Author Topic: Giving birth at home  (Read 14174 times)

Offline ag2

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Giving birth at home
« on: January 24, 2012, 11:29:42 AM »
Heavy G's post made me think of this.  (you know which post I'm talking about)

My best friend and his wife delivered their last two kids at home.  No midwife, no doctor.  It wasn't by choice; kid number 2 arrived within minutes of arriving at the hospital.  Their doctor told them that future kids would arrive faster than they could get to the hospital and their doctor was right.

They went through some training and purchased the kits.  They got a midwife who was never able to arrive in time either.  I think the babies were delivered within 20 or 30 minutes of the start of labor.  By the time she arrived, she just said, "Good job dad, baby and mom both look healthy."

This may not apply to some of us who are older or who have taken preventative measures, but most of us would open our homes to our loved ones who may need to prep for something like this.

Offline Mr. Red Beard (UKtheBUNNY)

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2012, 10:01:45 PM »
While interesting and I wouldn't mind knowing more on how to manage this myself, the thought is also terrifying. I really need to make friends with Veterinarian.

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2012, 02:13:12 AM »
we home birthed my last one.  In some ways I liked it.  A lot.  but, I felt like a bad hostess the entire time, cuz I was not making sure everyone (midwife, nurse, babysitter) had food, and was entertained while I was laboring.  I am not planning it again.  in fact, just after #4 was born, I started this thread that came up with some good information.
http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=4123.msg39419#msg39419

Offline MidnightMidwife

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2012, 08:00:39 PM »
I felt like a bad hostess the entire time, cuz I was not making sure everyone (midwife, nurse, babysitter) had food, and was entertained while I was laboring. 

Mom should not be doing anything but working on her labor.  Someone else should have been designated chief of staff.  I can't believe 'everyone' let you keep running around instead of laboring.

Offline rustyknife

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2012, 09:08:03 PM »
Having witnessed both my sons births I would advise any man or husband to get some training if you plan on or have to do this at home. As a side note, bystanders and friends should be entertained and taking care of themselves and leave the birthing process to the mother. I was truly amazed at the process and  even though I had witnessed this with some animals it did not fully prepare me for what my wife went through.

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2012, 01:30:37 AM »
Mom should not be doing anything but working on her labor.  Someone else should have been designated chief of staff.  I can't believe 'everyone' let you keep running around instead of laboring.

that's just it - I wasn't running around.  and I felt guilty about it.  dumb, I know.  I had a job to do that evening.  but I felt bad for doing it and not my usual job.   ::)  the way a mind works.  like I should be super-woman: able to give birth, cook a 3-course meal, entertain guests and occupy my children all at the same time!

Offline notsofast

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2012, 07:39:25 AM »
When i lived in louisiana, i had a buddy who was dating a pregnant woman. she use to brag about how easy birthing was for her and how her second just "popped out" at an "odd time." in fact, she often called her 2nd her little "american standard." some will get the reference.

she had her third, as well, in a bathroom. in fact, it took all of thirty seconds, from first pain to baby. she went to the bathroom, was in the bathroom for about 10 seconds, screamed for help, before my buddy could get there from the couch, which was about 8 ft. (he was living in a camper), he opened the door in time to drop to his knees and catch the baby.

true story.

i keep telling my GF this story hoping she'll stay home and not run up 20g's  in hospital bills.... yeaaahhhh, she's not havin' it.  :P ::)


i forgot to say what i was gonna say. lol. i got to thinking about his face, when i walked outside that night when the ambulance pulled up.

i think at least a basic understanding of how to birth a baby at home is an excellent piece of info to have. even better if you can take a full home birthing course, and stocking up on a few supplies.



Offline cheryl1

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2012, 10:13:35 AM »
It is one thing to be ready for a sooner rather than later birth at home. BUT...my husband tried to convince me to try a home birth with our third....we would have lost him and maybe me without hospital intervention....and this was after two of the easiest births ever. It is easy to forget in these times that women and children DIE during childbirth. Not worth the risk for me to plan a home birth. That said...I had the med kit, supplies, and everything ready just in case.

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #8 on: January 29, 2012, 12:21:52 PM »
Cheryl, that's just what I was thinking. I recently got into a heated debate about this. Some people forget that the number one killer in women used to be childbirth. It is fine well and good to say "our bodies were made for this," but as a species we are teetering on the line between big brains and compatible pelvis size. Our genes aren't designed to keep each individual woman alive, but rather to perpetuate the species. Just like any other animal.

I *love* hearing women's stories about peaceful//home births. But you know, I also love hearing about women who get to live to raise their babies because of modern medicine. There are zealots on both sides, but as usual the reality is down the middle.

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2012, 02:27:30 PM »
Some people forget that the number one killer in women used to be childbirth.

that is true, but a lot of that death was unclean surroundings and dirty hands.  I also, based on personal experience, wonder how much of the deaths not attributed to unsanitary conditions was also a lack of knowledge about gestational needs.  A low iron count, for example, can cause hemorrhage at birth.  bring up those levels and you bring down the hemorrhaging.

don't get me wrong, I am grateful for modern medicine where it is needed.  I just think it is not needed so much as we think it is.

Offline cheryl1

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2012, 02:43:37 PM »
I just think it is not needed so much as we think it is.

But if you need it during childbirth, you need it right now.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2012, 03:42:49 PM »
I would have LOVED to have had my SP at home, and I always thought I would have a midwife and in my home for years, but for various reasons that did not work out.

1. I did not have any home at that time but a tent and a truck as I was between countries.

2. Due to my age, only 50% of the time does your body even go into labor. I walked hills.. I did jumping jacks practically, I ate spicy foods, I waited.. and waited.. and got induced 3 times and went into 'labor' for about 3 hours.. and then stopped. So a C-section was the only option left. Hospital was a requirement.

Cedar

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2012, 09:46:26 AM »
SO does anyone here know what things one would need to have on hand to prepare for any future impromptu midwifery? That's one of the weak areas of my home first aid kit. I know the basics, sterile pads, gloves, clamps...knowledge. I watched The Patriot Nurse's video about it, and have a few books lined up in my queue to read about the subject.

Offline cheryl1

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #13 on: January 30, 2012, 09:54:59 AM »
Suction bulb to clear the baby's mouth and nose after birth, leather strap to bite on  ;)

Offline Cedar

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #14 on: January 30, 2012, 10:28:21 AM »
Dental floss

Carlmarts

They crush the blood vessels to prevent bleeding, where normal hemostadts have more 'teeth'. Get two. 4 is better.

Get "Where there are no doctors" book and good books on midwifery.

Lots of soft towels. Some traditions include wrapping the newborn in its fathers shirt.

Chuck pads.

Wet washclothes for mom's head. I kept doing that to keep my friend cooler when she was in labor.

Phone number for ER and hospital general in case you have to bail.

Cedar

Offline summer98

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #15 on: June 28, 2012, 11:34:47 AM »
But if you need it during childbirth, you need it right now.

That's why women who give birth at home should have a good midwife. A licensed midwife should carry all the things she needs to do everything for mother and baby aside from a Caesarean. That includes stopping hemorrhages and resuscitation. Home-birth midwives generally lug around giant carts of equipment, and have to use any of it less than 5% of the time.

It is true that most infant or maternal mortality prior to the modern era was caused by poor sanitation. The estimates I've seen place that at 95% of all deaths; hemorrhaging was the cause most of the rest of the time. Too-large pelvis' do happen, but there are extremely rare. A famous midwife near us in Tennessee (can't remember the name, sorry) has delivered over 3000 babies and she's seen that happen exactly twice -and both mothers had gestational diabetes.

Offline Dainty

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #16 on: June 30, 2012, 04:26:09 AM »
It seems wise, if a birth is on its way or a probable possibility, to have the tools and knowledge on hand to handle it in the safest manner in a situation where a birthing professional is not present to assist whether by personal choice or circumstance beyond one's control.

The most extensive information I've found on this subject has been from the Unassisted Childbirth forums. In my experience most if not all there are quite conscious of safety, so their earnest study and discussion of the matter results in a lot of knowledge being passed around.

That's the place I learned about placenta massage for reviving stillborn babies. Turns out the dhais, who are the traditional midwives in India, after being taught infant CPR were having statistically better outcomes in reviving stillborn babies than a clinic staffed with medical personell and supplied with oxygen and all that. Upon investigation it was discovered that in a rural location if an infant is stillborn, efforts to revive it will begin with the cord intact and if it isn't breathing by the time the placenta is delivered then the placenta is placed in a bowl of warm watter and gently massaged while the baby continues to be worked on. In practicing this, more stillborn babies were revived at home than when the best of modern medicine was applied in a facility.

Where and how the safest way to birth is a debate with enough informational fuel to go on endlessly, but I for one really enjoy learning about the safest possible way to birth without medical intervention available, even if it's "just in case" rather than planned. It just makes sense. *shrug*

Edit: This page describing an event where a woman performed a cesarean on herself is a fascinating read. No, I don't think anyone in their right mind would recommend it over a hospital cesarean, but it is notable that both she and her son survived the procedure. And while she may not have if she hadn't received medical attention several hours later, the surgeon who operated on her stated there was no internal bleeding or sepsis in the wound. "According to [the surgeon], Ramírez’ life might have been spared by sitting forward in what he called the traditional Indian birthing position, which ensured that her uterus was directly under the skin made it less likely that she would cut her intestines."

Nice TEOTWAWKI info, wouldn't you say? :)
« Last Edit: June 30, 2012, 04:36:53 AM by Dainty »

Offline cheryl1

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #17 on: July 01, 2012, 07:29:33 AM »

 "According to [the surgeon], Ramírez’ life might have been spared by sitting forward in what he called the traditional Indian birthing position, which ensured that her uterus was directly under the skin made it less likely that she would cut her intestines."

Nice TEOTWAWKI info, wouldn't you say? :)

There is one more reason to get my tubes tied!  :o

Offline LemonGrassMint

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #18 on: September 22, 2012, 02:10:49 PM »
I really wanted a home birth when I found out I was pregnant (only made it 2wks before m/c). My husband and I read up and made sure we knew what we were doing, etc. We're one of the few countries that doesn't do home births as the normal. The Netherlands have a better survival rate than our US hospitals. My parents (who were doctors) were concerned to say the least, and reminded me that I had almost died at birth and needed immediate care and drugs. The combination of a quick (18min) birth and high elevation (Wyoming), was blamed for me not breathing. I live at almost sea level in Florida, but they were still scared about what if the baby needs immediate help, uncontrolled bleeding and so forth. I ended up finding a birthing center that was actually connected by a hallway to the hospital. For the future I'm glad my husband and I know what to do if we have early labor or perhaps run into some one in need. But a nicer than our house birthing center would be my dream option - jacuzzi, shower, crazy birthing chairs, queen size bed, optional midwives, but still extremely close to life saving meds/ procedures if needed.

Offline markl32

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #19 on: September 22, 2012, 05:17:29 PM »


We had a home birth with Midwife for our second child.  First child born in the hospital was not a good experience.  I was sold when I asked the midwife her stats.  In 20 some years she lost one baby in 2000 births attended. Never lost a mother.   Better record than the hospital... 

Offline cheryl1

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #20 on: September 23, 2012, 06:26:32 AM »

We had a home birth with Midwife for our second child.  First child born in the hospital was not a good experience.  I was sold when I asked the midwife her stats.  In 20 some years she lost one baby in 2000 births attended. Never lost a mother.   Better record than the hospital...

Don't forget to take into consideration that high-risk pregnancies rarely are home births. A higher percentage of the hospital births are complicated before labor even begins.

Offline Deadgirl1121

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #21 on: October 19, 2012, 02:15:55 PM »
We planned an unassisted home birth for our last child.  We didn't make it home and had him on the side of the highway.  Everything went well, even though we had two kids, two dogs, and a cat in the car with us. 

I highly recommend the Emergency Childbirth: A Manuel by Gregory White http://www.amazon.com/Emergency-Childbirth-Gregory-J-White/dp/0934426015   Every woman of child-bearing age should own this book.

Offline Roundabouts

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #22 on: October 19, 2012, 08:25:55 PM »
I really wanted to have both my kids at home.  All seemed well and I was healthy no reason to not have a home delivery.  I got such flack for wanting that I gave up and went to the hospital. 

Had I not had them in the hospital both would have died 30 min -2 hours after birth.  After my second one well it didn't look good for me either.  Doctor signed death certificates just in case when he left.  Guess he didn't want to come back for just a signature.  Just strange very unlikely events happened afterwards.  So what seemed normal very quickly turned to life or death. 

I still like the idea of home delivery but not really gun hoe for it as I use to be. 


Offline AutumnDawn

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #23 on: January 12, 2014, 12:12:36 PM »
I know this is an old thread, but it's a subject dear to my heart.

I suffered through a c-section with my first child (unnecessary) and an episiotomy (unnecessary) with my second at the hospital. The procedures could have been completely avoided had the doctor actually listened to me when I told them there was a problem. Pregnant women are treated like sick babies that don't know what's best for them and it infuriates me.

My third child was born at home in a spa tub that I installed in my bedroom. Music, candles, and a whole lot of self education earned me the perfect birthing experience. Labor wasn't painful for me; it just had that discomfort of feeling like you better get to a toilet NOW 'cuz things are gonna roll.  ;)

From my research, there are a few emergencies that you MUST go to the hospital for, but they can be prepped for. Most other emergencies, the hospital would be at just as much of a loss. Old world deaths are attributed to poor sanitation, hemorrhaging, delivery of the umbilicus prior to baby (cutting off baby's oxygen), transverse or breech presentation (which could be turned by a good midwife in many cases), babies getting stuck because mom is under 18 and her pelvis isn't done widening. Simple things like the cord being wrapped around the neck is easy to fix. All the doc does is unloop the cord...

As anyone in this forum should know, prepping for emergencies and keeping your head is key to a good outcome. What was my prep for a need for a doc? I lived a block away from an EMT that went to my church and the ambulance was even closer. I talked to him ahead of time to let him know that he'd be my first call when labor started and my next call if I ran into trouble.

Best experience of my life.  :)

Offline Jojbrandi

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Re: Giving birth at home
« Reply #24 on: September 05, 2016, 03:53:50 PM »
We planned a home birth. We just bought a basic kit online. It was like 60 bucks....I think the site used was cascade medical supplies.