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Author Topic: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?  (Read 122655 times)

Offline ChadK

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #330 on: June 15, 2012, 12:22:30 PM »
I used to carry some under armour knock off brand "long underwear", thinking they'd keep me warm as an added layer if needed.  However after a recent very cold night on a camping trip I was talking with a sales rep at an outdoor store, and he said that stuff is made for activity (moisture/heat wicking) not warmth while sleeping. 
Made sense but just goes to show we need to use our gear to make sure it is operational for our intended purpose before packing it somewhere for an emergency  :)

I've switched to under layers intended for warmth now in case I need it overnight.

Offline SA Friday

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #331 on: June 16, 2012, 03:09:58 PM »
I skipped a few pages of posts, but one thing I've carried for years and two different war zones is a couple of heavy duty sewing needles and a regular sized spool of 10 lb green kevlar fishing line.  It's exponentially stronger than thread and just a tad thicker.  I've used it to sew just about anything back together and make pouches, and belt pouches.  You blow a seam on your bag or tent, it's going to work to fix.  Cheap thread will fail.  Even can lash sticks together for an A frame etc with it.

It works for fishing too I'm told.

Offline bcksknr

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #332 on: July 03, 2012, 10:33:54 PM »
I just went through my BOB today to trim a few pounds. I took out some "meal replacement bars" (which still gives me 2400 calories a day for six days) and a big Buck sheath knife (I have a Buck folder, a Myerco machete/axe and a leatherman in there). I did put something in, however. I had an older, black Casio DW 5200 G-Shock that I hadn't worn in years (replaced it with a Casio solar model). We are so dependant on time in our "civilized" lives that I thought a watch could give a little continuity to the situation if SHTF. It doesn't weigh much, is indestructable and after years in a drawer it was off by 30 seconds. I put in a new lithium battery and stapped it to my bag. From a practical standpoint, I could time water purification with it. You can use a digital watch to find direction (yes you can!). It might be comforting to know the date and time, or how many hours one has walked. God help us if things get so bad we forget what day of the week it is!

Offline Bluegrass2003

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #333 on: July 07, 2012, 10:06:33 AM »
This will be my last post in response to you on my BOB. We have a difference of opinion. I will take the suggestion to lighten my gear and add more food because I agree with that. But leaving out what I consider vital gear to depend on any sticks and rocks I may or may not find I think is foolish.

Well put.
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Offline bcksknr

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #334 on: July 07, 2012, 11:26:08 AM »
I just did a quick experiment and thought I would pass this along. The hand sanitizer gel that's in my bag is highly flammable! This is probably obvious to everyone, but sometimes I'm a little slow on the uptake. I squeezed a dime size puddle out and lit it with a BIC. It, being mostly alchohol, burns with a nearly invisible blue flame for a nice long time. Voila, another dual-use item; kills germs/starts fires. If you put the gel on your forehead or a pulse point and fan it you get an immediate and intense cooling effect. It might help in heatstroke if there is no water available. I would think a gel saturated bandana would also work as a cooling device. I'm unsure about long term contact with skin and posible irritation. Best to check that out. BTW, if you mold the contents of a chapstick around a string, it makes a pretty decent candle/firestarter.

Offline rustyknife

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #335 on: July 08, 2012, 11:22:20 PM »
I skipped a few pages of posts, but one thing I've carried for years and two different war zones is a couple of heavy duty sewing needles and a regular sized spool of 10 lb green kevlar fishing line.  It's exponentially stronger than thread and just a tad thicker.  I've used it to sew just about anything back together and make pouches, and belt pouches.  You blow a seam on your bag or tent, it's going to work to fix.  Cheap thread will fail.  Even can lash sticks together for an A frame etc with it.

It works for fishing too I'm told.

My wife just told me about how she uses a spoon as a thimble when having to push a needle through some heavy material. She said it is a old quilting trick.
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Offline JamesB

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #336 on: August 13, 2012, 03:28:18 AM »
The importance of being prepared was made clear to me on Feb 22 2011 when my home city Christchurch was hit with a major earthquake. We were without power for 2 days in my suburb (power co's were incredibly quick to restore power, linesmen working all night) and it took 2 weeks for water to be restored.
I always have made a policy of having 2 weeks' supplies of food and water on my property. This made it easy for us, compared to those who had empty cupboards and were probably planning to do their shopping the next day!
Our house was relatively unharmed structurally. But I have a bug-out kit in the back of the garden, which is three 80 Litre weatherproof plastic boxes containing tent, tarp, stove, fuel, stove, food and clean water, clothes for all the family, sleeping bags and spare blankets.
In addition I built my kids a play hut, which also serves as a bug-out hide-out in event of adverse weather coinciding with emergency.
At the time of the earthquake I was at work 9km from home. I am a doctor at an after-hours clinic, so I was busy that day, and did not get home for another 12 hours. But I drive a 4WD, and always have enough for an unplanned night out stashed in the truck. And if necessary I can walk/jog home, but the roads were very passable after a few hours' chaos.
Cellphone system was overwhelmed with speech signal, but it was possible to text for an hour or two until the batteries of the cellular sites ran out. I was able to make contact with my wife and kids. After that VHF radio would have been useful.
It is also useful to never allow the gas in your truck to go below halfway just in case.

Offline carbon

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #337 on: August 13, 2012, 10:09:59 AM »
Just wanted to mention that it may be useful to have some of the electronics in your bag wrapped for emp protection. I have my radios and lights protected (untested foil and plastic method) when in the bag. I have an instruction as well for my wife so we know which channels to use.

I also have a plastic door wedge I can use to prop a door open (or close). It would help when I load stuff to the bov if we bug out. It would also add hindrance to a door in a room we decide to shelter in place in since you can use it to hold the door close. yes it could be forced open, but it would need to be forced open with difficulty and I would not be caught off guard.
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Offline Eriko

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #338 on: August 13, 2012, 02:43:03 PM »
Great post JamesB!
I've been overthinking how to have supplies or bug out kit outside of my house in a very small suburban lot. Your way of doing it would work for me.
Thanks for sharing & welcome aboard,
Eriko

The importance of being prepared was made clear to me on Feb 22 2011 when my home city Christchurch was hit with a major earthquake. We were without power for 2 days in my suburb (power co's were incredibly quick to restore power, linesmen working all night) and it took 2 weeks for water to be restored.
I always have made a policy of having 2 weeks' supplies of food and water on my property. This made it easy for us, compared to those who had empty cupboards and were probably planning to do their shopping the next day!
Our house was relatively unharmed structurally. But I have a bug-out kit in the back of the garden, which is three 80 Litre weatherproof plastic boxes containing tent, tarp, stove, fuel, stove, food and clean water, clothes for all the family, sleeping bags and spare blankets.
In addition I built my kids a play hut, which also serves as a bug-out hide-out in event of adverse weather coinciding with emergency.
At the time of the earthquake I was at work 9km from home. I am a doctor at an after-hours clinic, so I was busy that day, and did not get home for another 12 hours. But I drive a 4WD, and always have enough for an unplanned night out stashed in the truck. And if necessary I can walk/jog home, but the roads were very passable after a few hours' chaos.
Cellphone system was overwhelmed with speech signal, but it was possible to text for an hour or two until the batteries of the cellular sites ran out. I was able to make contact with my wife and kids. After that VHF radio would have been useful.
It is also useful to never allow the gas in your truck to go below halfway just in case.

Offline Scooter123456789

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #339 on: October 30, 2012, 09:19:40 PM »
Ok, I have looked allot of these post, and I am trying to figure out what size of BOB are you guys carrying.. It seems the list is pretty long of things in your bags, I just don't see how you carry it all with out a small trailer or mule, to tote it all. Any pics of bags  or links of what bag you use, would be great...

Offline SA Friday

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #340 on: November 03, 2012, 10:14:15 PM »
Ok, I have looked allot of these post, and I am trying to figure out what size of BOB are you guys carrying.. It seems the list is pretty long of things in your bags, I just don't see how you carry it all with out a small trailer or mule, to tote it all. Any pics of bags  or links of what bag you use, would be great...
I'm using a Camelback Mule that I've used since my 04 Iraq tour.  I have a different set of needs from my bag that others may or may not have.  So, I carry some additional stuff.  Living in CO, I spend time in the mountains and I commute into downtown Denver four times a week for college classes.  I know if I have to use it for whatever reason to get home from downtown, it may very well take me a couple of days and the terrain would vary from city to rural.  In the mountains, I may very well have absolutely nothing but what I have taken with me. 

Most other bags I've seen are this size and this type of bag.  http://thekeytosurvival.com/storetitles/packs/medtransportpk_foliage.html  It's a nice size, but if you plan on carrying something to cover up with in an overnight situation, I would plan on having to strap a wool blanket, poncho liner, or sleeping bag to the outside of it.

I have my kids carry a basic bag of stuff when we are camping in the mountains.  If they leave camp, they take the bag.  It's an old green canvas gas mask bag that opens on the top and carries like a messenger bag.  It's super minimal, but has the basic essentials they've been trained to use.  It's only a couple of pounds of stuff. 

Offline Vastnir

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #341 on: November 14, 2012, 02:09:14 PM »
Lots of great info in the thread. I would suggest making some copies of important documents and keeping them in the BOB. Why not store your passport there? Copies of birth and marrage certificates (spend the money to get officail copies if you can).

Offline Wildthang

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #342 on: November 20, 2012, 07:28:46 AM »
Just remember, the more you know, the less you have to carry! I would suggest that whoever builds a new BOB, to go on a 10 mile hike through some turf that really tells you how easy it is to carry all of that weight. I have seen some BOBs that would be near impossible to carry during a sustained hike through mountain or very hilly country.
All you really need are the basics and everything else is just weight! After a long hike, and wilderness camping trip, you will figure out that normally half of the stuff most people pack is not needed. Having the skills are more important than trying to pack a survival store along with you everywhere you go.
My backpack weighs around 25 pounds and has everything I really need and nothing more!

Offline The Professor

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #343 on: November 20, 2012, 12:58:21 PM »
Just remember, the more you know, the less you have to carry! I would suggest that whoever builds a new BOB, to go on a 10 mile hike through some turf that really tells you how easy it is to carry all of that weight. I have seen some BOBs that would be near impossible to carry during a sustained hike through mountain or very hilly country.
All you really need are the basics and everything else is just weight! After a long hike, and wilderness camping trip, you will figure out that normally half of the stuff most people pack is not needed. Having the skills are more important than trying to pack a survival store along with you everywhere you go.
My backpack weighs around 25 pounds and has everything I really need and nothing more!

Thank you, Wildthang, for your post.  Since this is a "Show and Tell"-type topic, would you care to show your BOB and what you keep in it?

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Offline nelson96

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #344 on: November 20, 2012, 02:00:33 PM »
Just remember, the more you know, the less you have to carry! I would suggest that whoever builds a new BOB, to go on a 10 mile hike through some turf that really tells you how easy it is to carry all of that weight. I have seen some BOBs that would be near impossible to carry during a sustained hike through mountain or very hilly country.
All you really need are the basics and everything else is just weight! After a long hike, and wilderness camping trip, you will figure out that normally half of the stuff most people pack is not needed. Having the skills are more important than trying to pack a survival store along with you everywhere you go.
My backpack weighs around 25 pounds and has everything I really need and nothing more!

So true, but I would rather have the ability to throw it out than wish I had it.  Many people simply don't know what they need and they pack their BOB based on their experience and knowledge, or simply what others recommend.  I agree that if you have the forethought to pack such a bag one should have the forethought to know how to survive with it, but betting most won't.  To another point, I think most pack a BOB not for the end of the world but for something like they got stranded (car broke down) and they need to walk the highway to help.

To help sell your point, it's a lot of fun to go out and use it and the reward of learning does a lot for your self worth.
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Offline Wildthang

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #345 on: November 21, 2012, 07:27:26 AM »
So true, but I would rather have the ability to throw it out than wish I had it.  Many people simply don't know what they need and they pack their BOB based on their experience and knowledge, or simply what others recommend.  I agree that if you have the forethought to pack such a bag one should have the forethought to know how to survive with it, but betting most won't.  To another point, I think most pack a BOB not for the end of the world but for something like they got stranded (car broke down) and they need to walk the highway to help.

To help sell your point, it's a lot of fun to go out and use it and the reward of learning does a lot for your self worth.

Very true nelson, but who wants to throw good stuff away! Maybe I'm a bit old fashion, but there are places that you can get stranded in a car that will require hiking out for several miles, not too likely but it does happen. It just appears to me that a lot of folks make a game out of seeing how much cool stuff they can get in a backpack and do not consider the weight at all. I keep a plastic container in my truck with all of the stranded on the side of the road stuff in it, but still keep my backpack light.
I am 6'-3" and in pretty good shape, but packing a 60 pound backpack on an all day hike is not something I  dont want to do. That is for young soldiers and people that are top physical shape, and even then it wears on them.
I just think everybody needs to consider the weight, and try it out for a day or 2!
When I put together my first backpack, I took a 1 week hiking trip through some pretty rough country, and discovered that there was a lot of things I had in my pack that I would probably never use, and I also relized how the weight wore me down after a few hours of hiking. That was when I was in my 20's and I was in perfect physical condition.
I quickly learned that I needed more food, less weight, and pretty much just the basics. I cut my first aid supplys down to bandaids, gauze, medical tape, merthiolate, and a bottle of aspirin and Pepto Bismol tablets. To this day I have only used a couple of bandaids and maybe an aspirin or 2, so those huge first aid kits are just rediculous to me!
Carrying a hatchet and a folding shovel is a lot of weight, and you can do without either one. Those fancy little stoves are cool but I just build a fire and cook on that.
The only time I pack heavy is in really cold weather and that consists of extra clothes and a low temp rated sleeping bag. Extreme cold weather merits packing heavy and there is no way around that!
Any backpack is better than being stranded with nothing so it's all good, and it is great to see so many people trying to be prepared, but everybody owes it to themselves to really use the pack and elliminate unecessary weight, and learn the skills that will always get you through with less merchandise.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2012, 07:44:59 AM by Wildthang »

Offline Medicineball

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #346 on: November 21, 2012, 08:16:14 AM »
Amen, Wildthang!

Offline Neilsan

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #347 on: November 29, 2012, 02:13:35 AM »
Today I went out and made an insanely minimalist bug out bag. I got 3 days of food and 2 gallons of water for 20 bucks (I'm on a serious budget) and threw it along with a full pair of clothes in my old hiking backpack. I'm trying to do the best with what I've got, rather than going out and buying stuff, so I'm organizing things that I have lying around like a toothbrush, extra pair of glasses, leatherman, flashlight, lighter, rope, etc etc....
Simply put, I want to be somewhat comfortable for 3 days if I need to drive or hike somewhere. All the other fun stuff will come later, but for now, something is better than nothing. My big question for you all is am I totally overreacting with 2 gallons of water? I live in Southern California, in a place that everyone around me seems to continue to forget is just a well irrigated desert. Most of the water is pumped in over The Grape Vine, and I don't think that should be relied on if I have to bug out.
There are a few reservoirs, and I'm sure I could find water heaters or packaged water as I go, but I don't want to count on it, especially if my goal is to go away from the crowds. I have a water filter from when I went camping that I'm sure I could get up and running again fairly cheap. How much water would you recommend for a desert environment bug out bag? Am I shooting myself in the foot by carrying around all that extra weight instead of other gear? 
Thanks!

Offline endurance

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #348 on: November 29, 2012, 11:23:58 AM »
Today I went out and made an insanely minimalist bug out bag. I got 3 days of food and 2 gallons of water for 20 bucks (I'm on a serious budget) and threw it along with a full pair of clothes in my old hiking backpack. I'm trying to do the best with what I've got, rather than going out and buying stuff, so I'm organizing things that I have lying around like a toothbrush, extra pair of glasses, leatherman, flashlight, lighter, rope, etc etc....
Simply put, I want to be somewhat comfortable for 3 days if I need to drive or hike somewhere. All the other fun stuff will come later, but for now, something is better than nothing. My big question for you all is am I totally overreacting with 2 gallons of water? I live in Southern California, in a place that everyone around me seems to continue to forget is just a well irrigated desert. Most of the water is pumped in over The Grape Vine, and I don't think that should be relied on if I have to bug out.
There are a few reservoirs, and I'm sure I could find water heaters or packaged water as I go, but I don't want to count on it, especially if my goal is to go away from the crowds. I have a water filter from when I went camping that I'm sure I could get up and running again fairly cheap. How much water would you recommend for a desert environment bug out bag? Am I shooting myself in the foot by carrying around all that extra weight instead of other gear? 
Thanks!
As a rule, you pay attention to the rule of threes:
A person can live without air for three minutes
Without shelter/protection from a harsh environment for three hours
Without water for three days
and without food for about three weeks.

There's obvious exceptions to all of those, like cold environments requiring more food to maintain body heat, etc., but it is the foundation of what your priorities should be.  In my opinion, two gallons in Southern California is a good place to start.  Ideally you want one gallon per person per day, but you also have to factor in time of year, outdoor temperatures, and level of activity.  If you have access to other sources along the way that you could quickly purify, you might be able to go lighter.  However, water is one of those essentials of life.  If you go without for even a couple of hours in 90F heat while trying to walk to safety you will find your body's performance dropping off precipitously.

It's always a trade off, which has been discussed countless times in this and other threads whether it is more important to have your pack as light as possible so you can move fast or as complete as possible so you are sure you have everything.  As you gain more experience you'll find some items redundant or that can be replaced with lighter, more effective gear.  In the meantime, make sure you have your bases covered, which is sounds like you do.

I have in my car no less than 5 liters, but I'm surrounded by streams and have both purification tablets and filters available.  For most of my hiking I now use an inline filter on my camelbak so I can simply dip in a stream and get back on the trail (the Sawyer SP121).  Fixing your filter would probably be a wise move, just in case the disaster spans weeks, not days before reliable water service can be restored.  If it's going to cost more than $50 to get it up and running, seriously consider replacing it with an SP121.  With a one million gallon guarantee, it's hard to beat for the money.
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Offline Neilsan

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #349 on: December 17, 2012, 01:42:42 AM »
I have in my car no less than 5 liters, but I'm surrounded by streams and have both purification tablets and filters available.  For most of my hiking I now use an inline filter on my camelbak so I can simply dip in a stream and get back on the trail (the Sawyer SP121).  Fixing your filter would probably be a wise move, just in case the disaster spans weeks, not days before reliable water service can be restored.  If it's going to cost more than $50 to get it up and running, seriously consider replacing it with an SP121.  With a one million gallon guarantee, it's hard to beat for the money.

Thank you so much for the tips! I took it out for a hike the other day, and found a lot of holes, so now I'm going to plug em up. The first hole (literally) was in my cheapo $1 gallon plastic jugs. Those had to go. Also, after listening to a couple of shows and doing a bit of research and planning, it looks like canned soup and veggies are a poor plan for eating. MREs would be ideal, but boy are they expensive. I think an investment in a pocket rocket stove would be a good start, and allow to to give dried veggies and soup bases a try. Sound like I'm on the right track, or should I put money towards peanut butter, jelly and basics?

Most importantly, what do you use to hold your 3 gallons of water? Or, if you had to leave the streams behind, what would you do? I'm looking into HDPE barrels, but mostly for car storage of water and gasoline. Your (and everyones') thoughts?

Thanks!

Offline bcksknr

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Bug Out Water
« Reply #350 on: December 23, 2012, 10:48:33 PM »
Winter presents some interesting challenges for storing water in a vehicle (or BOB kept in a vehicle). Along with the other considerations of gear to put in a pack, one has to think about the change in seasons, at least where I live. Freezing winter temps are to be expected here. Water containers left in a vehicle will freeze and possibly burst. So will many other liquids (liquid filled compass fluid, first aid liquids, chem lights, etc.). In the warm months I keep water in the thick, one gallon containers that medical re-hydration fluids come in. A couple of gallons are in my truck to fill canteens. In the winter, I can't do this. So far the 4 oz. emergency water packets seem to have enough expansion room to not burst when frozen. I suppose that a partially filled container may work as well. The problem is that you then have a block of ice to melt for water, requiring fuel or fire and time. Plus, there is the issue of a block of ice inside a plastic jug that can't go on a fire or stove. So far I just carry the containers in the winter and intend to find and filter water as possible. Hopefully, with a little advance warning, water could be gotten before "bugging out". Freezing temps throws a whole different set of considerations into the BOB thought process! 

Offline endurance

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #351 on: December 24, 2012, 09:18:17 PM »
Thank you so much for the tips! I took it out for a hike the other day, and found a lot of holes, so now I'm going to plug em up. The first hole (literally) was in my cheapo $1 gallon plastic jugs. Those had to go. Also, after listening to a couple of shows and doing a bit of research and planning, it looks like canned soup and veggies are a poor plan for eating. MREs would be ideal, but boy are they expensive. I think an investment in a pocket rocket stove would be a good start, and allow to to give dried veggies and soup bases a try. Sound like I'm on the right track, or should I put money towards peanut butter, jelly and basics?

Most importantly, what do you use to hold your 3 gallons of water? Or, if you had to leave the streams behind, what would you do? I'm looking into HDPE barrels, but mostly for car storage of water and gasoline. Your (and everyones') thoughts?

Thanks!
Personally, I like everything about MREs except the entrees.  I like the crackers with the peanut butter spread, the jelly spread or the cheese spread.  I like the almond and lemon poppy seed bars.  I kinda like the ranger bars (they're actually good if you can drink enough water with them) and I love the potato strings and peanut packets.  I use them all on hikes and backpacking trips all the time because they are reasonably cost competitive with backpacking food.  For hot meals I do ramen, mashed potatoes, mountain house backpacking entrees, oatmeal, and macaroni and cheese with freeze-dried hamburger in it. 

That's all traveling food for me--it's light, easy and quick to prepare, and not prohibitively expensive.  When I hike most of my food is stuff I don't have to stop to eat; bars, fruit snacks, pretzels, and stuff like that.  Clif bars have a decent shelf life and are lightweight and calorie dense.  I also do things like rice crispie treats.

I recommend you stop looking at foods everyone else uses and start looking at foods you like, but meet the criteria of:  lightweight, easy to prepare, packaged for single servings, and good shelf life.  Those are the ideal foods to stock up on.

For water, I'm never more than a two hour hike from water.  I can carry 2-3 hours of water plus enough to prepare dinner in my 3L camelbak.  When I've done extended Grand Canyon hikes where water was much harder to find the MSR Dromedary Bag fits the mission very well.  I've never needed to carry more than two gallons.  The lighter, cheaper route is the Platypus collapsible bottles.  In a pinch they can be repaired with superglue and duct tape, but I have yet to have one spring a leak (with some care).

The dromedary also comes with the option of running a hydration system, filter system or solar shower off of it.  I've never tried any of the above, but it's nice to have options.
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Offline Nicodemus

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #352 on: December 28, 2012, 07:44:09 AM »
I'll second the vote of confidence in the MSR Dromedary Bags. I have two 6 Liter bags and they work great. They're BPA Free food grade polyurethane laminated Cordura. The webbing and grommets make them easy to hang or attach to a pack. They pack fairly small as well.


Offline Medicineball

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #353 on: December 28, 2012, 05:16:34 PM »
I dropped the Dromedary bag thirty feet down a rock face. No damage!

Offline nelson96

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #354 on: December 28, 2012, 10:37:22 PM »
I'll second the vote of confidence in the MSR Dromedary Bags. I have two 6 Liter bags and they work great. They're BPA Free food grade polyurethane laminated Cordura. The webbing and grommets make them easy to hang or attach to a pack. They pack fairly small as well.

I like this one because it's easy to open up and clean (can get your hand all the way to the bottom).  It also has an insulated drinking tube.  Since the bladder is always protected within my pack, I've never seen the need to have it protected with nylon.
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Offline Hootie

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #355 on: December 30, 2012, 08:38:54 AM »
a couple of heavy duty sewing needles and a regular sized spool of 10 lb green kevlar fishing line.  It's exponentially stronger than thread and just a tad thicker.  I've used it to sew just about anything back together and make pouches, and belt pouches.  You blow a seam on your bag or tent, it's going to work to fix.  Cheap thread will fail.  Even can lash sticks together for an A frame etc with it.

It works for fishing too I'm told.

In my BOB mini fishing kit. I always replace the cheap fishing line with Fireline, just for thoses reasons.
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Offline nelson96

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #356 on: December 30, 2012, 11:35:16 AM »
In my BOB mini fishing kit. I always replace the cheap fishing line with Fireline, just for thoses reasons.

Good point. . .  Spiderwire is another good choice.  Even for fishing purposes alone, products like Fireline or Spiderwire are better than the typical monofilament line because monofilament has a memory.  After being stored for long periods of time (especially if it's rolled around something very small in diameter), monofilament will no longer have the ability to be nice and straight for fishing with.
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One hundred thousand generations of people lived and ate as hunter-gatherers, and only two generations have grown up on highly processed fast foods. . .  It's not too late

Offline Connecticut Prepper

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #357 on: December 30, 2012, 04:55:11 PM »
How come almost everyone leaves out a tooth brush?

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #358 on: January 16, 2013, 01:43:48 PM »
Toothbrush is a long term priority, but generally the short term you will be using a bob (1 to 3 days on average, maybe a little longer), the toothbrush isn't critical.   I do have one in my primary bag, (Which weights about 45 lbs), but not in my grab bag. 

At least that's my thinking. 

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Offline endurance

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #359 on: January 17, 2013, 02:39:10 PM »
How come almost everyone leaves out a tooth brush?
I'm a little OCD, so I have a toothbrush in my work kit and my GHB/BOB.  I can't sleep unless I've brushed my teeth first.
"There are things that you don't question when your home always smells like baking bread."  From The Hunger Games

“No nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.”   James Madison