Author Topic: There are people who think Pink Slime isn't a bad thing.  (Read 5189 times)

Offline Oil Lady

  • Lady oil lady oil la-dy hoo
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 3541
  • Karma: 213
  • My book needs more humor. My pen needs more salt.
Re: There are people who think Pink Slime isn't a bad thing.
« Reply #30 on: July 04, 2012, 07:12:39 AM »
I kinda have a theory, if there is words I cannot easily say or it has more than 2-3 syllables in it, I generally don't eat it.

Cedar


Back in  the 1970's, Pringle's New Fangled Potato Chips got introduced to the American market. Their key selling points were

1) the tall can is neat and convenient and reclosable
2) their design and packaging means virtually zero chips are broken
3) they tend to be grease-free and don't leave a smeary, crumb-laden mess on your fingers. 


Here's the first Pringke's TV spot. It's less than 2 minutes long and safe for work.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHkedT1aN8Y

Pringle's immediately became a huge hit in the American snack food market. But the traditional potato chip manufacturers came back at them with an entirely new ad campaign the likes of which hadn't been seen before.

I regret I do not have that (anti-Pringle's) TV ad. I have searched the interwebs in vain for it. All I can do is describe the ad as I remember it.

The traditional potato chips manufacturers same up with a TV commercial where two quiet little boys were passively sitting side by side in a playground, looking up dutifully at an unseen off-camera adult. The hands of the unseen adult reached forth into the frame and handed the two boys each one pack of potato chips. One was Pringle's Chips, and the other was (I think) Wise Potato Chips. The adult said "Okay, kids, here are the rules: You can't open your chips until AFTER you read the entire ingredient label out loud. Then you can eat all the chips you want." The two boys nodded. Then the unseen adult said "Ready, set, GO!" The two boys began reading their ingredient labels out loud. The one boy with the Wise Chips quickly recited "Potatoes, vegetable oil, salt." Then he tore open his bag and started eating. But the boy with the Pringle's Chips was floundering around with impronouncable words and the abbreviations for various chemicals. He then stopped in dismay at the enormity and futility of his task, looked longingly at his peer who was munching happily away, then he looked with pleading eyes to the adult and asked if he could have one of those bags too. 

The parting line of the TV Ad, featuring a closeup of a bag of Wise Potato Chips was "Wise, the natural choice." 

This was not only the first time ANY ad pitted "all natural" against checmical-laden crap in a blatant showdown, but it was also an astonishingly effective ad.  People responded to the simple wisdom that if a child can't even read the ingredients, then perhaps a child shouldn't even be eating it. This ad changed the way Madison Avenue thought about the very concept of "all natural." Prior to this ad, it was assumed that the "all natural" consumer was an entirely niche and specialty market of the hippie college student health nut type, with SOME crossover of novelty and fad purchasing among the young urban professional crowd. But the reaction to this ad --as evidenced by the sudden slump in sales of Pringle's-- proved that everyday housewives from the ranks of middle-class America were freaked out about the idea of their kids ingesting unknowable and impronouncable mystery ingredients. Mom's concerned about their kids being fed chemicals?? Who knew? 

Madison Avenue used to think that the housewife prioritized time-saving devices, and time-saving products -- get the housework and the cooking done faster and cheaper and she'll be happy. As for nutrition, housewives were thought to be eager for foods with more bells and whistles to them -- food with more levels of  technology behind it to make her life easier and make Junior healthier. The George Jetson-style food of tomorrow was sold to her as being time-wise and nutrition-wise far superior to the low-tech/no-tech foods of her grandmother's day.  But this was the first time that technology in our food was revealed to be deemed "bad" by housewives. For the first time, the "all natural" market was shown to be a mainstream desire. 
"This is the first scenario I've seen where I question the survivability of mankind." -- self-made billionaire Richard Rainwater in his business analysis of Peak Oil, "The Rainwater Prophecy," Fortune magazine, Dec 26, 2005

"This is an emergency far worse than World War I and World War II put together." -- CEO of Virgin Airlines, Sir Richard Branson on Peak Oil in CNN's investigative report "We Were Warned: Out of Gas" June 2007/May 2008 03:05

"We've got provisions and lots of beer. The key word is survival on the new frontier." --Steely Dan 1983

"... it doesn’t really matter who is removing your civil liberties, whether it is being done by a democratic government, a kleptocracy, a dictatorship or even the green police. When your civil rights are gone, they’re gone, and you really are in trouble, no matter how good the cause." --UK journalist Anthony Harrington, "Peak Oil and Collapse Scenarios," QFinance, September, 2011

Our parents used to say, "Don't worry, the government will take care of it."
And now our kids say, "Don't worry, the government will take care of us."

No food shall be grown that Monsanto does not own. (It all started with the disastrous 1980 SCOTUS ruling on Diamond v Chakrabarty. Petition your Congressman to revoke all patents on living things.)

"The nation that destroys its soil destroys itself." FDR 1937

The Tin Foil Hat Song by the League of Lady Conspiracists

Offline amtank

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 10
  • Karma: 0
Re: There are people who think Pink Slime isn't a bad thing.
« Reply #31 on: November 10, 2012, 07:07:06 PM »



Pink Slime

Cedar

That is mechanically separated Chicken.

Offline flippydidit

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1400
  • Karma: 77
  • Keep 'em shooting!
Re: There are people who think Pink Slime isn't a bad thing.
« Reply #32 on: November 11, 2012, 04:02:24 AM »
I'm on the same ideological side as Cedar with this slime crap.  One of the many reasons we gave up the city life to go back to the country life was for the health of our family.  We raise our own livestock and crops.  What items we still purchase from the store are analyzed by my wife and myself.  Anything falling into the "processed food" category is only purchased on rare occasions.  That being said, it's highly ironic to me how many self-professed preppers and homesteaders have bought into the viability of the "shelf stable" foods available and highly targeted to our groups.

The largest offender in my eyes isn't "pink slime".  It's TVP and soy.  Textured Vegetable Protein (TVP) is usually comprised of mostly soy.  It can be found in Augason Farms and many other "1 year supply" style foods.  It looks like many "preppers" fall into the mindset that to reach the "prepared" level, they should blindly throw money at a perceived problem.  Rather than taking the time and doing the research to move toward a self-sufficient lifestyle, they trade convenience for health.  My problem with soy is much greater than any of the other "processed foods".  It seems to be used as a filler to replace "real food" in everything from animal feed to baby food.  Here are two links for those who insist that soy is good for you:

http://www.optimumchoices.com/Soy.htm

http://paleodietlifestyle.com/dangers-soy/
Nate
Military/civilian gunsmith/machinist
CEO and Founder of PermEscapes
PermEscapes
PermEscapes on Facebook

"One of these centuries, the brutes, private or public, who believe that they can rule their betters by force, will learn the lesson of what happens when brute force encounters mind and force."
— Ragnar Danneskjöld, from Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand)


Offline Oil Lady

  • Lady oil lady oil la-dy hoo
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 3541
  • Karma: 213
  • My book needs more humor. My pen needs more salt.
Re: There are people who think Pink Slime isn't a bad thing.
« Reply #33 on: November 11, 2012, 07:46:11 AM »
Mountain House proudly declares that they do not use TVP. :)

(I'm pretty sure they NEVER use it. But I wonder if in actuaity they SOMETIMES use it. If they do sometimes use it, I am confident they won't try to be sneaky about it and will label those packaged foods as such.)
"This is the first scenario I've seen where I question the survivability of mankind." -- self-made billionaire Richard Rainwater in his business analysis of Peak Oil, "The Rainwater Prophecy," Fortune magazine, Dec 26, 2005

"This is an emergency far worse than World War I and World War II put together." -- CEO of Virgin Airlines, Sir Richard Branson on Peak Oil in CNN's investigative report "We Were Warned: Out of Gas" June 2007/May 2008 03:05

"We've got provisions and lots of beer. The key word is survival on the new frontier." --Steely Dan 1983

"... it doesn’t really matter who is removing your civil liberties, whether it is being done by a democratic government, a kleptocracy, a dictatorship or even the green police. When your civil rights are gone, they’re gone, and you really are in trouble, no matter how good the cause." --UK journalist Anthony Harrington, "Peak Oil and Collapse Scenarios," QFinance, September, 2011

Our parents used to say, "Don't worry, the government will take care of it."
And now our kids say, "Don't worry, the government will take care of us."

No food shall be grown that Monsanto does not own. (It all started with the disastrous 1980 SCOTUS ruling on Diamond v Chakrabarty. Petition your Congressman to revoke all patents on living things.)

"The nation that destroys its soil destroys itself." FDR 1937

The Tin Foil Hat Song by the League of Lady Conspiracists

Offline Samuel Fairlane

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 457
  • Karma: 9
Re: There are people who think Pink Slime isn't a bad thing.
« Reply #34 on: November 11, 2012, 10:25:01 AM »
I'm not shocked that people think pink slim is a good thing. There was someone on Jacks youtube channel that was thanking God for Monsanto. Might as well thank God for the devil, if you think Monsanto is doing the Lords work. IMHO

Offline flippydidit

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1400
  • Karma: 77
  • Keep 'em shooting!
Re: There are people who think Pink Slime isn't a bad thing.
« Reply #35 on: November 11, 2012, 10:29:40 AM »
Mountain House proudly declares that they do not use TVP. :)

(I'm pretty sure they NEVER use it. But I wonder if in actuaity they SOMETIMES use it. If they do sometimes use it, I am confident they won't try to be sneaky about it and will label those packaged foods as such.)

They probably don't use it.  But they do use HVP (Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein).......with soy.  So I place them in the same category.
Nate
Military/civilian gunsmith/machinist
CEO and Founder of PermEscapes
PermEscapes
PermEscapes on Facebook

"One of these centuries, the brutes, private or public, who believe that they can rule their betters by force, will learn the lesson of what happens when brute force encounters mind and force."
— Ragnar Danneskjöld, from Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand)