Author Topic: TEOTWAWKI hunting  (Read 8798 times)

Offline Prepper Recon

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 123
  • Karma: 6
  • We don't have a lot of time.
    • Prepper Recon
TEOTWAWKI hunting
« on: August 16, 2012, 04:26:01 PM »
I bought a Gamo scoped pellet gun to be a potential game gun in the event of SHTF. My thoughts are that if my bug in turns to a longer time frame than 4 weeks, I can take squirrel and birds in the yard to supplement my protein. I wouldn't want to be discharging a firearm in city limits and alert to my location. I know the squirrels won't last long. The birds, maybe a few days longer, but bugging in is my best option until I can save up for a retreat.

The other upside is that I can target practice in my back yard every week and it cost nothing. I keep thinking of raising some rabbits. I hear they are pretty hardy creatures.

Any other thought on supplementing protein in a SHTF scenario?

Offline archer

  • Administrator
  • Ultimate Survival Veteran
  • *******
  • Posts: 17112
  • Karma: 380
  • #ImissAmerica
    • Journey to Greener Pastures
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2012, 04:37:27 PM »
learn how to make snares and deadfalls...


Offline pokeshell

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 385
  • Karma: 11
  • Against the assault of laughter nothing can stand.
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2012, 04:52:42 PM »
I bought a Gamo scoped pellet gun to be a potential game gun in the event of SHTF. My thoughts are that if my bug in turns to a longer time frame than 4 weeks, I can take squirrel and birds in the yard to supplement my protein. I wouldn't want to be discharging a firearm in city limits and alert to my location. I know the squirrels won't last long. The birds, maybe a few days longer, but bugging in is my best option until I can save up for a retreat.

The other upside is that I can target practice in my back yard every week and it cost nothing. I keep thinking of raising some rabbits. I hear they are pretty hardy creatures.

Any other thought on supplementing protein in a SHTF scenario?

I think the air gun is a great idea. Just make sure to wear eye protection, the pellets are attracted to eyes 8) . They are great for practice. I live in the burb's, and we can even hunt legally with them for small game some seasons, so check you local laws.

endurance

  • Guest
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2012, 04:59:09 PM »
I have an RWS air rifle myself, mostly for target practice and critter control, but yes, the quietness makes it a good SHTF tool, too.  I also stock several thousand rounds of low velocity CB Caps for my .22 rifles.  They're really not much louder than the air rifle, although they won't cycle a semi-auto automatically (work great in a bolt rifle).

I have a herd of about seven deer on the property all winter long, a bunch of bunnies and squirrels, lots of magpies and ravens, a fox that comes through daily, a coyote that rolls the dice every few weeks, and the occasional elk.  In a real SHTF scenario I'd suspect all of these would disappear from the neighborhood in the first three months, which would certainly help my garden production since bunnies and birds harvest probably 2/3rds of my berries currently.  So, while I might end up with a net gain of 75-100 pounds of deer and bunnies in the freezer in the first six months, I suspect after six months that yield would drop to less than 5 pounds a month after that.  While I think small game like squirrels, birds and rabbits will still exist, they'll quickly become rare and leery of humans.  Large game will likely be driven to near extinction.

Rat traps and other traps might come in very handy and you just can't beat the current price on them.  Additionally, they can be set up to trigger off of trip wires for warning systems utilizing .22 blank cartridges.

Offline Mitch214

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 67
  • Karma: 6
  • Thank you all
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2012, 09:32:37 PM »
It's a great idea and a great choice.  I have not thought of an air rifle as an option.  It will serve you well if you bug out also for the same reasons. Not using a loud firearm to take small game.  I will now add that to my gear list

Offline Prepper Recon

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 123
  • Karma: 6
  • We don't have a lot of time.
    • Prepper Recon
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2012, 09:58:56 AM »
Archer,

I love that dead fall trap in the picture.

endurance

  • Guest
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2012, 10:10:16 AM »
It's a great idea and a great choice.  I have not thought of an air rifle as an option.  It will serve you well if you bug out also for the same reasons. Not using a loud firearm to take small game.  I will now add that to my gear list
There's a lot of great options out there and they have their respective strengths and weaknesses.  For accuracy, you generally want something under 1,000fps.  .17 and .22 caliber are the most common size pellets, thus the easiest to find now or post-SHTF.  You can spend any amount you want, but there's some really good options (and lots of them) between $200-300.

Offline archer

  • Administrator
  • Ultimate Survival Veteran
  • *******
  • Posts: 17112
  • Karma: 380
  • #ImissAmerica
    • Journey to Greener Pastures
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2012, 10:54:05 AM »
Archer,

I love that dead fall trap in the picture.
i learned how to make that last weekend.... it caught my finger nicely...

Offline ksdon

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 16
  • Karma: 0
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2013, 06:35:30 PM »
Ok my question in a TEOTWAWKI is where are you going to get your pellets ? do you have a mold? access to lead ?
 Now to at least partially answer that , When I was a kid I did a lot and I do mean a lot of hunting with an daisy powerline 880 multi pump air rifle. being a kid and not always having  pellets or BBs, we found that a locust thorn made excellent ammo.

endurance

  • Guest
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2013, 09:25:21 PM »
Ok my question in a TEOTWAWKI is where are you going to get your pellets ? do you have a mold? access to lead ?
 Now to at least partially answer that , When I was a kid I did a lot and I do mean a lot of hunting with an daisy powerline 880 multi pump air rifle. being a kid and not always having  pellets or BBs, we found that a locust thorn made excellent ammo.
At $9 for 500 pellets (.22 cal), I could have a rabbit or squirrel in the pot every day for the rest of my life for $100.  I think that's better than you're going to do than with any alternative.  Well, longer, really.  If we're really going back to the living conditions of pre-20th century, the average life expectancy was only 48 years, so without antibiotics, vaccines, modern sanitation, refrigeration, etc., planning for enough rounds to last you 50 years is pointless; there's plenty of other things that will get you long before then.

Offline Cedar

  • ...just aDD water...
  • TSP Supreme Galactic Ant
  • ************
  • Posts: 28429
  • Karma: 1396
  • Dont wait for the storm to pass, dance in the rain
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2013, 11:12:32 AM »
learn how to make snares and deadfalls..

Once I read that it takes over 100 traps to feed one person full time.
Cedar

Offline joeinwv

  • The Bee Whisperer
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2579
  • Karma: 92
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2013, 12:06:55 PM »
End of the world hunting comes up a lot, but I just don't see it as being that viable. Hunting success is not guaranteed now during monitored seasons. I just don't see much moving in the woods 3 months after a large scale event, unless you are alone on a seriously large amount of land.

Hunting takes up a lot of time - which is much better spent doing other survival tasks. Trapping, gill nets, trot lines, etc will all yield more with less time.

I would agree Cedar, that you need a large trap line to improve your odds.

Offline Cedar

  • ...just aDD water...
  • TSP Supreme Galactic Ant
  • ************
  • Posts: 28429
  • Karma: 1396
  • Dont wait for the storm to pass, dance in the rain
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2013, 12:32:35 PM »
I would agree Cedar, that you need a large trap line to improve your odds.

I had friends who had 150 mile traplines with 5 cabins on it. I know what they did and didn't get in winter. And I am not sure I want to run back and forth on 150 miles to find food. It also takes practice and luck to get anything in figure 4, a deadfall, a snare or anything else. And keep predators away from it before you can get to it. If you are having issues finding game, so are the predators more than likely.

Cedar

Offline rustyknife

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1069
  • Karma: 30
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2013, 01:31:40 PM »
I had friends who had 150 mile traplines with 5 cabins on it. I know what they did and didn't get in winter. And I am not sure I want to run back and forth on 150 miles to find food. It also takes practice and luck to get anything in figure 4, a deadfall, a snare or anything else. And keep predators away from it before you can get to it. If you are having issues finding game, so are the predators more than likely.

Cedar

Agreed. In a SHTF situation there most likely will be increased pressure on existing game. Trying to feed yourself from the wildlife population will be difficult at best. Most likely beef, horses, sheep, goats, dogs and cats will also eventually be on the menu. It would be good to learn how to butcher and preserve these wild animals now before you have to for survival. The other predator will be other people just as hungry as you.

Offline Freebirde

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 379
  • Karma: 21
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2013, 02:23:11 PM »
I remember someone looking for these in another thread.   http://www.memphisnet.net/product/3884/trot_yoyo   Nothing like hunger to teach multitasking.   Hunting wild game while looking for useful plants while running you traps while checking your fishing lines while forageing for resources while looking out for danger.

Offline blademan

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 354
  • Karma: 10
  • Ask the next question
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2013, 04:53:36 PM »
If you are going to use an air rifle long term, successfully, and ethically, you want to up your tool a little. I've done a lot of research into this. I'm not going to run on and on with numbers and references and details. I can provide that information if someone wants but I'm just going to come to a brief conclusion.
  If you are going to hunt with an air rifle, the .25 is the way to go.  There is nothing wrong at all with the .177 and .22's so I'm not saying that what you have is useless at all. In fact, if you are hitting things like small squirrles and starlings and sparrows as pest control or putting a squirrle in the pot at over 50 yards, a supersonic .177 or .22 with a lead free pellet or a heavy pointed hunting pellet is a good way to go.
   But, for the under 50 yard range and being able to scale up and down on the size of your game, a .25 can't be beat.
   I went to www.pyamydair.com and used their compare feature to find what looks like the best rifle for the purpose.
  Its the Benjamin train np xl air rifle in .25
   For best consistent results in hunting, you need to be in the 700+ fps velocity range. The benjamin rates at 900 fps in .25 with lead free pba ammo. You can use this for hunting, but most air gun hunters stay away from it. My research shows that with .25, a wadcutter style pellet is just about a sure ancho for something up to woodchucks or rock squirrles at 10 to 20 yards. Beyond that, the wadcutter beging to loos accuracy and energy due to tumble. So out past that up to about 35 yards a good diabolo or hunting pellet gets the best results on similar sized quarry. The further away you are the more vital really precise shot placement is and the more important headshots become especially if you are using a light PBA pellet at yardages of 40 or more.
   The benjamin is a break barrel nitro piston (type of gas piston or gas spring) that comes in a hardwood thumbhole stock with sling studs and an unmounted scope for $299.99 from pyramydair. Downside, no iron sights. Some other rifles I saw there in .25 had sights, but this one doesn't. It has a rear rail for the scope, so a rear sight could be added, and a front could be also, if you know how to do it on a firearm, the principle is the same but the barrel is thinner and you should take care not to tweak the barrel if you do so. You could even raise the scope to allow sight through if you wanted to. Or a reflex or red dot could be installed if you were just going to to close or mid range stuff.
   I confined my research for this to the spring or gas piston rifles for price reasons. If you really want hunting power with some supersonic .25s, look into the precharged pneumatics or pcp's.
   Keep what you got, its a good rifle, it will ruin a squirrle's day, but if you want to hunt with an air rifle, get the workhorse.

Offline Canadian Prepper

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 676
  • Karma: 54
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2013, 05:24:53 PM »
Air rifles definitely have several useful roles for survival scenarios, as they generally enable the shooter to practice more and can quietly dispatch small game when used by proficient shooters. I think that a good crossbow would also give decent range on deer in a quiet package that might be more suitable for those of us who haven't the time to get really proficient with a bow, but you'd definitely want a semi-rural or rural area to use that.

Sadly a friend who lives minutes away from me said that the local SWAT team was called when one of his neighbours was spotted using one in his backyardt to scare off racoons, so the suitability of air rifles for urban or suburban use is definitely contextual!

It sounds as if Prepper Recon is realistic about the amount of food he can harvest with an air rifle and how it fits into his bigger picture of other preparations. While I fully support people having guns for defence and hunting in emergency scenarios, I would caution that it usually takes a lot of time and experience to ge sufficiently proficient at hunting to provide a significant portion of one's food, and even that usually depends upon a thorough familiarity with a specific geographic area, so it's effectiveness depends upon one's free time, location and circumstances. I'd be more confident in the ability to catch sufficient fish to feed oneself and their family, especially if one's open to catching panfish, bullheads and other species less sought after by sports fishermen. I could do that even from the urban location I'm currently in, whereas if I'm out of the city, I also know of some lakes without direct road access where one would easily be able to catch serveral or more small bass on a typical outing. It would be hit and miss proposition to rely on game fish from the more popular fishing locations however, so I'd plan my fishing accordingly. One can do this with a minimum of gear or more if one's inclined towards that hobby. Seasonal considerations will also effect what you can or cannot catch (seasons, spawning runs, safe ice in winter, etc).

Offline joeinwv

  • The Bee Whisperer
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2579
  • Karma: 92
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #17 on: February 02, 2013, 05:27:06 PM »
You have to consider what the native fish population is as well - with heavy pressure and no DNR stocking program or bag limits, how long do those fish last?

Historically, to have any sort of civilization or trade, you have to move from nomadic hunter / gatherer to agriculture and specialization.

If you are hunting to stay alive, you will be hunting non-stop.

Offline soupbone

  • Once made a pun out of "Mephistopheles"
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2446
  • Karma: 146
  • If you think you're close enough - get closer.
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #18 on: February 02, 2013, 06:14:18 PM »
End of the world hunting comes up a lot, but I just don't see it as being that viable. Hunting success is not guaranteed now during monitored seasons. I just don't see much moving in the woods 3 months after a large scale event, unless you are alone on a seriously large amount of land.

Hunting takes up a lot of time - which is much better spent doing other survival tasks. Trapping, gill nets, trot lines, etc will all yield more with less time.

I would agree Cedar, that you need a large trap line to improve your odds.

I agree fully, joe. Hunting, as we know it now, will cease to exist. It is too energy intensive for indecisive results - how many times have we gone out, spent a day clambering up mountains or pushing our way through cambrakes only to come home empty-handed? Not really a big issue now, but post-TEOTWAWKI, we could ill afford to waste two or three man-days worth of energy. You weren't planning on going alone, were you? How are you going to hump out 100# of venison, or 200# of elk? Then there's the problem of exposing the hunting party to accident or injury, and who's watching the store while you guys are out playing Nimrod?

As freebirde suggests, shooting game will probably be a serendipitous occurrence - you're doing something else and viola - there it is. Take it. In the mean time, check your traps and snares and fish lines.

The !Kung in the Kalahari Desert make an interesting case study in how a true hunting/gathering society works.

soupbone

Offline blademan

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 354
  • Karma: 10
  • Ask the next question
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #19 on: February 02, 2013, 07:23:50 PM »
Yes, absolutely soup, joe and others. I totally didn't consider if the OP was meaning as a primary food source. Yeah. You might not die, you would be really skinny. Really skinny. Grow, trap, fish, hunt, preserve, and store shelf stable essientials. Have a broad range of tools to meet a broad range of needs. A crossbow as mentioned below would be good. Teotwawki doesn't necessarily mean mad max though it could. I'm not sure I want to be I a world like that. I'm a toughend comfort creature, but a comfort creature none the less. A garden can provide you a lot of meat if you are in the right situation. Did you know that in addition to celery, potatoes, tomatoes and turnips, deer, racoon, squirrle, rabbit, and possum can be harvested from your garden? You pick them with a crossbow, rifle, suitable handgun or air gun. If L.A.O. Has broken down, then there's a good chance game wardens will be doing something besides looking for "poachers" in that world.
   You just have to be observant and patient and appropriate for your situation. Also, look up squirrle poles and bird poles. And keep peanut butter on hand for bait. Rat traps will take squirrles but make a hole in one end to anchor it for non fatal deployment, you don't want to loose your trap. Remember bull frogs also. Frog legs be good. These are best gotten at night unless you get a bead on where they go during the day and can get to them.
     Creeks and public water works(fountains decorative pools etc,)  even in urban and suburban areas, will harbor wayward and late or early spawning ducks and geese. I see this all the time and ache for my air rifle and less people around. Pigeons are almost ubiquitous and learning how to capture and raise them as well as quail and rabbits could make you a very well liked and important (protected) person in a community after a breakdown. Really consider not ramboing this even in your head. Don't disregard it outright but exert more energy and thought to how to have people as a prep. A guest on tsp once said "its impossible to have any level of security without some level of community". This is absolutely true. Lone wolves exist but you rarely find them either throught rarity or alloofness or both. They also tend to be skinny.

Offline soupbone

  • Once made a pun out of "Mephistopheles"
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2446
  • Karma: 146
  • If you think you're close enough - get closer.
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #20 on: February 03, 2013, 06:14:43 PM »
Multi-tasking your garden: growing food AND using it as bait: I've never thought of that. Great idea blademan. Gonna pass that one on....

soup

Offline Freebirde

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 379
  • Karma: 21
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: TEOTWAWKI hunting
« Reply #21 on: February 03, 2013, 07:22:40 PM »
These work on birds and small game as well as fish.   http://www.memphisnet.net/category/nets_cast_multi
Or with the cannons/rockets you can use these for game or perimeter defense.   http://www.memphisnet.net/category/nets_cannon