Author Topic: Anyone buy a seed vault?  (Read 4369 times)

Offline Robinelli

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Anyone buy a seed vault?
« on: July 02, 2011, 07:08:41 PM »
I'd like to buy some quality heirloom seeds that won't go bad. I don't currently live in a place where I could plant a garden but should the SHTF, I can get out of town and go to my mom's or dad's where they have land that I can use to plant a garden. Where did you buy yours?
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Offline Cedar

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Re: Anyone buy a seed vault?
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2015, 07:52:44 AM »
Do make sure you know how to grow a garden. I see way too many people getting a ready made seed vault (which do not last forever by the way), and they have no idea what to do when it is time to plant those seeds. Another issue is that some of the seed vaults do not take into consideration your climate (do you have long hot dry summers? Or cool long wet springs?)

Also in a SHTF situation, is there water in your scenario? Or are you going to be packing water to the plants? Or are you able to have crops which are not going to require alot of water? Some years here, I only have to water my garden 10x, if that, during the growing season.

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Offline Fredu89

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Re: Anyone buy a seed vault?
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2015, 08:56:26 AM »
I would never buy a seed vault, just buy the seeds that you want to grow and you will end up with a cheaper price too.

I have to agree with Cedar, you have to learn how to garden before you would need to use it.
When I started gardening it was an absolute disaster. This is my fourth season and now I feel like I know what I am doing. And remember that in gardening you can sometimes exchange time requirements with money requirements and vice versa.

If you have enough resources (money/material) then go with a raised garden bed type of garden. That is at least what I would recommend.
If you are going to plant a lot of potatoes etc then it might not be optimal, but for leafy greens and other annual veggies it is possibly the best way to go.
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Re: Anyone buy a seed vault?
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2015, 09:31:17 AM »
I have purchased them in the past, but I wouldn't purchase another. So many are a waste because they have plants that aren't real calorie crops, or they're calorie crops that take a ton of fertilizer or water that I don't have.

You can't buy potato seeds, and as far as I'm concerned, that's the only calorie crop that's going to keep me alive through the winter. So I grow potatoes on my property. I grow more than I can eat and I give them away. I have a surplus in the spring to replant enough to produce hundreds of pounds. I plant what I have room for and toss the rest.

There's plenty of people who can grow other things, this is what works for me. It's not my only crop, it's the only crop that works for me in that capacity.  I grow enough asparagus to make a few weeks of great dinners, but don't have a large enough garden to make enough to can, nor to I have the water to support more. I grow broccoli, but it doesn't can well. In any case, find stuff you know you can grow and learn to grow it well. Putting a vault of stuff you've never grown before just gives you a false sense of food security.

Offline Black November

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Re: Anyone buy a seed vault?
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2015, 01:12:17 PM »
Suppose you buy a seed bank and the SHTF........What are you going to eat for the 3 months it takes to grow the plants?

an even better question is what if the SHTF in November, and you can't even start planting for 5 months?

Offline allofthemonkeys

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Re: Anyone buy a seed vault?
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2015, 08:20:43 PM »
My mil has two.  This year she just moved into a new house so she isn't ready to plant this year, but she also has a year of food storage. (Mormon)  She can care for much of the family for that year, and the seeds can add to that food storage in time.
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Offline Here Again

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Re: Anyone buy a seed vault?
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2015, 01:51:46 PM »
I love mine, but I use it and replenish each year.  A few years back a small time online supplier offered a "make your own" seed vault....you got to pick what went in it, I did and am very happy.  He doesn't let you pick anymore, but his vaults are only $30 and has the seeds for a "standard" garden.  Of course no one has a standard yard, but these are the "standard" seeds people buy ....Blue Lake bush beans, California Wonder peppers, etc.  Last I checked it was still less expensive to buy his vault then to buy each packet of seeds.  I just buy the seeds I need and "re-pack" my vault each year.  I've always had great luck with his seeds.....My Patriot Supply dot Com

Offline Aunt

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Re: Anyone buy a seed vault?
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2015, 11:00:31 AM »
Sustainable Seed has heirloom seeds and seed collections http://sustainableseedco.com/heirloom-vegetable-seeds/.  Also some seed can be purchased by the pound. 
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Offline Cedar

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Re: Anyone buy a seed vault?
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2015, 11:52:44 AM »
I know I posted before, but here is a bit more info to go with it... as I was in a hurry before.

The best way to have a seed vault is to grow your own. HereAgain has the right idea. Many of the varieties would not do well in my climate here which tends to be cold wet springs until mid-June. It can freeze here in September, although it can be as late as December. Where I lived in Canada it was a 90-day window at best for growing. Maybe.

Growing seeds out for your needs, in your location will make 'custom made seeds for your needs' and area, usually within 3 years time. So starting before you completely reply on them is smarter than storing them until needed, especially if you are a newbie gardener.

I know how much in space in plants and garden space it requires to feed a family of 4. Here where I am, that is 60-80 tomato plants. Around 100-160 potato plants. It generally takes 3 pounds of produce to fill a quart jar. You need around 772 quart jars of food to feed a family of 4 for an entire year. So you need at least 2,316 pounds of food grown to fill those jars. Are you going to have to haul water by hand? Ukraine right now has issues with food coming in... and major infrastructure damage and sabotage to water and electric. In my area, vegetables require 2" of water a week, some like lettuce and peas which require a bit more. For you math-minded people, how many 5 gallon buckets is 2" of water for a 4,000 sf garden?

If we have an earthquake here in the western side of Oregon, the things I am reading is that it could take 3-12 months to restore water. Portland has at least 609,456 people who live in it, not including the towns and cities that Portland has swallowed up. Buckets might be in short supply?

Cedar
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Offline kme

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Re: Anyone buy a seed vault?
« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2016, 04:00:31 AM »
I hope there's no rules about not reviving old threads, I'm new to this forum, and wanted to chime in.

100% agree with not bothering with a seed bank/vault.
It's always best to purchase local seeds. Just because something is heirloom/open pollinated doesn't mean it will do very well for you, if it has been grown and saved for generations in a different climate to yours.
I've been tempted to buy seed banks, but found the varieties are either ones I could buy cheaper and closer to home, or after research, they wouldn't do too well in my climate anyway. I think a seed bank is a convenient "one size fits all", which may suit you if you aren't "into" gardening, but it isn't my style.

Many seeds last a few years without doing anything special to them anyway. (Although spinach, allium and parsnip seeds have very short viability of 1 year.) Keep in mind that the "expiry date", or "best before date" really means that the germination rate starts to drop below "industry standards", whatever the standards are in your country. So something that is a few years past its 'best before' may still produce some plants, (maybe 10% to 20%, instead of 80% to 90%). So don't throw away your old seeds as completely worthless. In a shtf scenario, growing a few tomato plants is better than no tomato plants, and then the successful ones are probably going to have long shelf life traits in their genes.

You can extend the life of the seeds by
a) buying from a reliable, independent, local company, who have control over the production of the seeds from growing, to storing, and transporting. If they state the germination rate on the packaging and have a no questions asked returns policy, then they are willing to back their seed quality and germination rates. I really don't recommend buying seeds from mega chain hardware stores and supermarkets, they are usually really poor quality. I can't stress this enough, I grow seedlings and teach propagation for a living, I can't tell you how many people come to me thinking they have black thumbs, but it's just that they are consistently buying bad seeds without realising it.
b) keep seeds in airtight containers, with a silica gel sachet,
c) keep seeds at a stable temperature and humidity. (Don't store them in the garden shed, or leave them in your car. Don't take the whole packet with you out into the garden.) You can also put a sprinkle of food grade D.E. in your packets to stop weevils and other bugs. They could also be treated just like any bulk dried food, vacuum packed, o2 absorbers, etc.

It makes sense to purchase enough seed for a minimum of two seasons. If you have a failure of your crop, then you still have a second chance next year. For preps, you might want to purchase more than two season's worth of seeds, especially if you think you want to barter seeds, or expect that your seeds will be growing food for a lot more people than just your immediate family.

Oh, and don't forget, make friends with gardeners. The best source of local, heirloom, climate specific seeds and plants is actually your next door neighbour. Stick your head over the fence, ask a few gardening advice questions, and before you know it you'll be having your pockets stuffed with "aunty jean's beans", or given a newspaper wrapped cutting of a special fig that was smuggled over here during ww2 by Nonno. :D

Offline 4Gators

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Re: Anyone buy a seed vault?
« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2017, 11:47:33 AM »
I buy the mypatriotsupply seed vault every couple of years.  The seeds you get are pretty common crops for a variety of climates, it has everything I want to grow in it so it's cheaper than purchasing individual seed packets.  You get a ton seeds in each seed pack so for a standard garden, one vault will last a couple of years for most of the varieties.  The quality of the seeds, germination & production have all been impressive. 

I do fill in with additional varieties from this company as well as others.  Personally, I haven't had much luck saving seeds from one year to the next, but that's 100% on me, and is not a reflection what-so-ever to any seed source or company, as I'm just learning how to do this, and honestly, I fail miserably at actually following through.

Like others who have posted, if you don't know how to grow, you can have all the seeds in the world and you will still starve!  And even if you know how to grow a garden, and you know how to save your seeds, having a back up pack in case of crop failure or poor germination rates one year is a good idea imho.