Author Topic: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?  (Read 362285 times)

Offline Solo23

  • Fledgling Prepper
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Karma: 0
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #390 on: June 28, 2013, 05:07:53 PM »
So after reading this I feel like I'm strange for carrying a soil testing kit. The soil down here isn't the best, and if I want to plant, I want to know the best location to!

Offline The Professor

  • Tactical Skittle Assassin
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2748
  • Karma: 383
  • All we have to do is create another universe
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #391 on: June 28, 2013, 09:28:53 PM »
So after reading this I feel like I'm strange for carrying a soil testing kit. The soil down here isn't the best, and if I want to plant, I want to know the best location to!

I may be a little out-of-sorts, here, but I would think that you should know that before you choose a Bug Out Location.

Typically a BOB is meant for those situations where staying where you are poses a greater threat to your life than moving to Point B.  Preferably, you will have Point B (and subsequent locations such as Point C, Point D, etc.) already surveyed and have vetted them for relocation.

I would, of course, also have to ask if you carry enough seeds, etc. in your BOB to permanently support yourself?

The Professor

Offline Solo23

  • Fledgling Prepper
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Karma: 0
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #392 on: June 29, 2013, 09:17:15 PM »
I've tested my A and B location, but I still just want to be sure, and it's extremely light weight, so I don't mind it. As far as seeds, I have enough for about 4 acres of food. my current bug out location is ready to plant, but It's far enough away that it's not realistic to keep a small plot going there.

Offline phil white

  • Fledgling Prepper
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • Karma: 0
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #393 on: August 25, 2013, 02:53:22 PM »
What I like to do, beyond wearing good clothes and foot gear is to have the big three in my pack.
(1) a decent knife
(2) a canteen
(3) a pancho

Offline Sephiroth

  • Senior Survivalist
  • ****
  • Posts: 294
  • Karma: 9
  • Peak Oil !?? Nah....
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #394 on: August 27, 2013, 07:30:48 AM »
So.... this is the Topic for BOB´s  :P

Oh boy, where to start.

First an forthmost. I consider a BOB more of a "get home bag". If e need it, i will need it to either get home or to my "B Location" right ? It is not something i will have to live out of....

First of all, where should i leave my BOB ? Right know, i plan on leaving it in my car, since my plan is to get home in a crisis. And i always leave home in my car. So, that's my plan. Use me EDC carry to get to my BOB which will be in my car, which in turn will be 2km max away from me.

i read somewere, that the first thing one should have is a PLAN ! Although a plan seldom will adequate, it's a statting point. And my plan is simple;

- If the situation has a good chance of normalizing in 72 hours, i bug in at home.

- If the situation is bad enough to pass 72 hours, i relocate to "B" which is 140 KM away.

- if the situation is chaos, relocate to "C" which is 400 KM away. And fend from there.

In any case, my BOB has to get me home, or to my BOV (my car is a good bug out vehicle) so that i can relocate. My problem is what to put in my BOB....

I follow the water/food/shelter/protection path. I'm still in the process of figuring out what to buy. There are good lists here, but i live in São Paulo so I'll have to adapt.

Anybody think I'm going the right way ?

Thanks

Offline The Professor

  • Tactical Skittle Assassin
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2748
  • Karma: 383
  • All we have to do is create another universe
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #395 on: August 29, 2013, 07:25:18 PM »
I've tested my A and B location, but I still just want to be sure, and it's extremely light weight, so I don't mind it. As far as seeds, I have enough for about 4 acres of food. my current bug out location is ready to plant, but It's far enough away that it's not realistic to keep a small plot going there.

And what do you have to eat until the food starts sprouting?

The Professor

Offline Black November

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 627
  • Karma: 72
  • Lifetime MSB & PermaEthos Founding Member
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #396 on: October 04, 2013, 11:58:09 AM »
A great item for a bug out bag that nobody ever thinks about is a solar calculator.

How many ounces of silver is for a running vehicle?
How many days will it take for a family of four (walking 2mph) to travel 215 miles?
If there are 52 apples, and 13 starving people, how many apples does each person get?
 

Offline Alpha Mike

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 805
  • Karma: 30
  • I'm preparing for a lack of imagination.
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #397 on: October 04, 2013, 01:01:31 PM »
If there are 52 apples, and 13 starving people, how many apples does each person get?

This is the time your math teacher told you "One day, algebra will save your life."

Offline RuggedCyclist

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 805
  • Karma: 29
  • Capitalist hippie
    • Boulder Stonecraft
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #398 on: October 09, 2013, 12:01:45 AM »
My bag is more of a get home bag than a bug out bag. I have no set BOL, and I don't have the money to put together a well stocked refugee bag, so I have a small backpack I take with me EVERYWHERE I go. Most of it was born out of necessity for my work, I work for a contractor and I basically get left at a job all day until lunch or quitting time, and if it's in town I go with my bike and I'm on my own all day. It is heavy in bicycling supplies, since my bike is my preferred mode of transportation and I plan on using it when the roads are gridlocked and there's no gas. 
So here is my kit:
>Tools:
Bike multi-tool w/ allen wrenches, screwdriver, wrenches, spoke tools. Comes in a belt pouch w/ tire levers and a tube patch kit.
Leatherman style multi-tool
A full tube patch kit
Mini hand pump
CO2 pump w/ spare CO2 cartridge
Small crescent wrench
Cheapo mini folding garden trowel from Wal Mart
>FAK
Lots of gauze pads. Road burn sucks without gauze.
Medical tape
A few small bandaids
Allergy medicine
Tylenol
Ace bandage
Alcohol wipes
Latex gloves
N95 dust masks (used for work all the time because cement dust is bad for your lungs)
Moleskin
Toilet paper
>Food
A day's worth of granola bars, trail mix, and cookies. Constantly rotated because I eat it at lunch.
Packets of nut butters
A few Clif Bar energy gel packets (non caffeinated) These things really work for biking or for mild hypoglycemia.
2 liter CamelBack full of water plus a 1 liter water bottle. 
>Camping/survival related
5x7 tarp
50 ft of para cord
Emergency blanket
Rain poncho
Waterproof matches
Water purification tablets
Esbit stove w/ fuel tablets
Canteen cup
Tin foil
Flashlight
4 AAA batteries
4 AA batteries
>Clothes (kept to a minimal because it's an edc bag)
Light jacket
Thermal underwear
Thermal socks
Light gloves
More clothes will be added as the weather gets colder.
>Misc.
Potassium supplement tablets in a small bottle for electrolytes
Restaurant salt packets
Hand wipes 
Albuterol inhaler for when certain people's "right to do what they want as long as it does no harm to another" actually involves blowing clouds of poisonous smoke from their coffin nails and giving me an asthma attack and/or re-triggering my exercise induced asthma so I can't get over 18 mph without my lungs shutting off.

I constantly add/remove items in my pack because I don't just eat what I store, I live my preps.     

endurance

  • Guest
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #399 on: October 09, 2013, 12:14:41 PM »
...
>Food
A day's worth of granola bars, trail mix, and cookies. Constantly rotated because I eat it at lunch.
Packets of nut butters
A few Clif Bar energy gel packets (non caffeinated) These things really work for biking or for mild hypoglycemia.
2 liter CamelBack full of water plus a 1 liter water bottle. 
...
Since you're carrying an esbit stove, I'd recommend adding some chicken bullion cubes.  Nothing warms you up during or after a cold, rainy ride better than hot chicken bullion.  Plus, it's loaded with salt, so it's great for replacing electrolytes.  It was my favorite night drink when I was still 24 hour racing.

Offline RuggedCyclist

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 805
  • Karma: 29
  • Capitalist hippie
    • Boulder Stonecraft
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #400 on: October 09, 2013, 01:39:45 PM »
That's a good idea! I might have to replace it with vegetable bullion though, rendered down chicken fat isn't very vegetarian ;) Although if the shit is hitting the fan hard enough I think I would be ok with a little chicken broth.     

endurance

  • Guest
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #401 on: October 09, 2013, 01:55:08 PM »
That's a good idea! I might have to replace it with vegetable bullion though, rendered down chicken fat isn't very vegetarian ;) Although if the shit is hitting the fan hard enough I think I would be ok with a little chicken broth.   
Fair enough.  I just know that a hot, salty drink on a cold ride is great, which is why I always pack a 1 pint thermos on winter rides.

Offline allofthemonkeys

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 374
  • Karma: 13
    • Dutch Oven A Day
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #402 on: October 10, 2013, 05:05:29 PM »
Diapers.  I have a kid who needs them and the idea is my wife carries some, I carry some and if one of us has the little one then we can change them if we need to.  If we are together then we have more diapers.  I made a Baby BOB but it is a really small bag and ran out of room for the diapers after food.

Offline zarathustra19

  • Fledgling Prepper
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Karma: 0
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #403 on: October 10, 2013, 07:40:09 PM »
Hi all,

This is obviously my first post, but I've been lurking around for a while and thought I'd share what I've currently got in my BOB.

First off, my philosophy doesn't concentrate on the get home bag portion of prepping just yet, as I work about five minutes from my house and take my BOB with me when I go out of town.  I plan on building one of those when the time presents itself (i.e. when I get a job outside my comfortable walking range).  In any case, my BOB is focused around getting out of town alone or with family and friends, so if you see a lot of redundancy, there is a theoretical method to my madness.  On to the list, which I've copied from my printed inventory:

Pack Contents:
Food:
1.    MRE crackers (2) – 180 cal. each
2.    MRE banana choc. muffin top – 260 cal.
3.    MRE wheat snack bread (2) – 180 cal. each
4.    MRE condiment kit (sugar, hot sauce, cracker, etc)
5.    MRE chemical food heater
6.    Cinnamon raisin granola bar (6) – 140 cal. each
7.    Cranberry pomegranate granola bar (10) 130 cal. each
8.    Beef stock packet (3)
9.    Chicken stock packet (3)
Calorie count: 3120

Fishing Supplies:
10.    Approx. 40 hooks, sizes 10-6
11.    Sinkers (4) – split shot
12.     5-10 yds 4lb line – bundle
13.    10 yds 25lb line – bundle
14.    210 yds 25lb line – spool
         Note: stored in a repurposed skoal tin

Emergency Pocket Kit:
15.   Snare wire
16.   Tinder bundle
17.   Split bandages (2)
18.   4”x11” foil sheet (moldable in a pinch to boil water)
19.   12’ thin cord (not 550, came with Les Stroud knife)
20.   Razor blade
21.   15 safety matches w/ strike pads
     Note: this is a repurposed skoal tin which I carry at all times, but which I toss into my bag while hiking.

Plastic Bag 1:
22.    Anti-diarrheal pills + 2 tylenol – pill bottle
23.    Loratadine allergy meds + 4 tylenol – pill bottle
24.    Slotted cleaning end
25.    9mm brush
26.   .22 brush
27.    Emergency blanket (foil, yes)
28.   Strike on box matches – ½ box
29.   Waterproof matches (3 box)
30.   Compass
31.   Fingernail clippers
32.   Small roll duct tape
33.   Whistle
34.   Plastic bag
35.   8”x11” foil sheet (as noted before for boiling, or wind break for stove
36.   Pens (2)
37.   Pencil
38.   wire saw

Plastic Bag 2:
39.   Pocket knife (3)*
40.   Eyeglass repair kit
41.    Pen
42.   Razor knife
43.   Knife sharpener
44.   Turkey call (not necessarily needed, but light and small)
45.   Electrical tape
46.     Plastic tubing
47.   Anti-fungal cream (prescription strength)

Plastic Bag 3:
48.    Medium adhesive bandages (6)
49.    Large adhesive bandage
50.    Flex bandage (3)
51.    Surgical blade
52.    Magnesium fire starter
53.    Striker
54.    Tinder (cardboard)
55.    Waterproof bag
56.    Emergency whistle
57.    Waterproof matches (1 box)
58.    Compass

Loose Items:
59.    Knife – Gerber big rock camp knife
60.    Survival knife (w/ whistle, flashlight, and fire striker)
61.    Boot knife
62.    4" Copper tubing (don't know why, but might come in handy)
63.    Small multi-tool
64.    Camp stove
65.    Fuel Canister
66.    Shorts (1 pair)
67.    Jeans (1 pair)
68.    Socks (2 pair)
69.    Underwear (2 pair)
70.    Shirts (2)
71.    Gloves (1 pair)
72.    Rubber band ball
73.    State map
74.    Writing paper
75.    Spare glasses

Carry On-Person
76.   Fire striker
77.   Bottle opener
78.   Standard screwdriver keychain
79.   Swiss army knife
80.   Gerber pocket knife
81.   Suspension Multi-tool
82.   Ruger SR-9
83.   100 rounds 9mm
84.   Hat (baseball or sun)
85.   .22 rifle (see below)
86.   100 rounds .22LR

OSK (Oh S*** Kit - .22 rifle)
87.    10 rounds .22LR
88.    Tinder
89.    Waterproof matches (1 box)
90.    Hand sanitizer (alcohol based, accelerant)

Carry if possible:*
91. 12ga Shotgun
92.   25 rounds shotgun ammunition

Still Needed:
1.    Water filter – Katadyn Hiker
2.    Sleeping Bag – 30 degree
3.    Tent – 1 Person
4.    Sleeping bag liner (fleece)
5.    Tent pegs
6.    Water purification tabs
7.    Steel canteen/cup
8.    Multi-vitamin/additional meds
9.    Anti-biotics
10.    Flashlight
11.   Radio (2 way)
12.   Radio (weather/AM/FM)
13.   Needle and thread

* - signifies the possibility of outfitting fellow travelers

Now, I realize I've neglected some pretty important items, but I plan to get all of the things on my "still needed" list in the next few months, as budget allows.  My pack is actually pretty light, as most of my inventory is comprised of small items which I have found myself needing or see practical use for in the future.  I realize that bugging out should be estimated to last about 72 hours, but I like to plan for worst case if possible.  Also, I have taken this pack on ten mile hikes with no fatigue noticed from the extra weight, though I had to leave the firearms behind due to regulations in the state and federal parks I like to frequent.

Any additions or criticism of my contents is welcome.

Edit: forgot to mention the OSK.  My "oh s*** kit" is stored inside the hollow butt-stock of my .22, so even if I happen to lose everything else (unlikely, but possible), I'll still have ammo and a way to make fire relatively easily.



« Last Edit: October 10, 2013, 07:56:13 PM by zarathustra19 »

Offline OutWestTX

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 873
  • Karma: 41
  • Long time prepper
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #404 on: October 10, 2013, 08:21:49 PM »
I don't have a BOB because I live at my bug out, but I have a Get-Home Bag.  It weighs 15# because I know my limitations and I know I can't carry more than 15# for the 40 miles to get home from work.  People who think they are going to carry 50# of gear without actually doing it are not going to make it.

My bag contains:
my leatherman
paracord
tarp
extra socks
bandana
chapstick
a lighter
a LifeStraw
small first aid kit
two bottles of water
a couple MREs

I have practiced walking 10 miles with it a couple of times to make sure everything works and I can carry the weight.  I already have a weapon and flashlight for work so those aren't included, but would be with me.

Offline RuggedCyclist

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 805
  • Karma: 29
  • Capitalist hippie
    • Boulder Stonecraft
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #405 on: October 10, 2013, 09:31:26 PM »
@OutWestTX, if you work 40 miles from home, have you considered keeping a folding bicycle in your vehicle with your bugout gear? It could be an option depending on how much room you have in your vehicle and would cut your travel time down by a LOT if driving isn't an option. Also, how long could you comfortably last on two MREs? You never know what might go wrong when you're bugging out. I'd throw some water purification tablets in there too, just because they're cheap and light and could make a world of difference.   

Offline The Professor

  • Tactical Skittle Assassin
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2748
  • Karma: 383
  • All we have to do is create another universe
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #406 on: October 10, 2013, 10:22:03 PM »
A few comments, worth exactly what you paid for them:


Also sprach Zarathusthra:

Hi all,

This is obviously my first post, but I've been lurking around for a while and thought I'd share what I've currently got in my BOB.

First off, my philosophy doesn't concentrate on the get home bag portion of prepping just yet, as I work about five minutes from my house and take my BOB with me when I go out of town.  I plan on building one of those when the time presents itself (i.e. when I get a job outside my comfortable walking range).  In any case, my BOB is focused around getting out of town alone or with family and friends, so if you see a lot of redundancy, there is a theoretical method to my madness.  On to the list, which I've copied from my printed inventory:

Pack Contents:
Food:
1.    MRE crackers (2) – 180 cal. each
2.    MRE banana choc. muffin top – 260 cal.
3.    MRE wheat snack bread (2) – 180 cal. each
4.    MRE condiment kit (sugar, hot sauce, cracker, etc)
5.    MRE chemical food heater
6.    Cinnamon raisin granola bar (6) – 140 cal. each
7.    Cranberry pomegranate granola bar (10) 130 cal. each
8.    Beef stock packet (3)
9.    Chicken stock packet (3)
Calorie count: 3120

The first question I'd ask is how far and how long do you intend to bug out?

The food you have is loaded with sugar and, honestly, won't provide you much sustenance for a day, if you are walking hard and fast (and carrying something).  You'll get a quick energy boost, but most of it is glorified candy and you'll burn through those simple carbs quickly.

I recommend, as a rule, 2500 - 3000 calories per day that provide you with a more balanced 40/40/20 combination of nutrients (Carbs/Proteins/Fats) with a concentration on complex carbs, not simple sugars.

Even two, full MRE's will give you a better mix than what you have here.  I might suggest bolstering that with a few other options.  Even adding three,  1-qt nalgene containers (one filled with mashed potato flakes, one with couscous or pasta stars and one filled with instant rice, instant barley or another, similar, staple) would stretch out your foodstuffs.

Later, you also indicate you have a "camp stove" and fuel canister.  Unless you're in a very monsoon-like area, you may want to consider lightening your summer-through-fall load by resorting to a debris stove such as an esbit, or similar.  Using twigs, grass, and other detritus that you can scavenge as you walk would lighten your load a bit.

Quote

Fishing Supplies:
10.    Approx. 40 hooks, sizes 10-6
11.    Sinkers (4) – split shot
12.     5-10 yds 4lb line – bundle
13.    10 yds 25lb line – bundle
14.    210 yds 25lb line – spool
         Note: stored in a repurposed skoal tin

Referring back to Question #1: How long/far do you expect to bug out?  A fishing kit IS a small, relatively lightweight addition to a kit, but it's predicated upon the concept of waiting (possibly a long time) for you to catch your food and then the necessary prep time.  I might suggest including more food and not expecting to rely upon catching your own, unless you're walking a LOOONG distance.

Quote
Emergency Pocket Kit:
15.   Snare wire
16.   Tinder bundle
17.   Split bandages (2)
18.   4”x11” foil sheet (moldable in a pinch to boil water)
19.   12’ thin cord (not 550, came with Les Stroud knife)
20.   Razor blade
21.   15 safety matches w/ strike pads
     Note: this is a repurposed skoal tin which I carry at all times, but which I toss into my bag while hiking.

#15: Indicates you are expecting to stay in one place for a while. Do you currently trap?
#18: I might suggest that you either add an aluminum camper's pot or get the aluminum canteen cup referred to in #7 on your "Still Needed List.

#19: You'll want more.  Either 550 cord or Decoy Line (thinner than 550).

#21: Consider adding an inexpensive Bic butane lighter or two or a Zippo Lighter. 

Quote
Plastic Bag 1

24.    Slotted cleaning end
25.    9mm brush
26.   .22 brush


Didn't see any reference to a cleaning rod for either the handgun or rifle and nothing in the way of a borebrush or swab for the shotgun.  Also,  no lube or cleaner for any of it.

Quote
Plastic Bag 2:
39.   Pocket knife (3)*
40.   Eyeglass repair kit
41.    Pen
42.   Razor knife
43.   Knife sharpener
44.   Turkey call (not necessarily needed, but light and small)
45.   Electrical tape
46.     Plastic tubing
47.   Anti-fungal cream (prescription strength)

Three pocket knives, a razor, a "razor knife," a surgical blade (below), two sheath knives (Gerber Big Rock Camp Knife and a "Survival Knife"), a boot knife, a Swiss Army Knife, a fourth pocket knife (Gerber), AND a multi-tool!?!?

Respectfully, I might suggest that you lose all but three of them: one of the sheath knives, the Multi-Tool and one of the pocket knives, preferably a locking folder.

#41: An additional Pen?  - I might suggest getting a decent one, perhaps one of the lesser expensive Space Pens and a mechanical pencil (a 0.9mm with it's thicker lead won't tear through wet or flimsy paper)

Quote
Loose Items:
59.    Knife – Gerber big rock camp knife
60.    Survival knife (w/ whistle, flashlight, and fire striker)
61.    Boot knife
62.    4" Copper tubing (don't know why, but might come in handy)
63.    Small multi-tool
64.    Camp stove
65.    Fuel Canister
66.    Shorts (1 pair)
67.    Jeans (1 pair)
68.    Socks (2 pair)
69.    Underwear (2 pair)
70.    Shirts (2)
71.    Gloves (1 pair)
72.    Rubber band ball
73.    State map
74.    Writing paper
75.    Spare glasses


My issues with #59, #60, #61 and #63, #80, #81 and #82 have already been addressed.

Quote

Still Needed:
1.    Water filter – Katadyn Hiker
2.    Sleeping Bag – 30 degree
3.    Tent – 1 Person
4.    Sleeping bag liner (fleece)
5.    Tent pegs
6.    Water purification tabs
7.    Steel canteen/cup
8.    Multi-vitamin/additional meds
9.    Anti-biotics
10.    Flashlight
11.   Radio (2 way)
12.   Radio (weather/AM/FM)
13.   Needle and thread


The water filter should be your first priority.  I also did not see any ways to carry water on your list. 

One other suggestion would be to knock out both #11 and #12 in one felled swoop by purchasing one of the inexpensive amateur radios that can be modified to receive AM and FM bands.  Getting a VHF transceiver would cover the weather band anywhere in the US.

You'll also need additional batteries.  I might also suggest standardizing your batteries so that all your powered items use the same size.

I would also suggest more medical items that will address the needs of walking long distances.  A few things such as moleskin, tincture of benzoin, tape such as Elastikon or Kinesio-Tex to prevent blisters and hotspots on your feet as you walk.

Just some suggestions, hope they help.

The Professor

Offline RuggedCyclist

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 805
  • Karma: 29
  • Capitalist hippie
    • Boulder Stonecraft
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #407 on: October 11, 2013, 12:36:23 AM »
I think he has like 5 knives is so he can outfit his family and friends a little bit if need be.
I think a lot of people's bug out bags would be improved greatly if they read stories about the Appalachian Trail and how in some areas the trail is littered with "camping gear" that people decide is too heavy to be worth the weight. EDCing a backpack full of stuff on my bike to work every day has certainly taught me the value in weight reduction in your kits and I've got it streamlined to a fair minimum of what I need.

I think one of the best things you can do is try your kits out and see what works for you.

Offline OutWestTX

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 873
  • Karma: 41
  • Long time prepper
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #408 on: October 11, 2013, 02:43:17 AM »
@OutWestTX, if you work 40 miles from home, have you considered keeping a folding bicycle in your vehicle with your bugout gear? It could be an option depending on how much room you have in your vehicle and would cut your travel time down by a LOT if driving isn't an option. Also, how long could you comfortably last on two MREs? You never know what might go wrong when you're bugging out. I'd throw some water purification tablets in there too, just because they're cheap and light and could make a world of difference.   

I already keep a bicycle in the back of my truck.  But I keep my Get-Home Bag small in case I have to walk.  I don't want to depend on the bike.  I'm not bugging out, I'm walking home which is why I don't carry more than two MREs.  I carry the LifeStraw so that I don't have to have the water purification tablets.  I periodically walk with my bag to test the weight.  The furthest I went in one day so far was 28 miles.  My bag is to get me home, not live out of. 

The important thing is to get out there and practice.  Most people I know have never walked 28 miles in one day.  You need to experience what you are capable of.  People need to get out there and test their preps.

Offline ncjeeper

  • Most Noble Order of the Garter Snake
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4595
  • Karma: 124
  • Oooops!
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #409 on: October 11, 2013, 10:02:34 AM »
The important thing is to get out there and practice. People need to get out there and test their preps.
Yep. We talk about that all the time and members here (including myself) have done dry runs and posted what worked and what needed to be changed.

Offline Knecht

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1156
  • Karma: 50
  • Czech emissary at TSP forum
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #410 on: October 22, 2013, 05:31:32 AM »
I guess my BOB concept is a little different. I actualy don't have a BOB! That's right. I carry some stuff all the time and the rest can be packed quickly. Let's see: I have an EDC "survival capsule" on me all the time (as seen in the EDC thread) and I carry couple more things in my pockets and belt (knives, Glock27, flashlight, extra magazine, mini-straightrazor folder (CountyComm) and such.
I have some more stuff in my everyday bag (Maxpedition Active Shooter's bag) - multitool and bit-kit (Leatherman Wave), another flashlight, extra batteries, another knife or two, Glock22, extra mags, MRE spoon, compressed bandage, first aid kit (including a flask of high-volume alcohol and a thin izothermic foil blanket), de-freezer capsule (ment for car locks, but being almost pure alcohol, it's a great firestarter, degreaser, EtcEtc..), windproof matches, lighter...

So that was my EDC stuff. Now let's see the rest. Even if I had a classic BOB, I'd still have to pack stuff like food, sleeping gear, clothes and such. So what's the point? My apartment is quite small, so I know well where all my things are. Guns and ammo are in a gunsafe. Knives are mostly in a big drawer. Another big drawer holds my small outdoor/survival equipment, such as purification tablets, space blankets, canteens, paracord spools, packed army bandages and such.
My tools are in a toolbox or at the workbench. Long-term supplies are stored in a kitchen closet.
My backpack is under bed and has a medic pouch attached to it, as well as a short 12" machete. There's an army poncho in on of it's pockets, as well as wool socks, cap, gloves and shemag. Also have couple large garbage bags in there (precious survival item), waterproof packed matches, some cord and such. My big survival kit also lives in one pocket.
So, the backpack itself is sort of survival set by itself, with nothing else added.
Now comes a nylon molle type shoulder bag that's the closest thing to BOB in my possession. But no, it's not the regular kit most people have. My bag is rather a set of untouchable supplies that I'd pack anyway, yet having them in extra bag means two things: 1) I know exactly where they are 2) I don't use them up in non-emergency situations. These are items such as duct tape, electro tape, spool of bind wire, some more garbage bags, isothermic foils, couple nails, backup knives (CS Mini Hunter and CS War Head - would make a nice spear if needed), some paracord, big pack of matches, steel and flint, kevlar sewing thread...guess you get the idea.
Well, the general idea comes now: how fast can an emergency situation happen in my area? Which leads to how quickly do I need to pack. Flood is known of days ago. Wildfires don't happen here, not dry enough. No earthquakes in this part of the world. No sea-related danger as we're inland country. No known active vulcanos. Not much mood for a large scale riots or civil war - and if it was, it's not gonna happen just overnight. The same for enemy invasion. I live in rather large city, yet on it's edge, so I can leave it quickly, without being too bothered by possible traffic jams. My car is 4x4 RAV4, so in emergency I can drive off-road easily. I don't have kids and my lady is like-minded so she won't slow me down at all, she's rather gonna load the mags while I pack the other stuff. She knows local land as she hiked here a lot, while I know very well the target area are where we would be heading. She can shoot all guns we have and she's probably better than me with a long blade (I'm better with knife and axe). Both of us are used to spend time outdoors with little gear, sleeping under tarp, cooking on fire, foraging edible mushrooms and berries, we both have some fishing experience, though none of us really enjoys fishing. None of us is too spoiled by modern comfort, either, which means we don't need to pack too much stuff.
With all of that in mind, I really don't need a classic BOB much. I work 15-20 minutes walk from my place. I can leave work and be on road/on foot in much less than hour. Having my EDC on me, I'm already well equipped in fact. When I come home, I'll take the backpack and fill it with spare clothes, food, ammo and other necessary stuff. I grab the non-BOB bag and pack it in as well, knowing I have all necessary handy materials on me. Depending on whether we go by car or foot and also on the current season, I'll pack either just basic or extended or reduced amount of tools and camping stuff (axe, speeping pad, sleeping bag, blankets, tarp....). If we go by car, I can throw couple ammo crates into the trunk. If on foot, each of us takes couple mags and some small amount of ammo in the pack. We have guns that can be easily carried concealed - aside of pistols it's AKSU74, 12"Fabarm stock-less shotgun, vz.61, shortened vz.58 with folding stock, KPOS2 PDW set for Glock  - all of that can be hidden in a small handbag, some sportsware pouch or just under coat easily - if the emergency situation would  be serious enough to be so armed, yet not enough to open carry them.

Well, that's about my BOB plans, based on my local situation.

Offline The Professor

  • Tactical Skittle Assassin
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2748
  • Karma: 383
  • All we have to do is create another universe
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #411 on: October 22, 2013, 12:59:12 PM »
I guess my BOB concept is a little different. I actualy don't have a BOB! That's right.  I carry some stuff all the time and the rest can be packed quickly.

. . .snip. . .

So that was my EDC stuff. Now let's see the rest. Even if I had a classic BOB, I'd still have to pack stuff like food, sleeping gear, clothes and such. So what's the point? My apartment is quite small, so I know well where all my things are.

. . .snip. . .

Well, the general idea comes now: how fast can an emergency situation happen in my area? Which leads to how quickly do I need to pack. Flood is known of days ago. Wildfires don't happen here, not dry enough. No earthquakes in this part of the world. No sea-related danger as we're inland country. No known active vulcanos. Not much mood for a large scale riots or civil war - and if it was, it's not gonna happen just overnight.

With all of that in mind, I really don't need a classic BOB much. I work 15-20 minutes walk from my place. I can leave work and be on road/on foot in much less than hour. Having my EDC on me, I'm already well equipped in fact. When I come home, I'll take the backpack and fill it with spare clothes, food, ammo and other necessary stuff.

. . .snip. . .

Well, that's about my BOB plans, based on my local situation.


And if you wake up one night discovering your apartment building on fire, smoke rolling in under the door and the knob too hot to touch?

How long will it take you get your stuff together?

I'm sure Renter's Insurance will cover it all, but I don't want to explain all my kit contents to the insurance company, assuming they'll accept anything without receipts.

The idea of a BOB is for quick egress.  As an example, if my house caught on fire while I'm taking a shower, I can be out the door/window with my kit in under a minute.

I'll at least have the basics to survive if my house burns to the ground.  I may not have to sleep under a tarp in the back yard, but I'll have a set of clothes, a way to defend myself, food for a while and my personal documents all together in one place.

And while riots may not happen in a blink of an eye (they do, btw), what happens if you get home and find out the neo-Nazis have, once again, decided to eradicate some Roma people that they think are in your area?  Those Molotov Cocktails can't tell the difference between good and bad, involved and uninvolved.

To each his own.

The Professor

<<edited for spelling errors>>
« Last Edit: October 22, 2013, 01:04:43 PM by The Professor »

Offline Knecht

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1156
  • Karma: 50
  • Czech emissary at TSP forum
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #412 on: October 23, 2013, 01:33:49 AM »
Don't want to spam the thread any further with BOB-unrelated stuff, so just briefly: Neonazis? Don't know what kind of news do you read/watch, but there's little neonazi danger here. EDITED BY MODERATOR Any real fights are highly rare though, don't know what the foreign media say about it. And I doubt molotovs can be thrown up to 10th floor, if any riots start. Plus it's not likely to happen in this part of the city, there are better places to do so and everyone knows them... The house is an old commie era concrete block of flats, those don't burn very well (although the smoke can still kill you inside, so evacuation is a good idea), so if a fire started elsewhere than my apartment, I'm not likely to lose my possessions (sure, they may get damaged by firefighting and such). Also, even if the house burned to the ground and fell apart, we've got our families to stay with and help us, just like we would help them. So it's not like I would stand in front of the burning house, having nowhere to go. No need for a bag with water filter, matches and hobo stove at that moment (even if I needed a survival kit, I have some in my car). The apartment is not mine, it's rented - no harm done to me. I don't keep much cash money there and have little real valuables, aside of guns. My laptop isn't worth much and the data is backuped elsewhere. So, grabbing my EDC bag is quite enough (ID, driving license, gun license, credit card, some cash, car keys plus all the stuff I described above, including medic kit, couple knives and a pistol with ammo). If I have time to open the safe and sling my rifles on me, then good. If not, I just run to the stairs with wet bandana on my face... can't do much more. Got a gasmask, but those aren't actualy much helpful in fire.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2013, 12:33:17 PM by Mr. Bill »

Offline Mr. Bill

  • Like a hot cocoa mojito
  • Administrator
  • Ultimate Survival Veteran
  • *******
  • Posts: 15223
  • Karma: 1873
  • Trained Attack Sheepdog/Troll hunter
    • Website Maintenance and Online Presence Management by Mr. Bill
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #413 on: October 24, 2013, 12:40:04 PM »
MODERATOR NOTE:

A few things that are unacceptable on TSP Forum:
  • Referring to any ethnic group as "vermin" (regardless of whether you share that opinion yourself and regardless of where you live).
  • Public accusations against another forum member.
  • Going way, way off topic.

Thread has been cleaned up.  Back to bug-out bags, please.

edit: archer
« Last Edit: October 24, 2013, 05:46:29 PM by Archer »

Offline Ms. Albatross

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1746
  • Karma: 138
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #414 on: December 27, 2013, 05:53:27 PM »
Most people who have children also had a BOB for their kids.  Many parents pack items to keep their kids occupied/entertained.  Things like coloring books and crayons, packs of cards, MadLibs, etc.  My daughter just introduced me to something new that was a lot of fun for both kids and adults.  It was Bananagrams.

It's a Scrabble-like game without a board.  The letters tiles come in a banana-shaped zippered pouch.  It is fairly small and could be played anywhere.

Here's a link to it on Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Bananagrams-BAN001/dp/1932188126/ref=pd_bxgy_t_text_z



The same company also makes Appleletters which comes in an apple-shaped pouch and Pairsinpears, which, surprise, comes in a pear shaped pouch.

I'll bet you could make your own if you came across some cheap Scrabble games at garage sale.  Just salvage all the letters and find/make a zippered pouch.  There are instructions on the internet on how to play the game.

Offline Docwatmo

  • May Ignite Spontaneously
  • Administrator
  • Survival Veteran
  • *******
  • Posts: 8829
  • Karma: 267
  • The Prepper Rising from the Ashes
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #415 on: December 30, 2013, 08:25:26 AM »
yep, we have that game at home, The bag tore because we used it so much and it's all in a ziplock bag now.  It is a GREAT game!!

Offline Badhog

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 593
  • Karma: 22
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #416 on: January 01, 2014, 06:26:45 PM »
One thing I've decided as I'm making my BOB is anything I cut out is going into a large duffel bag I keep next to it. The bag will have extra food, water, and clothing in the event I'm able to take a vehicle.

Offline Greekman

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4003
  • Karma: 206
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #417 on: January 03, 2014, 03:13:13 PM »
good job... I did something similar with setting a support bag.

endurance

  • Guest
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #418 on: January 03, 2014, 03:58:45 PM »
I've done similar, too.  I have one bag that's just my extreme cold weather gear.  It pays just to keep stuff organized and ready to go. 

Offline OutWestTX

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 873
  • Karma: 41
  • Long time prepper
Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #419 on: January 04, 2014, 02:01:35 AM »
What does everyone do about prescriptions in their BOB?  Since my bag is to get home, I don't keep much in my bag.  Just wondering what others do.