Author Topic: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)  (Read 12677 times)

Offline surfivor

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acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« on: July 02, 2011, 08:51:42 PM »

 I have wondered about how can the body acclimate to living in a colder environment than we normally would otherwise. I know there seem to be many remarkable survival stories up in the mountains in the snow. I am curious what people may have heard about this sort of thing in survival or military training ..

 Another interesting twist seems to be tumo, how tibetan and other buddhist monks are able to walk barefoot in the snow. As hard to believe as that may sound, it is apparently completely true ..

 Here are some links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tummo

...
Tummo-meditation is commonly associated with descriptions of intense sensations of body heat, which are a partial effect, rather than a goal, of the practice. Stories and eyewitness accounts abound of yogi practitioners being able to generate sufficient heat to dry wet sheets draped around their naked bodies while sitting outside in the freezing cold, not just once, but multiple times.[2] Observations have also been discussed in medical articles (Ding-E Young and Taylor, 1998). Not unproblematic, Tummo must be practiced in conjunction with appropriate empowerment and under the direction of a traditionally qualified Tantric Guru. Extensive preparation and pure motivation, most specifically bodhichitta, are absolutely essential both to beneficial results and to the avoidance of physical pain and discomfort in rlung disorder or other imbalances.[3]

..
Scientific investigation

An attempt to study the physiological effects of Tummo has been made by Benson and colleagues (Benson et al., 1982; Cromie, 2002) who studied Indo-Tibetan Yogis in the Himalayas and in India in the 1980s. In the first experiment, in Upper Dharamsala (India), Benson et al. (1982) found that these subjects exhibited the capacity to increase the temperature of their fingers and toes by as much as 8.3°C. In a 2002 experiment, conducted in Normandy (France), two monks from the Buddhist tradition wore sensors that recorded changes in heat production and metabolism (Cromie, 2002).

------------------------

 Here is a description from a book that is reprinted with permission by the following website:

http://www.lifepositive.com/Spirit/world-religions/buddhism/tumo.asp

Little is known about the esoteric Tibetan Buddhist practice of tumo, or psychic heat yoga. In Magical Techniques of Tibet (New Age Books), author J.H. BRENNAN explains this yoga in detail. An extract:

The term tumo actually means 'heat' or 'warmth,' but only in the special sense of psychic heat. Tibetans recognize three types:

1. The tumo that arises spontaneously during ecstatic religious experience;

2. Mystic tumo, which is the fire of bliss itself;

3. Esoteric tumo that keeps the adept physically warm. The third type of tumo is related to the subtle fire that warms the seminal fluid in a man and is the source of its energy. When the warmth is heightened, the energy runs throughout the rtsa or energy channels of the body.

Tumo initiation is essentially the passing of angkur (ability) from guru to student. Basic tumo training proceeds through preliminary preparation, practice, and practical application. Each stage in turn has several steps.

PRELIMINARY EXERCISES

Exercise 1: Visualizing the Goddess

In the first of five preliminary exercises, you are required to visualize yourself as the naked, virginal, 16-year-old Vajra-Yogini, a Tantric divinity who personifies spiritual energy. This goddess has a luminous ruby - red skin and a visible third eye in the middle of her forehead.

In her right hand she holds a gleaming curved knife high above her head to cut off all intrusive thought processes. In her left hand she holds a blood-filled human skull against her breast. On the head of the goddess is a tiara made from five dried human skulls, while around her neck is a necklace of 50 human heads dripping blood.

She wears armbands, wristbands, and anklets, but her only other item of adornment is a Mirror of Karma breastplate held in place by double strings of beads made from human bones that circle her waist and pass over her shoulders.

There is a long-staff in the crook of her left arm and a flame-like aura around her. The goddess is dancing with her right leg bent and the foot lifted up while her left foot tramples a prostrate human. In your initial visualization, see yourself in the form of this goddess about your own size. Once the image is established, imagine yourself growing.

Continue to grow until your goddess form is large enough to encompass the entire universe. Spend a little time in contemplating this state. Next, gradually reduce in size until you are no larger than a mustard seed.

Then shrink the imagined visualization still further, so that it is microscopic in extent, yet retains all its fine detail. Contemplate yourself in this minuscule state as well. This completes the first preliminary exercise.

Exercise 2: Visualizing the Channels

In the second exercise, you begin by imagining yourself as the normal-sized Vajra-Yogini goddess. Now concentrate on visualizing the dbu-ma energy channel that runs down the centre of your body as straight, hollow, about the size of an arrow-shaft, and a luminous red.

Expand the visualization until the channel becomes large enough to contain the universe. Again, shrink your visualized image until the hollow channel is no more than one-hundredth the thickness of a human hair.

Exercise 3: Posture and Breathing

Sit on the floor with your legs crossed so that your feet rest on your thighs, the soles turned upward. Your right leg should be uppermost. Place your hands in your lap at a level just below your navel with the back bend of the wrists pressed against your thighs.

Your thumb, forefinger, and little finger should be extended, and the other two bent into the palm. Straighten your spine and expand your diaphragm as far as it will go. Press your chin against your throat, place your tongue against the roof of your mouth, and fix your eyes on the tip of your nose.

Exhale completely to rid your lungs of stale air. Repeat this three times, then inhale as fully as possible and raise your diaphragm slightly so that your chest takes on the appearance of a pot. Hold your breath as long as you can without undue strain.

As you breathe out, imagine that five-colour rays emerge from every pore of your body to fill the entire world. The colours, which equate to the elements, are blue, green, red, white, and yellow.

On the in-breath, imagine these rays returning through the pores to fill your body with multicoloured light. Repeat the exercise seven times. Next, imagine that each ray changes into a five-colour version of the syllable 'hum'.

On your out-breath, visualize the world as filled with these syllables and listen to the sound they make. On the in-breath, imagine the syllables entering and filling your body. Repeat this breathing/visualization sequence seven times.

Now on the out-breath imagine that the 'hum' syllables become minute representations of angry deities. Imagine that on the out-breath the deities go out to fill the world, while on the in-breath they return to fill your body. Again repeat the sequence seven times.

The next step represents a critical stage in the exercise. You are required to imagine that every pore of your body is inhabited by one of these tiny deities with his face turned outward.

As a result, you see yourself as having grown a second protective skin composed of fierce and angry deities, which functions rather like a suit of armour.

Exercise 4: Visualizing the Letters

You begin the fourth preliminary exercise by visualizing the hollow ro-ma (right-hand energy channel) and rkyang-ma (left-hand energy channel). Imagine the five vowels of the English alphabet within the left channel and the 21 consonants in the right channel.

Each letter should have a fine outline and be seen as coloured red. Imagine them arranged in a vertical line, one above the other. Establish a breathing routine that alternates left and right nostrils, then visualize the letters streaming out with your out-breath, one after another.

On the in-breath, imagine them returning, but entering your body through your penis or vagina.

Exercise 5: Visualizing the Root Guru

This exercise requires you to visualize your own 'root guru' seated cross-legged in your heart chakra. Visualize the whole succession of discarnate gurus, in ascending order of importance, one above the head of the other in a vertical line along the central channel.

Once you have established the chain, you should pray to these gurus. When the prayer is finished, imagine the entire chain of gurus merging into the body of the root guru which in turn merges into the essence of bliss. Allow the experience of bliss to fill your entire body.

Psychic heat Generation

With the completion of these preliminaries, you are now ready to embark on the second stage of tumo, which involves the actual generation of psychic heat. Begin this stage by adopting the posture described in Preliminary Exercise 3.

Consciously link your thought process with the rhythm of your breathing. The Tibetan secret tradition teaches that your thought processes typically change after a period measured by a single in-breath plus a single out-breath.

Since breathing and thought processes depend on one another, control of the breath is the first step toward control of the mind.

Breath Control 1: Calm Breathing

The recommended breath control sequence begins with the establishment of what the Tibetans call 'Calm Breathing' which, in turn, is broken down into two separate parts. The first of these is known as the Nine Bellows Blowings.

Nine Bellows Blowings

• Close off your left nostril with your forefinger so that you are breathing only through the right nostril.

• Turn your head slowly from right to left while inhaling and exhaling three times through the right nostril.

• Now close off your right nostril and inhale/exhale three times while moving your head from left to right.

• Finally, with your head steady and looking straight ahead, inhale/exhale three times through both nostrils.

This sequence should be repeated three times. For the first of these three sequences you should breathe so gently that the breaths are scarcely perceptible.

For the second, you need to breathe more strongly, while for the third, your breath should empty the lungs completely on exhalation and fill them totally on inhalation.

Four Combined Breathing

Move on to the second element of 'Calm Breathing', which is known as the Four Combined Breathing. For this, you should first bend your head forward so that your neck takes on the shape of a hook.

Now draw in air through both nostrils from a distance of about 16 finger-widths without making a sound. The air from this silent in-breath should reach the bottom of your lungs. Contract your diaphragm to raise the thorax so that your chest puffs out.

You will find this pot-like expansion of your chest quickly becomes difficult to sustain. When it does, you are instructed to draw in a series of short breaths using muscular action to direct these inhalations to the right and left lungs respectively so that pressure is equalized in both lungs.

Once you have reached your limit, breathe out through both nostrils, gently at first, then with greater force, then gently again, all on a single exhalation. This process is described as 'shooting the breath forth like an arrow'.

Breath Control 2: Violent Breathing

The second aspect of tumo breath control, 'Violent Breathing', is broken down into five separate techniques. The first of these is emptying the lungs completely, then slowly refilling them to their fullest extent. The emphasis here is on slowly.

The purpose of the exercise is to prevent the rebound effect-a tendency to take quick, short breaths. The second technique is the 'art of inbreathing to cause the air to enter into all its natural channels'.

This technique should be performed in the conscious knowledge that you are breathing in energy with each breath. The third technique, known as the 'art of maximum lung expansion', is designed to take control of the breath.

This refers to breath retention, which permits a fuller extraction of the vital energy from the air. Technique four seeks complete mastery over the breathing process so that the vital energy extracted from the air enters the various rtsa channels.

In this technique, imagine the energy's light gently spreading throughout your entire body.

The final technique of the sequence seeks to mingle the internalized life force with the great reservoir of cosmic energy all around you. This is referred to as the 'art of relaxing the breathing', a name that suggests the process involves an out-breath.

The Mental Images

With the completion of breathing exercises, we come to the third and final part of the tumo technique. By now it should come as little surprise to learn that it involves the manipulation of mental images. The first of these images is that of the Vajra-Yogini.

But now, instead of imagining yourself as this deity, you should create an image of the goddess standing at normal human size before you. This image becomes your contact point with the universal energy and part of a visualized 'generator' that will produce the psychic heat.

The second visualization is of the central dbu-ma channel with its four major chakras flanked by the ro-ma and rkyang-ma channels. Begin by visualizing the hollow, perpendicular central channel, red in colour but transparent and bright.

Next, visualize the two peripheral channels that extend over the top of the brain and pass through the openings of the nostrils to travel downward, flanking the central channel until they curve inward to join at the bottom.

With the three channels clearly visualized, you should add the chakras to your image. The crown chakra should be visualized as radiating 32 'energy spokes'-minor rtsa channels-downward into the head. These are met by 16 more, which radiate from the throat centre, while 64 radiate from the navel centre.

Now comes what is understood as the core visualization of tumo, and a wholly unexpected one it turns out to be. According to the ancient texts, the secret of producing psychic heat lies in the use of half of the Tibetan letter A. Whichever half you select, the shape should be visualized at the point where the three major channels meet four finger-widths below the navel.

See it outlined hair-thin, reddish-brown in colour and hot to the touch, floating and undulating. As it moves, the shape makes a sound like the spluttering of a lighted taper. Next, visualize the Tibetan letter 'hum' on the median channel within the crown chakra at the top of your head.

The letter should be visualized white with a single drop of nectar forming on the 'tail' at the bottom. Draw in a breath to bring the life energy into the left and right channels and see them expand in your mind's eye.

Watch the vital force enter the middle channel and travel down to reach the visualized half, which fills out from its original outline until it becomes a fully-shaped red form.

As you breathe out, imagine that the air leaves the median channel in a bluish stream. Continue this sequence of breathing and visualization until it is well established. Then change the sequence slightly so that on the in-breath a tiny, pointed flame flares up from the outlined image.

The flame should be upright, bright red in colour, and transparent. It should also flicker in such a way that it appears to be spinning. Now, with each in-breath, imagine that the flame rises half a finger-width higher so that by the time you complete eight breathing cycles, it reaches the navel chakra.

Two cycles later the flame will have extended into every petal of this centre. Over the next 10 breath cycles, the imagined fire thus kindled moves down to the lower part of your body, filling your lower abdomen, legs, feet and toes. In 10 further breath cycles, it moves upward in stages, filling your body as far as the heart chakra.

In the next 10 cycles, it reaches the throat chakra, then, with 10 more breaths it reaches the crown chakra at the top of your head, where you have already established the letter 'hum'. As the imagined fire reaches this chakra, it slowly dissolves the symbol over the next 10 breath cycles into a pearlescent 'moon fluid', which spreads to fill the entire lotus.

This moon fluid is the key to the tumo effect. Watch in your mind's eye as it overflows from the crown chakra to fill the entire body. The overall sequence of 108 breath cycles constitutes a single tumo course. To become proficient, you need to repeat six courses over each 24-hour period in the early stage of your training.

TRIGGERING TUMO

You can trigger the tumo heat in three ways. The simplest is the use of breathing: push the inhaled air to the bottom of your lungs and contract your diaphragm to expand the chest.

The two remaining methods are as follows:

• While seated in a simple cross-legged position, grasp the underneath of your thighs with your hands. Use your stomach and abdominal muscles to circle the belly area three times to the right and three times to the left while keeping the torso still.

Churn the stomach vigorosly by rippling the muscles from top to bottom, then shake your body like a dog that has just come out of the water. While you are doing so, raise yourself a little on your crossed legs, then drop back again onto your cushion, in effect bouncing a little off the floor.

Repeat this whole exercise three times, ending with a vigorous bounce.

• Visualize yourself as the Vajra-Yogini with the three main channels, the charkas, and the visualized half of the Tibetan A symbol. Imagine blazing suns in the palms of your hands and the soles of your feet. Bring your hands and feet together so that the suns meet.

Visualize another sun at the junction of the main channels below the navel. Rub together the suns in the palms of your hands and the soles of your feet.

Fire will flare up to strike the sun below the navel, then the visualized symbol, and will go on to permeate your whole body. On your next out-breath, visualize the tumo heat going out to fill the world.

Extracted with permission from Magical Techniques of Tibet, by J.H. Brennan, New Age Books, 195 pages

Offline mossyback

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2011, 09:15:05 PM »
Thanks for the interesting info. While I am not at their level I feel that the average person can get used to a broader range in temperatures than is normally accepted.

I do not use airconditioning in my house the temperatures in July and August run between 70-75 degrees Fahrenheit and in the late afternoon it runs between 80-95 degrees Fahrenheit. I am comfortable in these temperature ranges because I have lived with them for many years.

In the winter I normally keep my house at 55 degrees Fahrenheit, but will crank up the heat if company comes over. At 55 I normally sit around the house in a pair of shorts, no shoes or shirt. I heat with wood so it is not a problem to crank up the heat, I just do not feel I need it any warming. I also walk out side in the winter barefoot including when there is snow on the ground, but I usually do not stay out for more than about 30 minutes.

I can't really tell you how I do this as it is something that I have done for years. When my daughter was living with me as a teenage she had no real complaints about these temperatures however she did wear more clothes and really preferred the house to be around 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

Offline surfivor

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2011, 02:53:35 AM »
hi mossyback,

 That is interesting, especially that you have gone barefoot in the snow for up to 30 minutes. I guess I should try that.


 Here is a couple of book sample that talks about this, as a well as a mountaineer from the American west who survived the cold. I was not able to cut and past the text here or find it anywhere else, so you have to click the links here to read any of it:

this is from the book: Explorers of the infinite: the secret spiritual lives of extreme athletes

http://books.google.com/books?id=e2juQnIFRUgC&pg=PT157&lpg=PT157&dq=tumo+stephen+koch+tetons&source=bl&ots=-rutE7PUmi&sig=-fkywktx_qLHRI5p8yJ60RycK6Y&hl=en&ei=idgPTpG5Bsnz0gHDl_XEDg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CC4Q6AEwAw#v=onepage&q&f=false

from the book Magic and Mystery in Tibet 1932

http://books.google.com/books?id=AaC4YSlO6q0C&pg=PA217&dq=tumo&hl=en&ei=8hEPTviNN-Tl0QHA57S8Dg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=7&ved=0CEYQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=tumo&f=false




Here is another book with it's summary:

http://www.amazon.com/Occult-Tibet-Secret-Practices-Himalayan/dp/0738700673

Intimations of esoteric spiritual practices swirl around Tibet like clouds over Everest. True to form, this book features alluring and moving images of enduring profound cold by raising body temperatures (tumo), extending the dying process into rich realms of visions and reincarnations and lucid dreaming (wherein the dreamer recognizes the dream state and actively manipulates it). These are just a few of the metaphysical realms explored by the well-seasoned Irish author Brennan (The Magical I Ching, Magick for Beginners and Time Travel). He takes pains to give Western parallel documentation to the fantastic forms he describes, but most interested readers will not need this support to explore these topics. The reason for this is Brennan's sound reliance on Tibetan energy theories, such as the chakras and their rtsa (energy courses), rlung (energies themselves) and thig-li (pervading essences). He claims, probably rightly, that "it is the manipulation of the energy system that underlies almost every spiritual and magical marvel Tibet has ever produced." Brennan repeatedly points to the rigorous exercises of breathing, poses, chants and physical challenges that may give rise to such feats in highly disciplined people, but perhaps only over years or lifetimes of study. For adepts of mystical practices or the legions of readers fascinated with all things Tibetan, Brennan provides a highly interesting, accessible, even somewhat practical guide to elusive aspects of a unique culture arising out of a high place of thin, cold air.


-----------------------------------------------------

intros from amazon on the other two books from above:


http://www.amazon.com/Magic-Mystery-Tibet-Alexandra-David/dp/141797754X


David-Neel describes her spiritual experiences in Tibet, meeting lamas and visiting monasteries, practicing meditation and breathing exercises, and witnessing psychic phenomena like the control of body heat, having visions, and past life recollection. In one chapter she describes the lung-gom-pas runners who run incredible distances while in a trance, warming themselves in the snow through psychic heat.

I really liked these adventure books for their honest descriptions of an earlier, purer Tibetan culture, long before the Chinese invasion. She writes honestly and candidly about the customs and values of the people she meets, neither romanticizing nor criticizing.


=====================================

http://www.amazon.com/Explorers-Infinite-Athletes-Experiences-Communication/dp/1585426512

In the life-or-death world of extreme adventure sports, there is one thing that athletes often keep quiet about: the “forbidden” territory of paranormal experiences. Ranging from fleeting moments of transcendence to full-blown encounters with ghosts and everything in between—visions, near-death experiences, psychic communication—many extreme athletes have experienced these moments of connection with the beyond, but have been reluctant to talk about them.

In Explorers of the Infinite, award-winning outdoors journalist and lifelong adventure sports devotee Maria Coffey probes the mystical and paranormal experiences of mountaineers, snowboarders, surfers, and more. She reviews cutting-edge science, and consults the history of philosophy and spirituality to answer the question: Could the state of intense “aliveness” that is the allure of extreme sports for so many actually be a route to a connection with the beyond?

Coffey investigates the scientific explanations for mystical phenomena, ranging from simple explanations to theories from consciousness studies and quantum physics, and leaves us wondering where science ends and spirituality begins.

An energetic, you-are-there look at the spiritual lives of extreme athletes, Explorers of the Infinite asks why extreme athletes take the risks that allow them to push the limits of consciousness, what they encounter there, and what we can learn from them.

Offline Shaunypoo

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2011, 06:53:54 AM »
All I take are cold showers.  I started by finishing my shower with 30 seconds full cold.  I would up it to 1 minute, 2 minutes, etc. till the whole shower was cold.  In the winter I am much more comfortable than anyone else in the family, but in the summer I sweat alot.  Now I am more acclimated to the cold.  It took most of a winter to get there, and now that I do it all the time, I don't know if I could go back to hot showers.  It is acually pretty easy.  Humans are very adaptable.

Offline surfivor

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2011, 08:02:33 AM »
All I take are cold showers.  I started by finishing my shower with 30 seconds full cold.  I would up it to 1 minute, 2 minutes, etc. till the whole shower was cold.  In the winter I am much more comfortable than anyone else in the family, but in the summer I sweat alot.  Now I am more acclimated to the cold.  It took most of a winter to get there, and now that I do it all the time, I don't know if I could go back to hot showers.  It is acually pretty easy.  Humans are very adaptable.

 great post, we are all a bunch of wimps apparently and they train us to be that way. I used to canoe in the ocean and up a half frozen river when I was 8 or 10 years old. I am told nowadays to allow a kid to do that or force him to go camping would be considered child abuse.

 I imagine I could get used to cold showers if I had to, but I may wait until I have to. I am not sure if I could not get Thai food anymore if I could live with that however .. just kidding

Offline Shaunypoo

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2011, 08:29:07 AM »
I started in college when I was on the rowing team and we had to be on the Ohio River by 6 am in the spring.  Butt cold.  That water is foul enough, but I guess that which didn't kill me...

Offline tomtom

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2011, 03:25:13 PM »
Very interesting.

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2011, 03:43:24 PM »
I can't remember the name of the book now, but I remember reading a survival book that recommended tying and untying knots in small diameter rope in a bathtub filled with ice water and gradually increasing the duration and the amount of ice.  Sounds like a painful technique, but I see how it could work.  Gradually you're going to train your body to change circulation pathways to meet heating demands.

Offline tomtom

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2011, 03:50:34 PM »
Just remembered where I saw cold showers being a good thing. http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/books/the_hour_body_DO5FDjwAeNFVrFfMvFnvoJ 4-Hour Body.

Quote
6. Take 5-10 minute cold showers before breakfast and/or bed. Short-term exposure leads to fatty acid release, he claims, and also increases immunity.

Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/books/the_hour_body_DO5FDjwAeNFVrFfMvFnvoJ#ixzz1a2b7UnzC

Offline surfivor

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2011, 06:10:30 PM »
I can't remember the name of the book now, but I remember reading a survival book that recommended tying and untying knots in small diameter rope in a bathtub filled with ice water and gradually increasing the duration and the amount of ice.  Sounds like a painful technique, but I see how it could work.  Gradually you're going to train your body to change circulation pathways to meet heating demands.

 This sort of reminds me of something written by swami kriyananda where his guru kept asking him to level off one more mound ..
It illustrates how to work with will power by focusing on one aspect of a task at hand in the present and not the entire task ahead ..

http://www.anandaindia.org/inspiration/books/path/20.html

One hot day at noon Norman and I stood up from our digging and stretched, grateful that lunchtime had arrived. We enjoyed our work, but there was no denying that it was also tiring. Besides, we were famished. Briefly we surveyed the yawning pit at our feet.

"God, what a hole!" exclaimed Norman. We gazed out over the mounds of sand we'd deposited about the grounds with the wheelbarrow. The very sight of them, lumped there in mute testimony to our exertions, only reinforced our fatigue.

At that moment Master came out of doors.

"Those mounds don't look very attractive," he remarked. "I wonder if they couldn't be leveled out. Would one of you mind fetching a two-by-four?"

Armed with the board, we stood before him apprehensively and awaited further instructions.

"Each of you hold the two-by-four at one end," Master said. "Then–just come over to this mound here. Pull the sand back toward you by pressing down hard on the board, and moving it slowly back and forth between you."

Probably even this meager description suffices to convey some idea of how difficult the job was. By the time we'd leveled one mound, Norman and I were panting heavily. Well, we reflected, at least we'd demonstrated that the job could be done. Master, now that his curiosity was satisfied, would no doubt tell us to go and have our lunch.

"Very good," he commented approvingly. "I thought that method would work. Now then, why don't we try it just once more–on that mound over there?"

Adjusting our expectations accordingly, we started in a second time.

"Very good!" Master commented once again. Evidently not wishing to place obstacles in the way of the momentum we'd built up, he said, "Let's do just one more–this one over here."

And after that: "One more."

And then again: "Just one more."

I don't know how many mounds we leveled, but Norman, strong as he was, was beginning to moan softly under his breath. "Just one more," Master said again.

Suddenly, getting the joke at last, I stood up and laughed. Master smiled back at me.

"I was playing with you! Now–go and have your lunch."


Thox Spuddy

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2011, 06:23:43 PM »
More than once my wife has suggested I take cold showers.  ;)

Offline Shaunypoo

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2011, 07:53:18 AM »
Part of it was I was having trouble falling asleep after taking a hot shower.  Someone suggested taking cold showers because it helps the body cool down.  After doing some research in physiology class, it turns out that taking a cold shower before bed will help to lower your core body temperature, which it does naturally when you fall asleep.  It also helps your skin to a degree in that the cool temperature causes your pores to close which prevents you from losing so much moisture while you are sleeping.  There are lots of small benefits which add up, not the least of which is acclimitization.

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2011, 07:57:10 AM »
More than once my wife has suggested I take cold showers.  ;)

I don't know if that is a good suggestion.  Cold showers actually help to raise sperm count, a byproduct of which is the increase in the hormones that increase your sex drive.  She might want to rethink that one, or does she? :o

Thox Spuddy

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2011, 02:03:19 PM »
Shaunpoo: of course I was playing the comedian; it is a myth that it is always the man with the stronger sex drive, at least that is my observation.

Offline Shaunypoo

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #14 on: October 11, 2011, 07:51:37 AM »
My wife tells me to take a cold shower and I tell her it is only going to make it worse.

Offline surfivor

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #15 on: October 11, 2011, 07:58:33 PM »
It makes sense what you are saying about cold water, and many yogis bath daily in the Himalayas in cold water. It probably helps to energize the body, surfing is kind of like that as well ..

  but as far sex, maybe look  into tantric yoga which in many ways places a greater emphasis on deeper communication, intimacy, and foreplay rather so much on the sex act itself .. sort of hard to talk about or describe without being profane. Alot of this stuff gets repackaged and reinterpreted especially in the west but it is closely related to meditation ..

 Also, people in Asia that are traditional I guess tend to not drink cold drinks apparently

Offline Shaunypoo

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #16 on: October 12, 2011, 07:02:57 AM »
I barely have time to work out, much less delve into any form of yoga.  I am sure it would be beneficial, but for now will stick with cold showers.

This got off topic quick, didn't it?

Offline surfivor

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #17 on: October 13, 2011, 03:23:38 AM »
It doesn't really bother me if it's interesting and it get a little off topic ..

 Here are some things to consider:

 Does it seem like sex is kind of like a drug or a distraction ? That is various stress factors may manifest in life, frustration, anxiety, self doubts, various negative states of mind. The drug like nature of sex is there because it something to take your mind away from those unpleasant emotional states. It is quite natural, but an interesting thing to consider. Your job, hard work, busy life or whatever may contribute to the sex drive in some sense ..

 The other approach is to try to use other means to deal with stress, various types of meditation and so. Yogananda says that exercise is often a good outlet for male energy and helps you to relax which seems to be true. All that does take time. It seems we live a busy life and perhaps it is too bad and I often think society may be out of balance.

 It seems what women want is romance, they would like candles, back rubs, flowers, touching, taking a walk while holding hands, playfulness. These are sort of like foreplay .. What I read about tantra that made alot of sense to me is that if you want to have better sex then focus on pleasing the woman in whatever way it may be, don't focus on pleasing yourself so much. If you focus on pleasing the woman, then she will naturally want to please you and then you too will experience greater pleasure and bliss .. At least in theory that sort of sounds good I think but of course relationships can have many complexities. It seems there has to be some sort of communication at any rate ..

 Male energy is somewhat limited, sex is better and has a certain freshness when done less often and the energy is conserved and there is no rush but things are taken very slowly (foreplay etc) there is no actual goal, you don't have to finish things off. This is because if it is really that sex is a drug, you are still getting a dose and it is all therapeutic even if you only get a hug or go for a walk and hold hands or just fool around a little. It's like if you are hungry then food taste much better so don't insatiate yourself. Alot of people seem to disagree with me on this sort of thing, it's one thing that has puzzled me because it kind of makes perfect sense to me .. It also seems to be entirely consistent with many of the old school Asian ways. I was thinking about this the other day and it is perhaps that people want to create this intense physical sensation which is highly aerobic and so on. I sometimes think that what if the old school asians and yogis are right that is a fleeting sort of thing to try to maintain and it may deplete your vital force and especially as you get older if you are a guy ? It kind of feels like to me intuitively that they are right, although maybe it depends and not always but I don't want to go more into that as it almost seems inappropriate material etc ..

 I don't really know about the circumstances of what you are saying with your wife, but these are some of the principles I would consider myself in any sort of such relationship as far as sex goes. On the other hand relationships are very complex and for me (an unmarried person), there may be some physical attraction and temptations to various women, but relationships are of course more complex than the sexual and there are reasons for me to try to avoid having sex, though I am not sure if I will get married or find the right person etc some day.
 
« Last Edit: October 13, 2011, 03:52:36 AM by surfivor »

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #18 on: October 13, 2011, 06:53:52 AM »
Great points.  My dad once told me, "Son, pleasing a different woman every day is easy, but pleasing the same woman every day is the challenge."  I have grown to see the wisdom in that statement.

And I like my cold showers.

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #19 on: October 13, 2011, 07:13:21 PM »
:o
The extreme need for food or sex will drive a person to do things that are insane.

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #20 on: October 20, 2011, 10:50:01 PM »
:o
The extreme need for food or sex will drive a person to do things that are insane.

Oi! You got that right. Especially sex.

On the subject of tumo, and similar, I read an account of two English sailors who
were shipwrecked on the coast of southern Tierra del Fuego. They had no shoes and only a single thin blanket between them.

It's kinda chilly there. All year long.

The survived six months without fire, and also without frostbite.

After they were rescued, they found normal civilized room temperatures stifling, and would have to go out into into the snow frequently and strip down to "get their breath".

Offline surfivor

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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #21 on: October 21, 2011, 12:16:55 PM »
Oi! You got that right. Especially sex.

On the subject of tumo, and similar, I read an account of two English sailors who
were shipwrecked on the coast of southern Tierra del Fuego. They had no shoes and only a single thin blanket between them.

It's kinda chilly there. All year long.

The survived six months without fire, and also without frostbite.

After they were rescued, they found normal civilized room temperatures stifling, and would have to go out into into the snow frequently and strip down to "get their breath".

 It was Davey Crockett or some such similar character who when he would visit someone in town, he refused to sleep in their house, instead he climbed up in a tree and slept there. I forget which book I read that in.

 A girlfriend of mine has had a swollen leg for a year and a half. The doctor gave her blood thinners and all kinds of things, wanted her to go for other tests. I managed to get her to stay at my camp up in the woods in October. The swelling in her leg started to go down for the first time ever. Not sure why, but it was alot colder there than what she is used to. Her house can be 62 degrees and she'll feel cold.

 Nowadays I find it almost maddening to sleep in a house unless the window is open and can't figure out how I survived all those years before. Some senior home's won't let people open the windows in order to save on heating which to me sounds like Nazi stuff ..


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Re: acclimation to the cold and generating body heat (tumo)
« Reply #22 on: April 25, 2013, 03:30:40 PM »
I think more than anything you have to be exposed. I think too many people just run from the house to the car and the car to the job. I knew a Vietnam vet when I was young who taught me to not wear a coat as long as possible in the fall. Not that you want to suffer but you have to be exposed. Most of us keep the house at 70 year round. So wrong. One October my wife was in Germany on business for 3 weeks. I turned the furnace off and when the indoor temp got below 50 I had a small fire in the fireplace. Just enough to bump it back up. She got home and screamed that the house was 55. I said it felt warm. I really believe in acclimation to climate. That's what our nomadic ancestors had to do. Or die.