Author Topic: Basic fighting techniques for everyday self defense?  (Read 22492 times)

Offline David in MN

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Re: Basic fighting techniques for everyday self defense?
« Reply #30 on: May 10, 2013, 10:04:25 AM »
Nothing here I disagree with. Avoid best. Look like the kind of guy or gal who isn't a victim: second best. Situational awareness mandatory.

I've always felt that the brand of martial art doesn't matter. All have weaknesses. I box. I guess it'd be pretty easy to kick me. But then, the Tae Kwon Do expert kicking me might not be prepared for a left hook to the jaw. There is no best. MMA and Krav Maga are sexy right now so finding a gym is easy. Go to a gym that offers a free first lesson or lets you sit in on a class. Try a few and you will find a combination of art and teacher that you will gel with. I've done Judo, Jiu Jitsu, boxing, Thai kickboxing, wrestling, savate, and even classes in sumo. You never know what will connect with your mindset. For the past 6 years boxing has been my thing but I am starting to miss Judo.

Offline yoshi

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Re: Basic fighting techniques for everyday self defense?
« Reply #31 on: May 10, 2013, 12:57:12 PM »
Nothing here I disagree with. Avoid best. Look like the kind of guy or gal who isn't a victim: second best. Situational awareness mandatory.

I've always felt that the brand of martial art doesn't matter. All have weaknesses. I box. I guess it'd be pretty easy to kick me. But then, the Tae Kwon Do expert kicking me might not be prepared for a left hook to the jaw. There is no best. MMA and Krav Maga are sexy right now so finding a gym is easy. Go to a gym that offers a free first lesson or lets you sit in on a class. Try a few and you will find a combination of art and teacher that you will gel with. I've done Judo, Jiu Jitsu, boxing, Thai kickboxing, wrestling, savate, and even classes in sumo. You never know what will connect with your mindset. For the past 6 years boxing has been my thing but I am starting to miss Judo.

totally agree!

Offline mithgar50

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Re: Basic fighting techniques for everyday self defense?
« Reply #32 on: July 05, 2013, 08:27:07 PM »
As someone with very little training I have been very successful in fights in my life for one very simple reason.  It is all in the mindset.  My father told me when I was in the 6th grade and getting picked on by a bully to keep 3 simple things in mind and the next time he pushed me to finish it.

1.  In a fight someone is going to get hurt.  Do not let it be you if at all possible.

2.  There is no such thing as dirty fighting only winning and losing.  Kick or punch your opponent where it is going to do  maximum damage with minimum effort.

3.  The person who acts the toughest is often a coward and doesn't really want to fight you so a well thrown punch will often end a fight quickly.

These things are IMHO in order of importance and the order given to me by him.  The mindset is the most important.  If you can't stomach hurting someone then don't get into a fight or you will get hurt.  If you don't have the mindset to accept the consequences of hurting someone then don't get into a fight.  I have seen a simple bar fight turn deadly by accident with a punch being thrown and the person moving wrong and ending up receiving a fatal blow.  This is not a pretty thing and always a possibility when you fight.  Remember you are not the only one moving and no matter how well trained where you intend to hit someone is not always where your blow will fall.

With that said if you think you can have the mindset and still want to learn to fight then some basic and I mean very basic boxing is a good way to go.  This will teach you how to punch both for force in your punch and a few different types of punches.  I have found that practicing a few moves over and over to get muscle conditioning so it happens without thought is more effective than knowing dozens of moves and having to figure out which one to use.  This gives your opponent a split second to jump first which goes back to be the aggressor if you want to be successful in a fight.

Will finish by restating what I started with.  I have been in more fights than I care to remember in my misspent youth and while I carry the scars from lost fights I won many more than I lost.  No matter how good you are there is always someone bigger, meaner and better prepared mentally than you are.

PS I found they ones that were meaner than me were usually marines due to the mindset they get from the training ROFL

inbox485

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Re: Basic fighting techniques for everyday self defense?
« Reply #33 on: July 05, 2013, 11:24:11 PM »
Best stuff to learn... I know a guy ;)

Best stuff I've seen on the webs, that would be http://valriazanov.com/

Get your mind right and that is most of the battle. After you learn to see it, most of the people that really get effed up in a fight get most of the injuries after they give up, and they usually give up after being half hearted to begin with.

Offline RootStrike

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Re: Basic fighting techniques for everyday self defense?
« Reply #34 on: July 06, 2013, 05:46:47 PM »
Those are some great posts above. I have added to my knowledge. If I may I'll add some thoughts too...

1. I like Frank Sharpe Jr.'s credo: "don't go to stupid places with stupid people and do stupid things" - in other words don't go looking for a fight, don't escalate, if you sense danger best to evade.

2. I have a book I looked through, there is also a Russian website called "Get Tough" that has some interesting info in it about WW2 strikes, etc.

3. I believe that taking some martial arts instruction has helped, specifically Wing Chun in my case. I started with never having really "punched" anything and over time I have better balance and more spontaneous action/reaction. Our sifu emphasizes practicality and thinking outside the box, so that helps. I also have watched some live Krav Maga class and it looked like a useful skillset.

4. I like watching the Systema demonstrations - you strike from whereever you happen to be. Use surprise. Actually surprise, a la Sun Tzu, is ALWAYS a powerful weapon.

5. I highly recommend Tim Larkin's Target Focus Training class. If you go to a live training, it is 2 days, and it is quite expensive, I got a sale on it a few years back, otherwise it is around $1500 or $2000? (don't quote me).

his system focuses on injury and striking whatever target is near you, damaging the attacker and spinal reflexes. In other words, you break/damage a target. If there is a conflict, you are either "doing" the damage, or GETTING damaged. Much like above, inbox mentioning how a person gets more injured because not committed.

They show examples of prison violence and many sports and other ACCIDENTS where people have severe damage, showing how a person's body is vulnerable, even if they are a mountain of muscle.

Along the TFT lines, they have made a new abbreviated online vids and info program, and you can get the DVDs of it, for like $30 something bucks (the DVDS add $60 or so more?) I am not a spokesperson, but if you watch that info, it is EASY to practice.

Oh wait, just found it, it is $47. Don't bash me moderators if I'm not supposed to put links, I've been away for a while. Here is link:
http://www.targetfocustraining.com/aff/5ss/tft-survival-pack/tvsp2.php

The live training is so helpful, but the videos are a good review. They focus on going slow and pushing lightly on the target - you will feel a little pain, but then when you have to do that under stress, speed/power will drive through that target. Plus at the live training we practiced from front, behind, lying down prone or supine, on hands and knees, basically "from anywhere" you strike whatever target(s) are near you. That's it. Strike, strike, strike to nonfunctional.

But above all, follow Frank Sharpe's advice, don't be a jerk, a damaged ego is better than a broken arm or smashed neck, for sure...

Tim Larkin has a quote as well: "violence is rarely the answer; but when it is, it's the only answer." Their stuff is only for if you are in danger and can't get away.

Also, as Jack has mentioned in recent times - never underestimate an attacker. They more than likely will have "friends" to help them, or perhaps a hidden weapon. Never pick or elevate a fight over "ego". Can't we all just get along?? :)

Offline Slow runner

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Re: Basic fighting techniques for everyday self defense?
« Reply #35 on: October 07, 2013, 05:19:19 PM »
Hello, I am new to the site and forums from that matter. I didn't read every post, but  would like to add my 2 cents. I have worked out at a few gyms over the last 10 years and have seen a lot of arrogance ( my system is the best type thing). The two best systems in my opinion are Pekiti Tirsha Kali and The blended arts under Dan Inosanto. We would have guys come in with 1st and 2nd degree black belts and they got schooled by first year students. Street Survivability is the goal. I was very successful with  Te Kwon Do, but I'm 6' tall and very strong. Someone smaller would need an art that didn't rely on size and strength, but maybe speed and flexibility. I would like to help anyone I can find a good gym and if you're in the Tidewater area check out East wind Academy.

http://www.eastwindacademy.com

Offline Andy in NH

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Re: Basic fighting techniques for everyday self defense?
« Reply #36 on: October 07, 2013, 08:01:23 PM »
Taking the class called Extreme Close Quarters Concepts (ECQC) with Craig Douglas (AKA SouthNarc) is a good start.

This class takes an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach to fighting with empty hands, knives and guns from 0 to 5 feet.

It begins with a lecture, demonstration and then practical training to better understand the criminal assault paradigm, how to manage unknown contacts and the basics of Douglas's Practical Unarmed Combat (PUC).

This portion includes a non-linear and non-diagnostic default position which will help you manage initiative-deficit attacks.  It won't make you a Golden Gloves boxer, but will help you remain conscious and on your feet whe the fight starts.

Some basic striking is also introduced and can be used as a follow up to the default position. 

The second day begins with a live fire portion that helps you understand the difficulties of gaining access to your weapons in an extreme close quarters fight and then provides some possible solutions.

The class continues with grounded fighting basics.  It won't make you a BJJ black belt, but will help you understand the need to stay mobile and functional if the fight goes to the ground.

Training knives and Sims guns are used in many of the drills and the force-on-force evolutions.

The third day culminates in a 2-vs-1 force-on-force evolution.  There are plenty of videos posted on the internet of these evolutions.  Some people get scared off from the class by watching the videos, but fail to understand that what they are seeing is the culminating event of three days of training.  Even then, many of the evolutions are scaled down so that those with less training / skill can come away with some learning points. 

The class is often described as an "audit" where you go to find the deficiencies in your self-defense training.

Some people need work on deescalating situations.  Others need to work on their handgun skills.  Many students find that their skill fighting "stand up" (vertical plane) needs work and that their grounded fighting (horizontal plane) need even more work.  A lot of the people who take the class quickly learn that it is their cardiovascular fitness is what needs the most work.

ECQC will show you if you need to spend more time on the range, in the dojo, or on the treadmill.  Maybe all three! 




Offline joeandmich

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Re: Basic fighting techniques for everyday self defense?
« Reply #37 on: October 08, 2013, 12:48:41 PM »
I teach Hung Gar Kung Fu, Muay Thai and Krav Maga in Miami Florida. If you wanted to learn self defense quickly (less than 6 months). I would recommend something like Krav Maga. All we do in this class is techniques. Unlike the my other classes which either have too much too learn for the needs of an adult or are limited by the rules of competition.

I must state that watching videos or reading books is just that. There is no substitute for physical contact.

Try learning to ride a bicycle simply by reading a book or watching a video...

Joe

Offline Shaunypoo

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Re: Basic fighting techniques for everyday self defense?
« Reply #38 on: October 15, 2013, 09:21:06 AM »
One of the reasons I really enjoy taking Krav is my preference for knees and elbows.    I have a plate in my hand from a boxers break years ago from a fight and the only punch I threw left handed was the jab.  Bad contact on a forehead.  I have been in a few fights in my time and learned that there is no such thing as a fair fight.  I haven't been in a fight since taking Krav, and prefer it that way, but my style has changed.  I was more of a guy who grew up watching Stallone and Schwarzenegger punch their way out of things who realized that is a great way to hurt yourself.  Now I am knees/elbows to throats/knees/groins.

Mindset is key, but finding a style that matches you and that you enjoy training is also pretty important.  I like Krav for function and fitness.  Tried a few other martial arts with my brothers, but never liked the strict forms.  Jeet kune do was pretty fun, but life got in the way back then.

inbox485

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Re: Basic fighting techniques for everyday self defense?
« Reply #39 on: October 15, 2013, 11:24:28 AM »

Krav Maga


 ;)   ;D

Half kidding. It is too much like TKD in that everybody swears they know a guy that doesn't suck, but every time I've seen it, there was example after example of how to get dead. To each his own.

Offline JeffieB

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Re: Basic fighting techniques for everyday self defense?
« Reply #40 on: October 26, 2013, 10:24:22 AM »
I have a buddy of mine (and yes this has worked on several occassions but I dont really being the best way) but.... try and tickle them.... Lol, obviiously this is NOT a technique I would tell anyone to use, but my buddy has gotten out of trouble with it, weather they thought he was just brasindead, crazy, or hes even made the guy who was super aggressive chuckle. They throw up hands and you stick out your fingers saying "tickle tickle" fights over lol. DOnt really take this advice just thought it was humourous and HAVE actually seen it used.