's for your bolt action guns, not semi-autos.  Also, you can reload about 20-30 rounds an hour with some practice.  Time efficiency wise, it's horrendous, but it lets you load custom loads cheaply (like a .308 squirrel round) and if TSHTF, I have more high quality ammo than I could afford to store.

Second, if you actually want to produce mass amounts of ammo, go with a progressive press.  Dillon seems to be the king and has the best warranty in the business.  A friend of mine has a handgun only press and does about 500-600 rounds per hour.  That's fast!  The press runs somewhere around $300, the dies are about $60/caliber with die plate.  That's going to take some time to pay off, but saves you a lot of time.

As for how much you'll save, how great it all is, and all that... I'll leave that to guys that do a lot of it.  Some guys seem to enjoy it like others enjoy gardening.  It's not a chore, it's a form of moving meditation.

Offline Bradbn4

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2011, 09:55:53 PM »
Don't go cheap - but - you don't have to crank out 500+ rounds an hour either to get the benefit of reloading.

I don't consider a single stage Rock Chucker to be cheap - and  you won't just going to outgrow it in a few years.   To get maximum performance out of reloading endurance has provided some some good info.  Single stage can produce a bit more consistent loads.  A single stage setup should be able to keep up with normal use of standard hunting rounds with out too much "fuss".

Most folks say you don't save money - you just end up shooting more. 

For folks that shoot a lot, reload a lot of different caliber ammo - they often will have a reloading setup for each type of ammo.   So if they have 9mm, 40s&w, 10mm and 45 acp they would have 3 setups.... Note:  40S&W and 10mm use basically the same hardware with minor tweakages. 

There is a full range of hardware out there from the cheap stuff that might take you 10 mins to reload one shot - to ones that can almost kick out 600+ rounds an hour. Reloading 45 acp can be done "cheaply" at the expense of flexibility... a setup could run you between 200 - 500 dollars.   Because 45 acp shoots heavy and slow rounds it is more than possible to even get into casting your own bullets.

Before I would start reloading I would get 1 - 2 good books that cover the basics.  Now a days you can find something on you_tube to provide a gut check on almost any hardware you can think of. 

Only one hard core recommendation - find hardware that uses standard dies.  This way if you change hardware your bases are covered.


Offline MilSpecIA

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2011, 07:06:31 AM »
For me it's not so much an issue of time, or need to crank out +100's of rounds in an hour. I have one set of hands, only four calibers for my entire armory, and am pretty much willing to dedicate from 30 minutes to an all day in reloading. But my main concern is that for 1k+ in a Dillon Precision setup, what is the cost offset from buying the materials as opposed to just saving that amount and buying in bulk? I did a cost analysis of 1000 rounds and it came out to about $0.53 per round (fully assembled - between the bullet, brass, primer, and powder "purchased" from Midway USA) for reload and $0.57 per round if bought in bulk of 1000 from BulkAmmo.com. I imagine for the larger rifle calibers it might be more of an offset, but not much. So if in 1000 rounds my cost savings is just $0.04 per round that makes my total dollar saved $40 which will be largely consumed in shipping and handling, either in consumables for reloading or in overall bulk purchases. Hence my skepticism.

My local range is holding an NRA class that I am going to attend to be certified in reloading, but still the cost analysis is why I am hesitant. Everyone says your costs should be half as much, and folks in turn shoot twice as much. But like Heavy G, I only have so much time as opposed to my job so my main concern is costs.

Also some folks say reloading done by yourself is inherently more accurate than the stuff mass produced by larger manufacturers. True or false?

Offline NotoriousAPP

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2011, 08:33:15 AM »
I load for .380, .45 colt, 30-06 and .223.  I got into reloading because I couldn't find .380 ammo and many times .45 colt ammo for my handguns during the past ammo shortages.  The .45 colt was also very expensive ($30 for 50 rds) for even basic lead nosed bullets...hunting rounds cost much more.  Additionally, I have a couple M1 Garands and you have to be cautious with the ammo you put through them, too hot a load and you can damage the gun, reloading 30-06 took the guesswork out of buying commercial ammunition and is also much cheaper, especially for hunting loads.

To give you an idea of how much I shoot, I go to the range maybe 1-2 times/month and take at least one handgun firearms course during the year.  I don't need a high volume of ammo so I purchased a RCBS Rock Chucker (single stage) and have found it to be perfect for my needs.  There is a lot of other small peripheral equipment that goes along with this so you will probably spend more than you thought you would; my setup cost me ~$400 so far.  I don't always start and finish a load on the same day, I may start working on a load (inspect brass, deprime brass, tumble brass, trim brass) in one day and two weeks later finish the load (resize brass, charge with powder, press bullet) so don't feel like you need to do everything in one day.  You just have to make sure you keep a good notebook; do not be lazy with the notes.

I've found reloading to be very rewarding, has provided me with a steady supply of ammo when I can't buy it, has saved me a little bit of money and I also spend more time on making a quality shot since I need to consider the time invested in each round (analogous to using cash vs the credit card to make purchases....it's not just fire and forget).

Offline hillclimber

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2011, 02:37:14 PM »
I've been handloading for many years. I think I'm up to 18 calibers at this point.
You asked for opinions, so here's mine 8)
First, handloading isn't for everyone. I really like it, and I feel I'm pretty good at it. Some folks are good at it and just don't like it. Others just don't have the attention to detail to do it very well.
To start with, don't go out and buy that big-money reloading equipment right away. A Dillon is a nice press and I'm not knocking them at all, but you really should start with a single stage in my opinion. Older equipment is pretty inexpensive. I think I have 3 presses right now, one Lyman progressive, a Rockchucker II, and an old Lyman single stage. Of those I use the progressive the least, but when I do use it, I use it a lot. I tend to use it more for when I have hundreds of rounds of handgun ammo to reload. If I have just a few boxes of rifle ammo to load I use one of the single stages, mostly the Lyman.
I just wouldn't dump a bunch of cash into it before you figure out if it's a hobby you want to invest in.
So, that being said, if it were me, I'd buy a good used single stage press. Most all of them have the same size threads and will use the same dies you'll use later on anyway.
You'll want a good set of scales too. There's alot of little stuff like a lube pad,case trimmer, de-burring tool, calipers, powder trickler,etc.. that stuff will add up, but you'll need it no matter what press you get. Dies can add up too. A good 3die set of carbides for 45acp will be around fifty bucks, but they'll last forever.
I'd buy a few handloading books too. The ones I use most are the Speer and Lyman books. I grab all the used reloading books I can find. ;)

I've spent hundreds of hours handloading and the benefits can be great. But as a "post-shtf skill", I dunno...
You'd have to stock up on a poop-load of powders, primers, and projectiles. I just keep my brass filled up, and shoot when I feel like it. I guess I see it as a fun hobby that keeps the price of shooting down, and keeps the ammo cans filled.
Hope this helps...

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2011, 03:01:02 PM »
I've spent hundreds of hours handloading and the benefits can be great. But as a "post-shtf skill", I dunno...
You'd have to stock up on a poop-load of powders, primers, and projectiles. I just keep my brass filled up, and shoot when I feel like it. I guess I see it as a fun hobby that keeps the price of shooting down, and keeps the ammo cans filled.
Hope this helps...
I think this says it all.  It's kinda like its own hobby. 

Offline MilSpecIA

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2011, 03:03:24 PM »
Quote
I've spent hundreds of hours handloading and the benefits can be great. But as a "post-shtf skill", I dunno...
You'd have to stock up on a poop-load of powders, primers, and projectiles. I just keep my brass filled up, and shoot when I feel like it. I guess I see it as a fun hobby that keeps the price of shooting down, and keeps the ammo cans filled.
Hope this helps...

Actually hillclimber those comments, and the previous ones before, are just the feedback I am looking for. Basically what I want to know is if this hobby is worth the cost and has benefits to keep the cost of my own shooting down. Post-SHTF I'm not seeing reloading mattering much, since we'd be talking about an interruption in the production of primers - without which reloading is useless. But as a hobby that has tangable benifits in keeping costs for shooting down and helps keep a personal stockpile I'll be all for it.  ;D What's the actual savings per round when you reload vs purchasing in bulk from a retailer (my math may have been off or was for only a specific caliber)?

Offline d0j0w0

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #10 on: June 30, 2011, 04:21:06 PM »
The latest Guns and Ammo magazine, August 2011, has a article on progressive reloaders.  How timely.  This post has given me a lot more to chew on.

Offline Pathfinder

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #11 on: June 30, 2011, 05:40:25 PM »
I've wondered the same thing so I'll be interested in the answers too.

One thing that I can't currently justify for reloading is the time.  I would love to take the time to reload but I don't have it.  You can't "multitask" while you're measuring powder RELOADING!  I worry that even if I had the time to reload when I started that I would get busy at work and not have any time for a few months.

FIFY.  ;D

Reloading costs have increased markedly over the past few years, same reasons for the jump in ammo - component prices, metals, etc. We just de-leaded our pistol range, and made enough on the scrap lead to pay for this year's de-leading, next year's de-leading, with enough left over to buy some more shredded tires for the backstop.

We cannot give our 9mm brass away, have started taking it to the recycler as well. Why? Prices of new 9mm ammo have dropped so far that reloading is not cost justifiable unless you are reloading a very specific bullet and powder mix.

Brass for .45ACP, .45Colt, .380 and a few others disappears as soon as we get it on the shelf. These it makes sense to reload as you will save, and in the case of .45Colt, it is cheaper than buying new.

Even if you are reloading an unusual round, like the 6.8 Rem SPC, component prices - if you can find the components, especially the brass - is so expensive you're not saving much over the $1-$1.50 per round off the shelf new. The cost of reloading equipment has jumped too - just like food and everything else. I paid $300 for a used Dillon 550B used with 2 die sets and a low powder sensor. New at the time, that would have been roughly $400. Now, the 550B alone is almost $500.

OT one H, it makes reloading tough to get into. OT other H, the prices will only go up from here - assuming the machines remain legal to own.

Offline RacinRob

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #12 on: June 30, 2011, 06:26:05 PM »
I cheepped out on my setup.  I have a lee challenger setup. Under 100 bucks and it works for me.  I load mostly in the winter for something to do, I don't need to crank out a ton of rounds maybe 3000 or 4000 per year. I am more or less happy with it. I really don't like the bushings for the dies and the powder measure sucks with certain powders.  But it is all I really need. Best of all I think that it paid for itself in the first 1000 .45 shells I made.  I also only load 9mm, .45, .223, and .308. I am not a fan of lee dies though, for dies I like rcbs.

« Last Edit: June 30, 2011, 06:32:02 PM by RacinRob »

Offline RacinRob

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #13 on: June 30, 2011, 07:19:25 PM »
Ok here is a price break down. (all savings assume that you need to buy brass and the vs price are the cheapest brass case ammo I could find on www.bulkammo.com)
.45 ACP
16.99 - 1 pound bullseye
29.99 - 1000 primers cci large pistol
125 - jacketed FMJ bullets (my handguns don't like plated) http://www.rozedist.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=RZD&Category_Code=ZBJ-45ACP
Comes to 167.12 per 1000
add 82 (http://www.oncefiredbrass.net/45acp.html) if you need to buy once fired brass for a total of 249.12
Vs.
335 + 25 for shipping

This is without tax because I don't know what your taxes are.  I only mailorder the bullets because the hazmat fee kills me on the primers and powder. Also I have found it very hard to wreck my .45 base I figure I am up to 12 loadings on some of it, so 1000 pieces will last a long time if you don't lose it.

Savings 110.88

9mm
16.99 - 1 pound bullseye
29.99 - 1000 primers cci large pistol
101.40 - 1000 115 grn fmj (same site)

143.52 per 1000 add 44 for once fired brass total 187.52.  I have never had to buy 9mm.  I find a ton at the range.

vs

217.36

saving 73.84

.223
24.99 - 1 pound varget
29.99 - 1000 cci primer
45.99 - 500 hornady fmj 55 grn

211.20 per 1000 + 71 if you need to buy brass 282.20

vs

310 + 21 = 331

saving 48.80
It is getting harder to make reloading .223 worth while.  If you are cool with shooting steel case ammo, it is cheaper than reloading.

.308
24.99 - 1 pound varget
29.99 - 1000 cci primer
22.99 - 100 hornady spfb

410 per 1000 plus 150 if you need brass.

vs
950 + 25 = 975

saving 415

I used the remington core loct at $19 a box, the .308 I load is hunting ammo so I used hunting ammo to compare price.

Offline d0j0w0

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #14 on: June 30, 2011, 07:53:52 PM »
Thanks for breaking it down RacinRob.

Offline velojym

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #15 on: June 30, 2011, 08:59:42 PM »
You can start out on a smaller scale without having to sacrifice anything when you decide to upgrade. The Lee Loader or hand press is a handy tool to take with you to the range when working up loads in the field, so you can keep it even after you've gotten the gee-whiz high end hardware.
Some calibers, as mentioned above, are more expensive than others not so much in line with their components, so my .44 magnum would be a heck of a lot more economical to reload than something like
9mm. Rifle calibers like .30-30 and the other more common ones are easy to stock up on, but if you're running something a bit more expensive off the shelf, they don't cost much more to reload than their peers... a FAR narrower gap than the retail price differences.
Economy of scale, and all that.

...and sometimes it's just therapeutic, crafting loaded cartridges one at a time. Heck, while I like to shoot, I'd still reload 'em faster than I shoot 'em. (gotta fix that, too)

Offline SuperDuty

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #16 on: July 01, 2011, 07:25:22 AM »
It's a combination of several things for me.  Accuracy, cost, and the hobby aspect as well as the ability to maintain a supply of ammo.  I tend to be thrifty (cheapskate) and I'm  interested in accuracy more than volume production, so I'm drawn to reloading.  I don't need to crank out 1k rounds of ammo in an hour or two.  If it takes a couple of sessions in the evenings or on the weekend, I'm OK with that.  Now, if you set the bar at $1k for a load of Dillon equipment then the ROI tends to stretch way out.  I've got a Lee turret press ($20 garage sale score in about 1985) and a Lyman cast iron single stage press that were inexpensive and have lasted for over 20 years. 

My focus is on acquiring components.  Just as we store food to be able to adapt in the future, so I think it is with reloading components.  To me the are ingredients for future "meals".  I can spend $30 an have 1K primers for any small pistol load I choose in the future, or I can be locked into about 3 boxes of 9mm FMJ at Wal-Mart prices.  I'll take the primers and maybe use some for some light 38 special loads to get my daughter's-in-law into shooting.  Some more might go into some hot 9mm loads, and some others might end up in the 45ACP cases I see now that take small primers.  For me it's a strategy, I guess.  Less on equipment and more on the components I need to assemble the ammo for the job at hand.  I don't have to decide what ammo I want until I begin to assemble it, and once I've assembled it, I know how it's going to perform in my weapon.

Good luck on your decision.

Offline hillclimber

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #17 on: July 01, 2011, 11:05:11 AM »
There is some tricks to keeping your costs down too, to many to go into really.
But really, handloading is no substitute for storing ammo in general. It will however boost the $hit out of the amount of ammo you store ;)
You will see a difference in commercial ammo in a whole new light. Example; My M1a does great with match grade ammo, but it would cost me a fortune to shoot it very often. With my handloaded match ammo it's much cheaper. ;D

It's a great hobby, and a good skill.

Offline phils70

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #18 on: July 12, 2011, 08:38:45 PM »
Reason for bolt gun reloading for me is accuracy.  Factory loads can't compete with a round crafted precisely for each rifle's chamber.  I don't have a huge box of 30-06.  I have several boxes for each rifle.  It is up to you to decide if factory loads are accurate enough for your application.  I have two Model 1917s in 06, they'd both be mediocre accuracy wise if I didn't reload.  The Rem Model 700 in .270 is bone stock. With reloads its a 1moa rifle.  No need for that Hill Country Rifles Harvester (dang it).

I save money on my handgun reloading by casting my own bullets.  My 45ACP target loads are less than a quarter a shot, I don't carry reloads while carrying concealed but the reloads print the same as the golden sabers.  The cast bullets in the 44 and 41Mags are accurate plinkers and kill hogs and deer dead enough.

As far as equipment goes, LEE makes a $30 press that I use as much as the more expensive tools around here. 

I couldn't afford to do much target practice without reloading.

Offline joeinwv

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #19 on: July 14, 2011, 10:19:52 PM »
Get a single stage press and some dies and learn how to reload. You can be loading 1 caliber cheap. If you like it, you will always have a use for the single stage.

I shoot a lot of 308 and 44 mag - without reloading, I would shoot a lot of 22LR.

Offline hillclimber

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #20 on: July 15, 2011, 12:36:00 PM »
I would add by the way, that Rob's cost breakdown is pretty accurate IMHO.
If you do the math, you'll notice that some calibers are cheaper to buy in bulk as oppsed to reloading.
For example, I can buy Russian 223 or 7.62x39 as cheap as I can load it myself, but as much 223 as I shoot, I still reload it alot. For about the same money, plus my time (whatever that's worth) I get to shoot better ammo.

When the big "ammo shortage" hit, and everybody was in a tail-spin because you couldn't buy 380acp fmj anywhere...Well, I had plenty, and plenty of bullets, powder and small pistol primers. I never really thought 380 would be a caliber that would be cost effective to handload, but I was wrong.

It is what you make it, and if yo like it, it gets addictive.

At this point I'm loading...
.223Rem
.243Win
.308Win
30-06
30-30
375H+H
300Win-Mag
300WSM
7mmRem Mag
44Mag- 44spcl
357mag-38spcl
45acp
9mm
380acp
7.62x39
375Win
30carbine
45-70

Offline PAGUY

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #21 on: July 15, 2011, 04:26:29 PM »
As many have pointed out already you can start with the basics with a few hundred dollars to include start up supplies.  After that initial cost the big start up cost will not need to be duplicated unless you start reloading a new caliber or wish to upgrade then the cost will be minimal in comparison.  The ability to reuse the brass multiple times before having to replace it will also provide savings. 
From my experience with reloading for sixteen years there are ups and downs on the thrift of reloading smaller calibers suck as 9mm, 38, 40 etc due to the readily available sources of decent quality commercial ammo.  This will allow you to shoot on the cheap in smaller calibers while the sources are available but if the sources dry up for what ever reason you will have no choice except to reload yourself.  Larger calibers are without a doubt offer more thrift when handloaded.  Any manner in which you view it handloading is a great skill to learn and become skilled at prior to the need if it should appear. 

Offline 375 RUM

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #22 on: July 31, 2011, 01:46:05 PM »
the point is do you fix your own car or get it fixed, it is up to you and your ability, reloading can get you in trouble fast. try out a double charge in a 45 acp and see how you get a different look on life, i did. i reload alot and the 375 rum is 70.00 a box of 20 to buy! cost is my main factor

Offline Bradbn4

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #23 on: August 02, 2011, 06:18:09 PM »
the point is do you fix your own car or get it fixed, it is up to you and your ability, reloading can get you in trouble fast. try out a double charge in a 45 acp and see how you get a different look on life, i did. i reload alot and the 375 rum is 70.00 a box of 20 to buy! cost is my main factor

One method of selecting powder is to make sure that at least 50% of the case is filled up.  That way if you double charge the round it spills out and you can not set the bullet.

However; my powder of choice for the 45 running light loads has been Bullseye. Which break's that rule all to heck.  However, I use it for putting holes in paper and for me works wonderful behind magnum primers.


And yes, I have double charged one and only one round - got my attention - and the dozen or so folks watching me shoot competition event.

Offline hd45hunt

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #24 on: August 02, 2011, 07:08:38 PM »
It's another one of those "things" that are cool to do if you are into it.  By that I relate it to homebrewing.  After a year of homebrewing, I can make some great beers, but I can't make a "coors light, bud or miller" cheaper than they can put it on the shelf.  But, I don't strive to duplicate them either.  When I started reloading, I began with a Dillon 550b because my caliber of choice was 45acp, and they are generally not a single shot firearm.  ;) I had a buddy with a Dillon and after watching him pump out pistol cartridges, knew I wanted one.  I added a lee (pic of my set up is in the "show us your reloading bench" post) turret press for "slow loading" calibers where I want to be really picky with charge weights, etc.  If it helps, I watched a series of videos on youtube by iraqveteran8888 which detailed alot of what goes into the craft.   This is the first one http://www.youtube.com/user/Iraqveteran8888#p/u/264/pM829M7ODEc  That said, its not for everyone and is more of a passion/hobby, not something one would do specifically to save money, kinda like homebrewing.  ;D   The last thing I would do is dump 1k into it to try it.  Do you know anyone who reloads who you could go watch and "help out"?  Would give you an idea of what its about.  Just my $.02

Offline tween

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #25 on: August 04, 2011, 04:15:40 PM »
get yourreloading gear for $50 on ebay, especially if you are going with the slow old single station press, powder measure, etc.  You can easily have $200 in such a set up, if you pay retail, and you can't get $50 for it if you want to sell it all,  and can't load more than 150 rds an hour on it. Once you understand the basics, go to ebay and get a used lee master loadall progressive, for $200 which will load  1000 rds per hour, if you get the bullet feeder, etc.  you can always go more slowly if you wish, but you can't go faster with the single station type presses!  :-) The progressive loaders have a powder measure built into them, so all you need is a powder scale, to "set" the powder measure to "throw" hte correct charge of powder for any give load.   

If you buy powder and primers in bulk, you can reload for a dime a shot in , 9mm, 14c each in .45. The brass casing  lasts for 10 reloadings or a bit more, so it is a one time purchase sort of thing, you can't base the price of reloads on having to buy the cases every time.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2011, 06:35:47 PM by tween »

Offline r1kk1

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Re: So convince me...
« Reply #26 on: August 15, 2011, 02:56:47 PM »
The best answer for your .308 is this. Take your best factory ammo and weapon and enter it into NRA hunter benchrest. If the weapon qualifies to run, I already know the answer.

I don't care about the cost of reloading. I handload. My ammo is specific to my firearm, it may or may not fire in yours. I have NEVER bought factory ammo! I have been given ammo to test. Factory ammo has come a long way. Someone asked me how much money I have in my gear. I have been handloading for 40 years. I have collected a lot of equipment over time. Thousands I guess. I have thousands spent on tools to build MY house. I don't even consider the price of tools.

Take your .45 and enter it into a Bullseye shoot. I know the answer to this already.

Handloading is a hobby and part of my life as a hunter, competitor, etc. I remember when firearms where sold with a loading tool, bullet mould, etc. I load everything except for rimfires.

I cannot afford Speedy Gonzales to load my 6 ppc benchrest rifle. I can't afford someone to build my custom house with upgraded wood and dovetailed drawers. I do it myself. It makes me independent.

I have firearms that there is NO ammo being made for it. 32 Long Colt for instance. Same as the .32 RimFire case but reloadable.

When the SHTF, skill sets are going to be priceless.

r1kk1