Author Topic: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?  (Read 339221 times)

Offline flagtag

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #30 on: January 25, 2009, 12:29:38 PM »
I just glanced through the list, but I didn't see any extra zip lock bags (to use when items are opened - like the wet ones) to keep things dry or to keep wet things from drying out. Just roll up, they won't take up much room. Also can be used to put wet/dirty clothing in.  (Lg & sm sizes)
Did I miss them? 

Offline Beetle

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #31 on: January 25, 2009, 02:11:44 PM »
   Sorry, I actually packed items in ziplock bags before I put them in the pack and didn't take a picture of it. I was actually going to repack it and use the seal a meal on stuff like the matches. The wet ones reseal on their own to stay moist. Soon I will pack my own Bug out bag, but I have been in the process of gathering some items.

Offline flagtag

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #32 on: January 25, 2009, 02:46:54 PM »
The reason I mentioned the Wet Ones was that I used to keep some in my truck and they either leaked or dried out until I put them in the zip lock.  I'm sure the temps had something to do with it.

Da Fat Kid

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #33 on: February 14, 2009, 08:35:09 PM »
Bailey Well I know this post is a little old but hey being new here I am trying to catch up! Good lookin pack  (forgive me here folks)  BUT keep in mind that since you are packin fer yer bride, THE LADIES have some different needs than us fellers do if ya know what I mean ;) :-[ Maybe ya got it covered but just not mentioned.  Guys please keep this in mind if packing for others.
Also you might want to check out the Leatherman Monarch 500 light. Trust me you will never go back to a mini mag!  DFK
« Last Edit: February 14, 2009, 08:37:41 PM by Da Fat Kid »

Offline The Professor

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #34 on: February 15, 2009, 03:07:02 AM »
Okay, I'm bored tonight and figured I'd respond.

However, before I go into an extremely lengthy response, I do want to make a few caveats and explanations.

I never have liked the term "Bug-Out Bag."  It presupposes that such an assortment of equipment and supplies will only be used during an evacuation.

A long time ago, I coined the term "Personal Emergency Resource Kit (or PERK)."  Why?  Because I wholeheartedly believe that this small kit is the FIRST and MOST IMPORTANT assembly of stuff anyone interested in preparedness should put together.

The motivation behind a PERK is not as a collection of stuff to run away, but to survive under any situation.   It is arranged in such a matter as to be able to move it from where you are to where you want to go, if that move results in a greater chance of survival.  You do not have to be a subscriber to the "run away" mindset to take advantage of a PERK.  It is the most basic assembly of survival items you should ever have.  Each and every member of a family should have one of these kits.  From the youngest to the oldest, a PERK should be assembled and ready to go. . .or stay.  All of the items contained in a PERK can be used if you stay at home, are forced to leave by car, or can be carried on foot.

Now, a PERK has certain requirements:

A PERK must provide you with total support of all your needs for 24 hours, while giving you the tools and equipment to provide for yourself almost indefinitely (this is not a WELFARE kit, you are expected to contribute time and effort to your own support).

Personally, my own requirements are as such :

First, a PERK must provide you with 24 hours' supply of water, while providing you with AT LEAST 2 weeks' worth of the ability to procure and filter potable water.

Second,  a PERK must provide you with a MINIMUM of 1 week's worth of food and provide you with the ability to obtain and prepare food indefinitely.

Third, a PERK must provide you with minimal shelter, suitable for your average foreseeable weather conditions and provide you with the tools to make more durable, or even semi-permanent/permanent shelter.

Finally, the entire package must be man- (or woman-) portable under the worst conditions.  If I can take my truck, you can bet your bottom dollar that I will. But, if I am forced to leave my home, then my PERK will be taken with me.

Now, on to the contents:

Water :

1-gallon water in containers seperate from PERK for easy rotation
2 or 3 durable water containers (canteens, water bladders) for use in rough conditions
6 bottles Polar Pur Iodine tablets
1 Mechanical water filter w/ spare filter

Food:

6 MRE's, removed from their packaging and put into Slide-Lock bags. This should cover me for 3 days.
1- 1qt Nalgene container with Minute Rice
1 - 1qt Nalgene container with Acine di Pepe Pasta
1 - 1qt Nalgene container with Idaho REAL Mashed Potatoes (this exact brand name)
1 - bag or bottle with various flavorings (Beef, vegetable, pork or chicken bouillion.  various dried soups, etc.).

Cooking Utensils :
1 - Stainless steel cup or military canteen cup (camper's pot will suffice)
1 - Stainless spoon
1 - Stainless fork
1 - Small cleaning kit (Brillo pad, small sponge, tiny bottle of dishsoap)
1 - Esbit Stove or "Tommy Cooker" with spare solid fuel tabs/blocks

Shelter :
1 - Heavy Duty Space Blanket (not the flimsy one)
1 - Ecotat Survival Shelter
4 - Tent pegs appropriate for your environment (spikes if good, or rocky soil, stakes or "flats" if sandy)
4 - 18-24" Bungee cords
1 - Hammock
1 - Sleeping Bag appropriate for climate

Clothing :
(Note : 1 set should be inside PERK, 2nd should be in small bag outside PERK)
2 - Complete sets of DURABLE clothing appropriate for climate.
    * Each set consists of :
      1- Pair Pants
      1- Long Sleeve Shirt
      1- T-shirt
      1- Pr. Sliding shorts
      4- Pr. Socks
      1- Pr good quality boots.
      1- Pr. Quality Leather Gloves
      1- Hat
      1- Pr. Inexpensive, UV-tinted Safety Glasses

Hygiene :
1 - Hand-sized towel
1 - Washcloth
2 - Bars, Unscented soap (Do NOT use scented)
1 - Bar, shaving soap
1 - Razor with additional heads
1 - "Unbreakable" mirror
1 - Toothbrush
1 - Tube, Toothpaste
1 - Microfiber towel (buy a Sham-Wow and make Finch happy)
1 - Roll, Floss
1 - Pr. Tweezers

For those of you with Cold Weather concerns, add in :
1 - Cold Weather Jacket
1 - Cold Weather Pants
2 - Pr. Cold Weather Gloves
1 - Pr. Cold Weather Boots
1 - Cold Weather Hat (Wool cap, or equivalent)
2 - Sets Thermal underwear (1 set goes in small duffel bag. . .explained later).

Tools :

1 - Cold Steel "Spetsnaz" shovel
1 - Busse Steelheart sheath knife with Sheath & Sharpening Stone
1 - Leatherman Wave Tool
1 - Gransfors Bruks Small forest axe (19" hickory handle, 3 1/4" face and 1 1/2 lb head)

First Aid Kit
2 - Triangular Bandages
1 - Box Assorted Bandaids (Preferably waterproof and flexible)
8 - 4" x 4" Gauze Pads
1 - Magnifying Glass (A plastic Fresnel Lens is perfect)
10 - Safety Pins
1 - Roll of Moleskin
1 - Bottle Tylenol (50 count)
1 - Bottle Multi-Vitamins (50 Count)
1 - Thermometer
2 - 2" x 6' Ace Bandages
2 - Rolls, Surgical Tape
8 -  Sutures, General Purpose
1 - Tube, Triple Antibiotic cream
1 - Bottle, Pepto-Bismol Tablets
1 - SAM Splint
1 - Lip Balm
3 - Pr, Latex Gloves
1 - Pr. EMT Shears
10 - Butterfly Closures
5 - Ammonia Inhalants
10 - Sudafed (or equivalent)
10 - Cough Suppressant
10 - Tablets, Anti-Diarrheal
10 - Tablets, Laxative

Misc.
1 - MiniMag Flashlight (If you can find a red lens cover, get it)
100' - 550 cord
1 - Gerber StrikeForce fire starter
100 - Waterproof matches
1 - 8-hour candle
1 - Set of maps of your area (Go to camping store and buy MapSaf to waterproof them (or use Thompsons Water Seal))
1 - Luminous dial Military Compass
1 - Sewing Kit, (spare buttons, heavy duty needles and thread, patching material)
1 - Fishing Kit in 35mm film cannister (monofilament line, hooks, small sinkers, flies, spoons/spinners)
1 - Tube Sunblock
2 - Bottles Bug repellent (use only manual pump-type, not pressurized)
1 - Wallet with extra Identification
5 - Large Trash bags, Industrial-grade (the heaviest-duty you can find).
2 - Rolls, Quarters
$100 in cash, small bills preferred.

All of this goes into an appropriately-sized internal frame backpack.  The internal frame pack allows you to rest the kit comfortably on your back, keeping both hands free.  It pulls the equipment close to your back and reduces the possibility of the load shifting while you are moving around . . .perhaps while attempting to negotiate dangerous rubble.

Finally, you should sit down and make up a small notebook with all the names, addresses and telephone numbers (home, work, cellphone, fax, etc.) of everyone you know both in, and out of, your area.  You should include EVERYONE, including your bank manager, insurance agent, the toll-free number for your water, electricity, phone, and all other services.  One thing you can do is enter this into your favorite Word Processing program and print it out on that Waterproof outdoor paper, punch holes in it and put it in a small binder. Remember to get them notarized, especially important papers and identity documentation and put in a rugged, waterproof pouch.

I do have two arrangements for a PERK.  Each is dedicated to a particular season.  I only use all this gear when I refit for Cold Weather and I put this into an original Lowe-Alpine CFP-90 pack.  During the warmer months, I remove the C/W gear and put it into one of the larger "3-day"  packs.

Additionally, I have one full set of clothing (underwear, T-shirt, socks, pants, shirt, hat, gloves and boots) in a small duffel bag which sits next to the PERK.

This is because I may not be in an "acceptable" set of clothes when disaster strikes, and may not have the time to immediately change clothes.  For all I know, I might be in the shower when the train carrying toxic chemicals goes off the tracks and I may have to evacuate my soapy self while trying to outrun the deadly chemical cloud wafting down my street.  I can attach the small duffel bag to the pack and throw the ruck on my back and run down the street (or get in my truck) stark nekkid.

(And for those of you interested in such things, no, I have never conducted a bug-out drill exercising this particular skillset).

However, this gives me a kit that I can use anywhere, under practically any circumstance and covers the basics of what it takes to survive.

Just some thoughts, hope they help.

Prof.

Da Fat Kid

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #35 on: February 15, 2009, 08:13:50 AM »
Professor  Is there a reason you would remove the MRE's from original package? Also I am not familiar with Nalgene containers could you please fill me in on those. Also on the first aid supplies. I got a "ready made" kit at Wal-Mart. This is one of the best kits I have seen. It is in a zipper bag with grab handle and shoulder strap. The bag is designed so when you open it it has a coat hook to hang up and everything is in view in clear pockets and easy to access. There are individual packets (which I really like) of things like aspirin, non-aspirin, antacid, burn cream, sting away, iodine, cleansing pads, alcohol pads and many wound dressing and bandaging items. There is also room to add in other things of your own. I just think it to be much easier to get a ready made and add to. Wal-Mart was selling this kit for about $20.
Also you said you have not done a drill . I would highly recommend that you do a drill. Put your pack on and take off down the street/road. Then head out in the bush and set up camp using only what you have in your pack.. It is far better to find out on a drill what works and what doesn't. Practice now and it will come automatic when the time comes you need it.

Offline archer

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #36 on: February 15, 2009, 09:46:26 AM »
Professor  Is there a reason you would remove the MRE's from original package?
Lots of people remove the MRE contents from the original packaging to remove items they do not like/need and reduce the space used.


Offline rustyknife

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #37 on: February 15, 2009, 12:51:48 PM »
Looks like everyone is well equipped but just in case here is my setup..I split my system into three components.

First, I carry on my belt every day a multi-tool, round diamond knife sharpener and a mag fire starter.

Second level is a duty belt with lb suspenders. On this belt I carry..
   2 one quart canteens w/cups
   small butt pack with extra socks, t-shirt, under shorts, wool gloves and 100 ft of paracord
   2 pouches, one on each side that contain three bars of 2400 calorie emergency rations , the kind the Coast
            Guard endorse, above the rations are small individual packets of instant coffee (about 30 units ea side)
   On the back of one pouch is my survival knife/sheath (no brand name/made myself)
   On the back of the other pouch is a smaller pouch that contains fishing kit, dryer lint, insect repellent, two
            kinds of fire starting systems and a small first aide box that also has some small harness needles and
            dental floss
   2 M16 mag pouches, one each side that hold 180 rounds total of 7.62x39
   This whole second level fits into a medium sized gym bag. On the bottom of the gym bag is a wool blanket.
            There is a pair of well worn hiking boots on the blanket then this web gear between the boots. My
            favorite outdoor jacket is attached at the gym bag handles.

Third level is an Alice pack, med size. It contains..
   A sleeping bag, mummy style rated at 0 deg
   Tube tent, one person, camo
   Military poncho
   Series of maps of my local area, plastic scales for the different maps, topo maps and USGS quad maps ( I like
             maps)
   A much more complete First Aid kit takes up the entire middle outside pouch
   200 ft para cord
   Spool of trip wire, three colors
   Face paint
   Black mechanic gloves
   Can of "Monkey butt Powder" sim to baby powder
   Handy refer to edible wild plants
   Another set of cloths, socks, t-shirt, undercloths, pants...For pants I like using "carpenter pants" they have
             cargo pockets on them, also a nice shade of brown
   Folding saw
   Couple rolls of TP smashed down flat in Ziploc bags
   Personal hygiene kit with scentless shop, hand towel and wash rag
   Compass and compass pouch on left shoulder strap
   Small binoculars in a pouch on right shoulder strap

Last but not least my Bible in a Ziploc bag

I recall this all from memory so there might be some smaller items I missed.

   

   

Offline The Professor

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #38 on: February 15, 2009, 03:10:24 PM »
Professor  Is there a reason you would remove the MRE's from original package? Also I am not familiar with Nalgene containers could you please fill me in on those. Also on the first aid supplies. I got a "ready made" kit at Wal-Mart. This is one of the best kits I have seen. It is in a zipper bag with grab handle and shoulder strap. The bag is designed so when you open it it has a coat hook to hang up and everything is in view in clear pockets and easy to access. There are individual packets (which I really like) of things like aspirin, non-aspirin, antacid, burn cream, sting away, iodine, cleansing pads, alcohol pads and many wound dressing and bandaging items. There is also room to add in other things of your own. I just think it to be much easier to get a ready made and add to. Wal-Mart was selling this kit for about $20.
Also you said you have not done a drill . I would highly recommend that you do a drill. Put your pack on and take off down the street/road. Then head out in the bush and set up camp using only what you have in your pack.. It is far better to find out on a drill what works and what doesn't. Practice now and it will come automatic when the time comes you need it.
 

Three things:

As someone else pointed out, I strip my MRE's to reduce bulk and weight.  The outer plastic bag is weight and bulk as are the cardboard "boxes" in which the retort pouches are packaged in also are extra weight.  You can save quite a bit of space by stripping them down and putting the contents in a slidelock bag.

And Nalgene bottles are the same type of bottles you find at REI or any similar sports store.  Mine are simply wide-mouthed and square as opposed to having a sippy-straw, pop top, or bitevalve and round.

And, for clarification, I said I had not done a drill wherein I ran down the street buck naked carrying my gear. to quote :

". . .I can attach the small duffel bag to the pack and throw the ruck on my back and run down the street (or get in my truck) stark nekkid.

(And for those of you interested in such things, no, I have never conducted a bug-out drill exercising this particular skillset). . ."

I hope you'll forgive me when I say that I have absolutely no plans, whatsoever, to let my dingle dangle in the snow just for the sake of saying I ran around naked with my PERK.  Not only am I worried about both Frostbite on the tip and building up a callus from the dragging, but I would really rather not spend 72 hours in psychiatric observation trying to explain to the nice Doctors that it's all a misunderstanding, I'm NOT a lunatic nudist survivalist and that I was real sorry Mr. Smith's 5 year old girl caught a glimpse of the Professor's whatsit.

We, as a family, often do "drills," but in the form of camping trips and backcountry roams here in the Colorado Rockies several times a year.  As a general rule, these are the same items we carry on such trips with the addition of some serious photography gear (my wife is a shutterbug) and a little different tenting arrangements.

Prof.



Da Fat Kid

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #39 on: February 15, 2009, 04:15:08 PM »
Prof.  TY for taking the time to answer my questions. Sorry I totally misunderstood about the drill. But keep in mind that in that kind of cold everybody looks like sisters anyway so nothing to worry about.

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #40 on: February 18, 2009, 11:31:23 AM »
Cold,  why not use the hatchet as a tent hammer.  I like all of your explanations on your gear, but in this one case it just seems like useless weight.  You have the hatchet, the e-tool and yes there is always a rock.  just trying to save you some back ache.   ;)

Offline creuzerm

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #41 on: February 18, 2009, 09:52:32 PM »
A thought just occurred to me.

BOB - gonna spend a lot of time in your shoes, hygiene is less then stellar, etc.

Toss in a tube of anti-fungal cream for athletes foot.

Nobody packed their flip-flops in their BOB, so everybody is gonna get it.

Offline Roswell

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #42 on: February 18, 2009, 11:21:10 PM »

And, for clarification, I said I had not done a drill wherein I ran down the street buck naked carrying my gear. to quote :

". . .I can attach the small duffel bag to the pack and throw the ruck on my back and run down the street (or get in my truck) stark nekkid.

(And for those of you interested in such things, no, I have never conducted a bug-out drill exercising this particular skillset). . ."

I hope you'll forgive me when I say that I have absolutely no plans, whatsoever, to let my dingle dangle in the snow just for the sake of saying I ran around naked with my PERK.  Not only am I worried about both Frostbite on the tip and building up a callus from the dragging, but I would really rather not spend 72 hours in psychiatric observation trying to explain to the nice Doctors that it's all a misunderstanding, I'm NOT a lunatic nudist survivalist and that I was real sorry Mr. Smith's 5 year old girl caught a glimpse of the Professor's whatsit.


+1  that was an awesome answer

Offline The Professor

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #43 on: February 20, 2009, 12:50:32 PM »
A thought just occurred to me.

BOB - gonna spend a lot of time in your shoes, hygiene is less then stellar, etc.

Toss in a tube of anti-fungal cream for athletes foot.

Nobody packed their flip-flops in their BOB, so everybody is gonna get it.

Y'know, I actually do carry a tiny bottle of Tinactin and a small powder bottle of Gold Bond in my gear. It's one of the things I've always done since I was a grunt.  That's why I also have so many socks.

 I honestly don't know why I forget about posting it.   

 There are a couple other things I don't include.  When I posted this, I just cut and pasted my standard checklist.

<sigh>

Guess this means I gotta do an inventory.

Oh, the wife is gonna be SO pissed.

The Professor

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #44 on: March 15, 2009, 09:11:06 PM »
(This thread has been selected as a “best of” thread by Heavy G.  You can search for “best of” threads by using that term in the search mode.  Everyone on the forum is encouraged to reply to a post they think is “best of” worthy so we can all search for them.  For more information on the “best of” thing, see http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=3423.0 )

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #45 on: March 27, 2009, 12:20:48 AM »
HI folks,

New to the forum, but here's my BOB contents...

Spare body armor, six loaded mags of softpoint for carbine (folding stock AK) and pistol (glock)
longsleeve silk underwear, knit hat, rainproof pants
milsurp poncho
2 1 liter bottles of water
heavy knife, Becker rescue tool.
3 contractor grade cleanup bags (like lawn and leaf bags but 3 mils thick and VERY large)
folding metal shovel
12 nasty tasting protein bars repackaged inside of a doubled mylar bag
Tylenol, Excedrin migraine formula (has caffeine and aspirin, keeps you awake), extra strength Gold bond powder, Zinc oxide,  Imodium, Sudafed, benadryl, antibiotics (two), vicodin, powdered charcoal, sting swabs, iodine, vetwrap, tampax, superglue, bandaids, tincture of benzoin and moleskin.
alcohol stove, milsurp sierra cup/kit (tactical spork)
premade coffee packs (instant coffee, cocoa powder, sweetener and cremora)
6oz of 95 percent rubbing alcohol
200 bucks in small bills
2 pair heavy socks
sunglasses with old pair of my regular prescription glasses.
1 pair boots OLD (already broken in, just not worn out - rotated to this use) I treated the boots with copious amounts of lanoline (the pure stuff) that I got from Walgreens (special order at the pharmacy counter) - hey, it keeps sheep dry!
Firemaking kit (ferrocerium, magnesium(already shredded - bought from fireworks reseller), wad of cotton, hexamine, 2 bic lighters.
Deep-sea fishing leader (125lb test)
6 steel spikes (think really big nails)
Paracord wrapped around anything that I can, cans, bottles, knife.
suture kits.
Duct tape, biohazard grade (look it up, sticks about the best out there), about 25 ft of it  - rolled onto a steel spike.
syringes, for injecting benzoin into blisters.
2 small LED flashlights, each takes 1 CR123 battery.
rugged metal compass and pedometer.


It all fits into a small/medium size backpack I have from my teeanger years.  I put this together a couple of weeks ago when I realized I had the stuff in different cars and places already assembled - but not together because some stuff (like the shovel) I only had one of.   It's still a work in progress, the prescription meds you CAN get your doc to prescribe if you explain why you want them (backcountry treks outside of human contact). 

I didn't want to put any weapons in it simply because I'm always armed anyway.  Figuring the idea was to get safe, not hunt or allow myself to get engaged with bad guys.  The BOB is a work in progress, I think I have too much ammo - but any scenario where I'll NEED ammo I believe I should have enough of it - I might switch to FN P90 and the pistol to save weight, but the lightweight bullets bother me.  I've also considered switching to one of the glock plastic shovels, but a metal shovel can cut sod without risking breakage. 

Might use one of those ultra-lightweight sleeping bags and bivy shelter, but the GOOD bivy shelters are a bit bulky.

Suggestions?


ldmaster

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I considered a field guide
« Reply #46 on: March 27, 2009, 12:33:44 AM »
Looks like everyone is well equipped but just in case here is my setup..I split my system into three components.

.........
   
   Handy refer to edible wild plants
 
..........

I recall this all from memory so there might be some smaller items I missed.

   

   

I considered the field guide to edible plants, but then I remembered that edible wild plants have almost NO calories in them and with something on the order of 80 percent of wild plants in the USA being inedible AND/OR toxic, I figured I'd just poison myself.  I've eaten bugs, and furry things a few times on camping trips, and it's my understanding there's almost nothing that has fur, or crawls that will poison you - and the creature has already done all the work of concentrating the calories from plant life for me.  I also figured that since I was bugging out, most of my time was better spent constructing a shelter and setting snares, instead of gathering enough edible plant life to make a difference in my survival - no such thing as a shelter that's TOO well made.

thoughts?

Bueller?  Anybody?
« Last Edit: March 27, 2009, 12:36:57 AM by ldmaster »

Offline shadowalker_returns

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Re: I considered a field guide
« Reply #47 on: March 27, 2009, 01:30:36 AM »
I considered the field guide to edible plants, but then I remembered that edible wild plants have almost NO calories in them and with something on the order of 80 percent of wild plants in the USA being inedible AND/OR toxic, I figured I'd just poison myself.  I've eaten bugs, and furry things a few times on camping trips, and it's my understanding there's almost nothing that has fur, or crawls that will poison you - and the creature has already done all the work of concentrating the calories from plant life for me.  I also figured that since I was bugging out, most of my time was better spent constructing a shelter and setting snares, instead of gathering enough edible plant life to make a difference in my survival - no such thing as a shelter that's TOO well made.

thoughts?

Bueller?  Anybody?

these are my solution to emergency calories in a small compact size:
http://www.majorsurplus.com/Emergency-Survival-Food-Tabs-P14370.aspx
they have a taste like Whoppers but much harder to bite on. They are also glucose based so if your diabetic they are probably a no-no. Used them for a three day hike in the Sierras up by lake tamarind. I was glad to eat something else after three days. I like to keep a small variety of food stuffs but these tabs will do in a pinch. I keep a case on hand.

http://www.majorsurplus.com/Emergency-High-Energy-3600-CalorieCarbo-Fiber-Bars-2-Pack-P14373.aspx
These taste like a cocanut vanilla wafer but are thicker and crunchier. My kids like them (also used as road snacks). I keep three cases on hand.

And finally I include Solgar brand Vitamins in my pack for nutrition so I only have to provide calories with my food sources.

Adding some noodles and beef jerky really can make a difference in the long term palatability of the above emergency food items.

Regards,
Shadowalker

Torpedo

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #48 on: June 03, 2009, 12:03:35 AM »
Hey guys

 I got this list from a website f=by Neil Strauss, he just wrote a book I recommend called "Emergency: this book just may save your life", his prior stuff is kinda different but this book is really good, I think his story is very similar to people who awaken to how important being prepared is.

Let me know what you guys think of this list, any suggestions are welcome

Thx

ALICE PACK

[or, better still, as one reader suggests, "if you really want to go incognito, get a hiking BOB in a non-military color; sew on a a patch or two (Greenpeace, PETA, Canadian Flag) and you are now transformed from a wolf to a sheep."]

Food Bag
Mess Kit
3 self-packed bricks of food, approximately 4-5 days for one person, each with two MRE's, and assorted jerky's, candy bars, additional foil-packed tuna/spam, energy bars, soonest rotation is late 2011.
Dead space is filed with assortment of cold brew ice teas, sugar packets, splenda, fast food condiments (ketchup, mustard, honey, taco sauce, salt, pepper, hot sauce), bouillon cubes (chicken and vegetable), about five feet of aluminum foil folded.

Misc bag
Trash bags
Votive Candles
Deck of cards
Ziplock bags
space blanket
Solar/crank-powered radio/flashlight
Hygiene bag
Feminine bag
-Contents: lipstick, nail care kit, lotion, pumice stone Bag of water flavoring, juice, punch, coffee, and some onion soup mixes to spice up gamey wild-caught animals
Can of athlete foot spray
60 multi-vitamins
100 vitamin c
Insect repellant
Sun block
Camp suds
Gold bond powder
Package anti-bacterial wipes
Tooth brush
Tooth paste
Travel-size bar of dial soap
Travel-size purell
Travel-size q-tips
Travel-size deodorant
4 disposable razors
Condensed beach towel
2 Condensed hand towels
Camping utensil set
Six-pack of tube socks

Tool bag
Folding saw
Multi-head screwdriver
Pliers
Electrical tape
Nails
Needle-nosed pliers
Crescent wrench
Book: combat skills of the fighting soldier
Field shovel/pick
Hammer/hatchet/pry bar

Utility pouch
Sewing kit
Vegetable seeds
Emergency whistle
Waterproof matches
Fire paste
50 feet rope
Cable ties
Extra batteries (AA and AAA)
Magnesium block/flint
Trip/snare wire

Top storage pocket
2-man tent strapped to top
Emergency Bivvy bag
Book: survival, with updates
Book: Counter mobility
Book: booby traps
Book: field sanitation
Signal mirror
Signal fireworks/flares
Compass
Whet stone

Barter pocket
Coffee
80 Tampons (OB for increased carry)
Lighters
Rolling tobacco
Toilet paper
2 bottles water purification tabs
Anti-diarrhea tabs
Gold/Silver coins
$200 in small bills

Misc. pocket II
2 rain ponchos
Toilet paper
250 ml Clorox bleach (purifies btwn 40-60 gallons depending on cloudiness)
6 Power bar snacks
Dog treats
Notepad
Pens
Intruder detection kit (eye screws, tops of party poppers-freaking loud w/o the body)
Copies of passport, drivers license, and other personal documents

Shoulder Strap Pouches
Gun cleaning kit
Survival knife
Binoculars
12 ga shot shell holder (12 rounds)

Emergency first-response belt
Dust masks
Eye goggles
Marking chalk
Gas shut-off tool
Head lamp
2 canteens, each with water purification tablet bottle
First aid kit (dressings/band-aids, field surgical kit, latex gloves, waterproof tape, snakebite kit, dental tools, analgesics, first aid army field manual, sunscreen, anti-diarrhea, trauma pads, space blanket, medical scissors, etc.)
Work gloves
Power bars
« Last Edit: June 03, 2009, 12:07:55 AM by Torpedo »

Offline Beetle

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #49 on: June 03, 2009, 12:08:41 AM »
Wow great list... I love the patch idea.

Offline Roswell

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #50 on: June 03, 2009, 09:57:45 AM »
I don't think that lipstick is going to be of much use and it may melt.

It is a great list, however it is very long. I would look at making a seperate bag for your BOV with some of those bulky items or even storing them at your BOL.

Torpedo

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #51 on: June 03, 2009, 05:57:56 PM »
This BOB , I plan to keep in the vehicle, but thx for the input

Offline flashcard

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #52 on: July 16, 2009, 10:25:46 AM »
I couldn't find a better thread to post my question in, but I'd appreciate some advice if anyone's got some to spare :) If this should be a new topic, or if it's been covered - please point me in the right direction.  I couldn't find anything similar with the search function, or the "best of" search.

I've been working on a bob/bib/emergency prep kit, etc. at home (city, no BOL) for the event that we get stuck in or need to evacuate to...? but I'm much more concerned about what to carry on me during the day, in the event that I can't get home first.  I don't have a vehicle (my spouse does), which is mostly fine because it is practical and healthy for me to get around on foot.  BUT - there's no way I can carry a huge, complete BOB with me on my hour long walk to work, and then back again home (I usually take transit home).  It would be impractical and I'd look homeless.  I do carry a small-ish backpack/book bag with me though, and I think it would be awesome for my strength and endurance to slowly start adding more things to it for my everyday kit. 

In order from absolute most important items, what should I keep on me?

Offline Buffy

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #53 on: July 16, 2009, 05:01:05 PM »
My bag is small, weighs about 12 pounds. Its what I carry when I'm hiking.
It has food, water, a bivvy sack, a poncho, first aid kit, paracord, headlamp, Swiss Army knife, pepper spray, matches.
I keep other stuff in my car; change of clothing, hiking boots and trekking poles, blanket, extra water, light sticks, small charcoal grill, maps.
Much as I would like to have other stuff, I don't think I would get very far carrying a heavier load.
However, I think I will put together over-the-saddle packs for the horses to carry if needed. These packs could also go into the vehicle if I had to leave from home.
Probably a good idea to find out how far you can travel with your BOB. I hike regularly.
Trekking poles make a huge difference for me.

Hare of Caerbannog

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #54 on: July 16, 2009, 06:32:28 PM »
I couldn't find a better thread to post my question in, but I'd appreciate some advice if anyone's got some to spare :) If this should be a new topic, or if it's been covered - please point me in the right direction.  I couldn't find anything similar with the search function, or the "best of" search.

I've been working on a bob/bib/emergency prep kit, etc. at home (city, no BOL) for the event that we get stuck in or need to evacuate to...? but I'm much more concerned about what to carry on me during the day, in the event that I can't get home first.  I don't have a vehicle (my spouse does), which is mostly fine because it is practical and healthy for me to get around on foot.  BUT - there's no way I can carry a huge, complete BOB with me on my hour long walk to work, and then back again home (I usually take transit home).  It would be impractical and I'd look homeless.  I do carry a small-ish backpack/book bag with me though, and I think it would be awesome for my strength and endurance to slowly start adding more things to it for my everyday kit. 

In order from absolute most important items, what should I keep on me?

flashcard
Do you routinely go through any kind of security check on a daily basis, like a metal detector or anything like that?
Also, what is your comfort level with things like self protection. Do you feel confident you can handle most situations if something turns physical or is that something you would want to prepare for?

Offline flashcard

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #55 on: July 16, 2009, 08:13:27 PM »
flashcard
Do you routinely go through any kind of security check on a daily basis, like a metal detector or anything like that?
Also, what is your comfort level with things like self protection. Do you feel confident you can handle most situations if something turns physical or is that something you would want to prepare for?

You're making me paranoid, Hare! Of all the things you could've mentioned, you probably picked my biggest vulnerability.  Nope.  I could probably handle mediation/negotiation better than your average Jane, but I have almost no confidence in my ability to physically defend myself.  I don't even look tough and intimidating - at least I'm not waifish (I never thought I'd say that).  No security checks or metal detectors of any kind except at airports.  My best defence: I look pretty broke :)

Hare of Caerbannog

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
« Reply #56 on: July 16, 2009, 08:41:46 PM »
You're making me paranoid, Hare! Of all the things you could've mentioned, you probably picked my biggest vulnerability.  Nope.  I could probably handle mediation/negotiation better than your average Jane, but I have almost no confidence in my ability to physically defend myself.  I don't even look tough and intimidating - at least I'm not waifish (I never thought I'd say that).  No security checks or metal detectors of any kind except at airports.  My best defence: I look pretty broke :)

No problem there.
The reason I chose the lowly hare as my avatar is that I believe there is an advantage to looking harmless.
The key is to look harmless but hold a deadly secret.
It can be something as simple as a can of pepper spray to taking defense classes and learning how to take down the bad guys.
Unfortunately a lot of that requires money and for most of us, money is tight.
And there are a lot of "defense" courses that are just a waste of money.
I'm impressed by something called Systema which is a Russian martial art.
Jack did a thread about it here:
http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=967.0
But for short term, I have to recommend pepper spray. You should have at least two small cans of it in your bag or in a pocket or anywhere that you can get to it fast, but don't put them together.
Also, a couple power bars for some quick carbs for energy, and at least a quart of water, considering your distance from you home. Maybe some basic first aid stuff like some butterfly bandages, a couple maxi-pads and some medical tape.
Keep in mind, your best tool is the one between your ears.
Focus you mind and keep a clear head. Think about possible situations before they happen and you will be better able to handle them if they happen.

Offline Freshman Preppy

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #57 on: January 08, 2010, 08:32:43 PM »
I have a GHB in my car.  I live in Northern Virginia so the most likely impact from a big emergency would be a complete traffic jam on I95 which would cause me to abandon my vehicle and walk home. 
I keep the Get Home Bag and a case of water in my car.  I also have a small, mesh back pack which my son used to use for school in the top of my bag.  If I end up hoofing it, I'll probably end up with an unprepared coworker.  They don't know this yet but they will be carrying a small back pack full of water bottles.  :-)

Offline JGreene

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #58 on: January 15, 2010, 01:16:35 PM »
Mine is still (and probably should) evolving.  I had an ALICE pack with the regular stuff in it, but it took about 25% of my trunk.  Since 99% of my travels don't take me away from civilization, I decided to break it down.

I have a GHB (Get Home Bag) that I keep in the car.  This has the necessary things to get me home or a days travel on foot, safetly.  The balance is at home ready to go and now includes a few more 'camping' kind of items.  If we needed to bug out from home, I'd have it there.

Everyone is going to be different. 

Offline joeinwv

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Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
« Reply #59 on: January 20, 2010, 09:17:49 AM »
I have not seen a lot of mention of coins - I always stash a few bucks in quarters. Never know when you may stumble across a vending machine or pay phone in your travels.