Author Topic: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack  (Read 29858 times)

Offline AZCeltic formerly occeltic

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Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« on: October 19, 2011, 11:49:19 PM »
Forgive me if this is not the best place to start this topic, but I can't find anywhere else on the forum that seems to fit as well. A couple of months ago I was attacked by a Pit Bull while working, and without going into too much detail, found myself to be unprepared to fend off the attack. I was in a crouched position on a sidewalk in front of a home preparing to perform maintenance on a piece of telecommunication equipment. I heard a short bark as I knelt down to work, but thought nothing of it until I happened to glance up in time to see the pit running through the front yard just ten feet from me! I only had time to stand up and try to avoid letting the dog attach to me anywhere. I was bitten on both forearms, and kept spinning back and forth while keeping my arms away from the snapping jaws of the dog. If I hadn't seen the dog coming, he would have had me on the ground. I hate to think how that would have turned out.
Because I am still working in the same industry, and subject to being in a position where animals may be loose and aggressive, I am considering various ways to protect myself in the future. I would appreciate any and all ideas to put the odds in my favor.
If the mod of this thread can find a better spot for this subject...please feel free to move it.

Thanks!

Occeltic

Offline phuttan

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2011, 02:11:11 AM »
This subject has the potential to pies people off, but I understand what you felt. So, if a canine gets ypu down unarmed, try to get your leg in position to disrupt his movements by pushing or pulling. Wrestling, MMA other ground styles can help you develop techniques. Then try to control the head as best you can. Choking, breaking and crushing techniques can work. When younger and faster, grabbing the lower jaw and bending and twisting to the chest worked for me a couple of times. It also seems to make them a bit hesitant to commit to a bite after. I guess because of the pain memory. Yelling no as they come at ypu can get them to break off momentarily.

In this type of situation, any  weapon can make a big difference. Could be a shovel, stick, screw driver, knife, etc.

Offline Truik

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2011, 05:05:19 AM »
I always have people rolling their eyes or shaking their head when I say this, but...it works.

If a dog does attach itself to your hand or arm (and this advice is ONLY for this situation), make every effort to ram it down their throat as far as possible. The dog will do everything within its power to extricate itself from you and probably end up huddling, gasping recovering on the ground thereby allowing you to get to a safe vantage point. (Trying to pull away can cause further damage to you by ripping and tearing.)

Yes, I have done this. I have even used this tactic to wrestle the animal to the ground and firmly grasp its throat (not choking it, just holding it) putting it into a submissive position on its back and keeping it their until it "submits" and stops trying to fight against you. This may take a couple minutes.

Once a dog is submissive to you, you can usually let it up and it will go away on its own accord or, in some circumstances, try to follow you, wagging its tail, being playful and even displaying some loyalty.

The greater hazard would seem to be the negligent owner, if there is one, showing up and being upset about you having spent some quality time with the dog.

You may be thinking "What about rabies or bacteria?" or similar thoughts. Well, if the dog already has a hold on you, the same process would have to be followed anyway. You may as well try to get out its grasp and this process has always worked for me.

Of course, the best thing to do is to avoid letting said critter clamp down on you in the first place. But if a dog DOES place a clamp hold on you, that's my recommendation.


Offline Shaunypoo

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2011, 07:24:43 AM »
If no one sees the dog attack you and the owner comes out and sees you holding the dog in the submissive posture, I think you would be in some deep doo-doo.  In the eventuality that you are in a fight for you life, go for the eyes.  I love dogs (own 2 rescues), but if I saw a dog attack someone or it was attacking me, I would not hesitate to kill it if I had to.

Offline Lee

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2011, 08:49:30 AM »
It is really hard to give solid advice on this because every situation and every dog is different.

No matter what the situation, if the dog has a hold on you, the best bet is to try to get on top of it rather than trying to get away from it. Dogs are faster than you. Any motions of retreat will leave you more unbalanced and unprotected than taking up a stance of going toe to paw with it. A dog wants to be on top. Your body on top of his will go a long way in convincing him who the alpha is.

Obviously, the best defense would be to deter the attack.  In your line of work, I would recommend first trying to augment how you determine if a dog is in the area.  Not knowing your regular protocol, I would recommend the following when approaching a property:
1)Knocking on the door to see if anyone is home. If so, ask about dogs. If they own dogs ask to be introduced.  By this I dont mean asking the owner to let you toss the frisbee with the dog. But simple having the dog see its owner shaking hands with you will go a long way in telling the dog that this guy is not a threat to my pack leader.

2) Making a lot of noise around a property as not to surprise a sleeping dog. Let the dogs know you are there. Maybe even use a dog whistle as you approach the house.

3) Should a dog come charging you, the use of an air horn might be an option to both scare the dog and alert owners and nieghbors of the situation.

4) Arm yourself with a non-leathal weapon.  Face it, no matter how much your life is in potential jeapordy, you do not want to shoot or stab someone's dog.  And I am sure your employer will not allow you to go in armed. So I recommend a stun gun, the small contact kind, not the ones that shoot darts on wires the police use.  Pepper spray would be an option but i dont like it as it can blow back in your face on a windy day.  A deterant (air horn) in one hand and a non leathal weapon (stun gun in the other) would be my prefered way of facing a dog threat.

5) Keep a bloodstopper kit in your car that has a minimum a quick-clot sponge/guaze and a compression bandage.

Offline RPZ

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2011, 11:47:48 AM »
I would only add that dog attacks in packs are no rarity either. And to carry any weapons that are legal in your jurisdiction so you have choices.

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2011, 02:51:49 PM »
I always have people rolling their eyes or shaking their head when I say this, but...it works.

If a dog does attach itself to your hand or arm (and this advice is ONLY for this situation), make every effort to ram it down their throat as far as possible. The dog will do everything within its power to extricate itself from you and probably end up huddling, gasping recovering on the ground thereby allowing you to get to a safe vantage point. (Trying to pull away can cause further damage to you by ripping and tearing.)

Yes, I have done this. I have even used this tactic to wrestle the animal to the ground and firmly grasp its throat (not choking it, just holding it) putting it into a submissive position on its back and keeping it their until it "submits" and stops trying to fight against you. This may take a couple minutes.

Once a dog is submissive to you, you can usually let it up and it will go away on its own accord or, in some circumstances, try to follow you, wagging its tail, being playful and even displaying some loyalty.

The greater hazard would seem to be the negligent owner, if there is one, showing up and being upset about you having spent some quality time with the dog.

You may be thinking "What about rabies or bacteria?" or similar thoughts. Well, if the dog already has a hold on you, the same process would have to be followed anyway. You may as well try to get out its grasp and this process has always worked for me.

Of course, the best thing to do is to avoid letting said critter clamp down on you in the first place. But if a dog DOES place a clamp hold on you, that's my recommendation.

Been there, done that, and yes this absolutely works. Find a shutzhund trainer if you want to try it out under more controlled conditions.

Other (and better IMO) option that doesn't involve being in the dogs mouth involve learning to dodge them while close up. They can't twist or turn once they have committed to an attack, and I've been able to both dodge and tackle dogs this way. Basically you learn to see when they have committed and you move in 45 degree angles to get off the line of attack.

That all said, the owner is BY FAR the greater threat. I got death threats for pushing a pit/chow mix to the ground after dodging it after it attacked me in middle of a street. 99.9999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999% of the time, if the dog is a POS, the dogs owner is the very scum of the earth.

ETA: Also, pepper spray and the milder dog sprays work and might be worth adding to your tool belt. Personally I recommend the pepper spray simply because you may need it for the two legged POS that owns the beast.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2011, 03:00:08 PM by inbox485 »

Offline Shaunypoo

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2011, 02:58:26 PM »
I don't know how often the advertisements at the bottom change, but I just finished reading your post and there is a picture of a cute pup and the words "Need your dog trained".  Very appropriate.

While I am fearful of a dog attack in your circumstance, I agree with inbox485 that the owner is probably more of a threat, not just physically, but also legally.  Ask your company what a credible response to this situation would be. What can you do to defend yourself so you are not a liability issue?

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2011, 05:00:22 PM »
 I'll totally agree with inbox on the pepper spray suggestion. I've warded off 2 dogs with some when out berry picking. They were "farm dogs" that just never got attention or regular feed. Not pits, not rotties, just mutts someone thought would somehow protect their goats.( I was well over 300 yards from their property) After the 2nd one, I traded off for a 9mm. I never saw them again though. I heard that the owner put them down himself.


 When I was 14, I was attacked by a dog. A friend and I were in the woods, turning a tree house we built years earlier into a tree stand for hunting. The neighbors dog (150+lb monster lab/dane mix) came out of nowhere and attacked my friends small beagle mix. He kicked the dog and it turned on him. I whacked it with a hatchet, then it came after me. That dog took 3 solid hatchet hits to the head and never slowed down. When all was said and done, my friend ended up with over 60 stitches on various wounds, and my left thumb was torn loose at the web. 32 years later and I still have the scars of the torn web and a crescent moon where a tooth went through the palm of my hand. The little dog didn't survive the attack.


 I never realized how powerful a dog was. Yes, he was huge, but I never expected that much intensity, concentration, or the fact that he took three hatchet blade hits to the head without so much as a flinch. All these years later, even as a dog owner, (we have 5) I am very leery of strange dogs. I hope no one ever has to experience what we did. Protect yourself in any way you are able. Carry pepper spray or whatever you can.  (within limits of not losing your job of course)

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2011, 10:21:30 PM »
I've been attacked by dogs several times. Got bit a couple of times.

Then I spent a little while learning how to handle a dog attack.

If you have time to face the dog before he attacks you're halfway to winning. Don't let one sneak up on you. Stay alert.

Time permitting...

First trick: Squat down and pick up a rock. Even if there isn't one there. Draw back like you're going to throw it at the dog. Many dogs will shear right off if they think a rock is about to bounce off their head.

Second trick: Run straight at the dog, roaring, with your arms spread. Look big, look mean, look hungry. He may beat feet. (Be the Alpha!)

If he doesn't run, keep on closing, bringing you hands close to you face, but not covering it. You want to smother the dog's charging leap and turn it in to a hind-leg stand-up.

When he stands up, kick him squarely in his little doggie-weenie. Try to kick it through the goal posts.

If you can't punt him in the replicator, you want to defend against a high bite rather than low one. Better that he latches on your forearm than your face, and better the forearm than the lower leg. They can take you down fast if they lock onto a leg and shake or drag you off balance.

If you wind up with your forearm in his mouth, wrap your other arm around his neck a little lower down, and twist his head straight backwards until it's upside down and you hear an odd popping noise.

If it's your fist in his mouth, open your hand and stuff it down his throat like a spear. It'll go in easier, faster, and with less damage than a fist. It will also go in a lot deeper.

You don't actually have to pull your hand out before it dies.

For those that have practiced extensively, when a dog leaps at your face it is quite feasible to step lightly to one side, grab the far front leg (reaching behind the close one) and snatch it back like you're trying to start last year's lawnmower.

The dog will spin two and a half times before crashing, and it'll be so disoriented you can just jump on it with both feet.

If a dog grabs your lower leg, the (usually) best move is to crumple right down on top of it with your full body weight, and then go for the interior of the ears, or the eyes, or any two solid pieces (like the hind legs, for example, or the jaws) that you can make a really hard wish with.

For those of us of a more brutal persuasion, who may not wish to actually wrestle with a loathsome beast, nothing beats a water pistol loaded with straight ammonia. It has  great range, won't blow back in your face in less than a hurricane, and it'll send Cujo Himself crying for his mommy. In a heartbeat.

Beats the hell out of pepper spray.

Works equally well on people, too.

The thing about dog attacks, especially packs, is that most people don't realize how much damage a dog (or each dog) can do, nor how fast.

It is impossible to run away from an attacking dog. If you turn your back, they'll rip you to shreds. So you have to deal with them very aggressively.

Now--all that being said, I'm not anti-dog. In fact, I like dogs. I pet them, and I hug them, and I pet them...and I even bring them yummy scraps from home. Literally. I save up treats for a old lunkhead American Bulldog named "Static". He's sweet. Dangerous to home invaders, but sweet.

It's just that liking ends for the dog that attacks a person the instant that it does so.

(Break)(Return)

Sigh, I admit it. I have a streak of dark humor.

If you ever have to shove your hand down a dog's throat and the POS owner comes out to give you a hard time about it, don't let go.

Just start screaming "Get it off me! Get it off!

Don't stop screaming until the ambulance arrives, and they give you the first shot for the pain.

Even then, keep on moaning and hyperventilating--and try to hold on to the lungs until you're actually inside the hospital.

Your attorney will love you for it.












Offline phuttan

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2011, 01:44:01 AM »
First, I'd like to emphasise that yelling no at a dog work better than most people would think. Domestic dogs are used to obeying when someone yells no, even if it isn't the owner. As far as shoving your arm/hand into the back of the throat, try sticking your finger into the joint of your jaws and try to bite down. Your jaw won't work very well and it's painful. It works the same with dogs. When getting bit, I like to bend the jaw towards the chest. If not practical, shove into the back of the jaw with the arm/hand. Next, eyes and throat attacks. Pepper spray work. Didn't use it myself but saw it.

Last, yelling no at a dog works pretty well to brake their motivation for moment.

Pat

Offline AZCeltic formerly occeltic

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2011, 07:28:04 AM »
Wow! Thanks for all the great suggestions, many of which the company I work for has provided. My manager tried to have pepper spray approved, but was turned down due to insurance complications, etc. He is now trying to see if the use of an ultrasonic dog deterrent would be okay. I have already ordered a stun gun that will fit into my tool pouch and be close by should I ever need it...for man or beast.
I simply hate the idea that I have to deal with the possibility of having to use it, but if I had had it at my disposal the day I was attacked, the end result would have been different, and I wouldn't have been looking at blood streaming down my forearms.
Some of the neighborhoods I have to work in are laced with rear alleys where the utilities are located, and I often encounter dogs, behind very questionable fences, that look as though they would love to take me down. It's like entering a jungle.
As for the owners....where the hell are they anyway? I know there are responsible owners, and you can tell by their dogs behavior who they are. Then there are those who own dogs as a way to threaten anyone who might even consider coming close to their home and property...even in a regular track home neighborhood. Thanks again for the suggestions. Please keep them coming. Time to head to work....and the battlefield of cable TV!

Occeltic

Offline Russkie

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #12 on: December 17, 2011, 06:34:53 PM »
I work at a vets office as a kennel guy (for those of you that dont know, yeah I'm in high school, yeah its my first job), so im around new dogs about once a day. I've been attacked 4 times in the two years i've been working there, three times by what i'd consider a threat-dog (one that could actually hurt me).

The way the office is set up, the kennels are in the far back where no one else really can see or hear what goes on. And because of this, after the second attack, my boss essentially told me I could do whatever I need to do (without killing it) to defend myself.

I've learned a little about fighting dogs through all this. I'd like to second the part about sticking your hand down its throat if it latches onto your arm. I initially learned to do this to give dogs pills, and it works for this too.

Another thing i've learned, walls are your friend. If your outside and see a dog in a "im gonna eat you" kind of posture, get close to a wall. I've found that (excuse me, animal lovers..this is a bit crude) its fairly easy to slam a dog into a wall, just give it a shove with your weight behind it. I've only done it once, to a German Shepherd who had decided it had had enough of me. It sure made that dog back off, and I havent had a problem with it since. I know that seems cruel..but I made the decision I would rather hurt the dog and potentially lose my job than get hurt myself, and I had no doubt the dog had in mind to hurt me.

One other thing, male dogs arent much different that male humans..If you can get in a shot to the testicles, that sure slows 'em down. I was advised that part by the boss's husband, never done it myself

Hope that gives some ideas

Offline Cedar

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #13 on: December 17, 2011, 07:21:15 PM »
If a dog does attach itself to your hand or arm (and this advice is ONLY for this situation), make every effort to ram it down their throat as far as possible. The dog will do everything within its power to extricate itself from you and probably end up huddling, gasping recovering on the ground thereby allowing you to get to a safe vantage point. (Trying to pull away can cause further damage to you by ripping and tearing.)

Yes, I have done this. I have even used this tactic to wrestle the animal to the ground and firmly grasp its throat (not choking it, just holding it) putting it into a submissive position on its back and keeping it their until it "submits" and stops trying to fight against you. This may take a couple minutes.

I was actually going to say this before I saw your post. If you know you are going to get bit no matter what you do to prevent it, take the matters on your own volition and ram your arm down the dogs throat as far as you can, even if it up to your elbow. Yup.. you just took all equasions on the dog's side away. It is now thinking of nothing but getting you out of their mouth, throat and wherever else your arm ended up. You really did not follow along with the dogs plan of chomping on you.

I worked with dogs to get them to be socially acceptable as a side job and one dog was a nasty McNab-X they paid me a HUGE sum to quit biting people, for once I took a partner with me, someone who worked well as my assistant at the vet clinic I trusted and we knew each others modes. My first meeting of the dog is it came flying at me and launched. In mid air, I had this dog by the head and somewhere back by its body and I was swinging it around fast enough I was hoping it would not connect with my arm. Got it to the ground. Had a knee on its neck, the lower front leg was being pulled up as the top front leg was being pushed down and it was pretty much immbolized. Not for the faint of heart to say the least. My partner muzzled the dog for me and then I sat on the dog awhile longer and talked to it and petted it, while it growled at me the whole time. Eventually I was his best friend, but it took weeks. It is difficult to explain on 'paper' and not an easy way to learn the technique, but in a pinch lean on its neck.. and keep that bottom front leg up and prevent the bottom back leg from getting under it. Kinda like on this horse. http://img.fotocommunity.com/Pets-Farm-Animals/Horses/Romania-hors-castration-a19063033.jpg

Cedar

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Offline M14fan

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #15 on: December 18, 2011, 08:39:51 AM »
A more unusual but effective deterrent that I have used on several occasions is, if you can see the attack coming, to bend at the waist and dangle your arms. While screaming/roaring advance rapidly towards the animal maintaining your stooped posture and flap your arms wildly. Quick and easy to do and will send most dogs scrambling to escape this new and bizarre beast.

I have also had one dog go into full retreat who was rushing me in my own yard using an entirely different method. I had a toddler in my arms and was unable to do the above technique or any other that involved increasing the dog's access to the child. I drew my sidearm and disengaged the safety. Dog started trying to run backwards.

I am a dog lover and dog owner and I will aggressively defend my dogs. I will however tolerate no threat to my loved ones (family or pets) from man nor beast and both understand and am willing to accept the risks associated with using measures up to and including lethal force.

Offline cmxterra

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #16 on: December 18, 2011, 09:23:28 AM »
My dog defense on the far right. Also works on two legged animals

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #17 on: December 18, 2011, 04:04:09 PM »
My dog defense on the far right. Also works on two legged animals

your EDC, I presume?  What is that gold thing on your key chain?  I like the silver coin thrown in there.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #18 on: December 18, 2011, 06:46:20 PM »
your EDC, I presume?  What is that gold thing on your key chain?  I like the silver coin thrown in there.

My guess is that it is a peanut lighter???

Cedar - *who waits to see if she is right*

Offline AZCeltic formerly occeltic

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #19 on: December 19, 2011, 05:59:12 AM »
One of the advantages of living in Arizona is the freedom to carry a sidearm without being hassled for doing so. Of course I would have to keep it hush hush from my employer. I've already had to explain why I was carrying an aluminum bat in my work vehicle....perhaps I should also carry a ball and mitt! Anyway, the ideas on how to deal with aggressive beasts...both kind...continue to be well detailed and useful. It is sad that many of these ideas must come from actually having to fend for life and limb in order to obtain them. I can see now that this was indeed the best place to put this post, and how it can apply in many ways to the potential threats among us.

Occeltic

Offline cmxterra

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #20 on: December 19, 2011, 08:08:41 AM »
your EDC, I presume?  What is that gold thing on your key chain?  I like the silver coin thrown in there.

the gold thing are the ashes of our first born child.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #21 on: December 19, 2011, 10:14:18 AM »
the gold thing are the ashes of our first born child.


:'(

Cedar

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #22 on: December 19, 2011, 12:07:41 PM »
the gold thing are the ashes of our first born child.

Condolences. I don't think that is what MS was thinking.

Offline cmxterra

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #23 on: December 19, 2011, 01:38:15 PM »
Condolences. I don't think that is what MS was thinking.

The wife and I both carry one. Just a nice little thing to keep with us.

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #24 on: December 19, 2011, 05:37:30 PM »
The wife and I both carry one. Just a nice little thing to keep with us.

golly, now I feel bad asking. :-[  I agree that it would be a nice thing to carry. 

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #25 on: December 19, 2011, 08:26:42 PM »
And a peanut lighter does look similar.



Cedar

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #26 on: December 19, 2011, 08:45:48 PM »
I frequently see similar keychain containers at pharmacies for cardio patients who want to carry their nitroglycerin tablets within easy reach.


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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #27 on: January 30, 2012, 09:10:45 PM »
Kung fu fist to poke an eye out is kind of like this:


 I think I heard you can shove an arm in the dogs mouth such that he is sort of stuck with something in his mouth. You can go for the dogs eyes.

 Effective use of a stick may be useful. A stick maybe 6 feet long that is thick enough to be stiff, but not too thick so it is nimble to twirl makes a good walking stick and has many useful movements for self defense. A little skill with that can probably go a long way.

 I just cut a staff from some maple sapling around my camp the other day. It's good to have a few around, but you need warmer weather to practice and right now it's dead winter.


Check out this video of a stick movement, very cool and looks deadly, it is broken down from slow to fast. I think you could use a longer stick than what is in the video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJ1WdKe6keU

here is a great video on potential stick uses. This guy could probably shred a couple of german shepards:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNfd3fPF6e8&feature=related

more stuff:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLebEGBBBsg&feature=related

 The thing with stick fighing is it is kind of advanced and alot of schools won't teach it to you until you have been to alot of classes, but I think you can learn some from videos like the first one and similar and it's a good workout as well.

 It does seem that some people care more for there dogs than other people. I see dogs can be friendly, but they also can be very primitive and mean without knowing what they are doing really.

« Last Edit: January 30, 2012, 09:22:41 PM by surfivor »

inbox485

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #28 on: January 31, 2012, 12:08:27 AM »
Kung fu fist to poke an eye out is kind of like this:


 I think I heard you can shove an arm in the dogs mouth such that he is sort of stuck with something in his mouth. You can go for the dogs eyes.

 Effective use of a stick may be useful. A stick maybe 6 feet long that is thick enough to be stiff, but not too thick so it is nimble to twirl makes a good walking stick and has many useful movements for self defense. A little skill with that can probably go a long way.

 I just cut a staff from some maple sapling around my camp the other day. It's good to have a few around, but you need warmer weather to practice and right now it's dead winter.


Check out this video of a stick movement, very cool and looks deadly, it is broken down from slow to fast. I think you could use a longer stick than what is in the video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJ1WdKe6keU

here is a great video on potential stick uses. This guy could probably shred a couple of german shepards:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNfd3fPF6e8&feature=related

more stuff:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLebEGBBBsg&feature=related

 The thing with stick fighing is it is kind of advanced and alot of schools won't teach it to you until you have been to alot of classes, but I think you can learn some from videos like the first one and similar and it's a good workout as well.

 It does seem that some people care more for there dogs than other people. I see dogs can be friendly, but they also can be very primitive and mean without knowing what they are doing really.



Main issue with sticks / clubs / etc. is that they wouldn't be my first choice (my first choice being pepper spray followed by a .45 if necessary) and in most states that aren't either shall issue or effectively shall issue, sticks and clubs are not only illegal, but it is a more serious crime than carrying a gun w/o a permit (the reason why is a bit OT, but think Jim Crow). Hate to have the legislature rain on liberty's parade, but staying out of jail is a liberty worth balancing.

As far as taking whatever the dog bites and ramming it as far back the dogs mouth, yes that works, but it assumes you will be able to get the leverage needed to do that while the dog is trying to tear a piece out of you. It is also one of those things where it applies to dogs with mouths big enough to literally take away pieces of you (like whole muscle groups - not just nips of skin), and inside a mouth like that is NOT a happy place even if you do know how to deal with it. It is a good to know if you are bit, but should not be a game plan. I'd rather smother a dog to the ground than try to choke it with my arm or leg inside its mouth. It is more applicable to convincing puppies that hand biting isn't appropriate than trying to convince a frenzied dog that you aren't worth it.

Offline Truik

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Re: Protecting yourself from an aggresive dog attack
« Reply #29 on: January 31, 2012, 12:27:24 AM »
As far as taking whatever the dog bites and ramming it as far back the dogs mouth, yes that works, but it assumes you will be able to get the leverage needed to do that while the dog is trying to tear a piece out of you. It is also one of those things where it applies to dogs with mouths big enough to literally take away pieces of you (like whole muscle groups - not just nips of skin), and inside a mouth like that is NOT a happy place even if you do know how to deal with it. It is a good to know if you are bit, but should not be a game plan. I'd rather smother a dog to the ground than try to choke it with my arm or leg inside its mouth. It is more applicable to convincing puppies that hand biting isn't appropriate than trying to convince a frenzied dog that you aren't worth it.

When I recommended this, it was intended for an incident where a decent-sized dog has already clamped down on your arm or leg. By no means do I recommend actively pursuing an animal to shove a body part down its throat. And, of course, its not intended for dachshunds and chihuahuas. 

As far as its applicability, the concept is all too appealing when a pitbull has a deathgrip on the arm with which you would normally draw your weapon.

Finally, it isn't intended as a method of dispatching the animal. It is a method of freeing your body part.