Author Topic: Fall Crops: Collard Greens  (Read 793 times)

Offline backwoods_engineer

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Fall Crops: Collard Greens
« on: November 05, 2012, 12:03:37 PM »
I had a fantastic dish of ham-hock-cooked collard greens the other day at a BBQ restaurant I frequent.  It has got me thinking about growing some collard greens, either this fall or in the spring.

Here in my part of North Carolina, it very seldom gets really cold until January.  Also, I could grow indoors during the winter and early spring.

One great advantage of collards over other greens is that when other greens are bolting in the heat, collards aren't.

Who grows collard greens?  Any tips to share?  Recipes?

Here are some I found:

http://www.gardeningblog.net/how-to-grow/collard-greens/

ht=http://allrecipes.com/recipe/southern-collard-greens/tp://allrecipes.com/recipe/southern-collard-greens/

Offline LibertyBelle

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Re: Fall Crops: Collard Greens
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2012, 11:52:35 PM »
Not collard greens, but turnip greens here.  I also grow a couple varieties each of chard and kale.  Although next year I do plan on growing the collards as well, since my family really likes my home grown greens.  :) 
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Offline cohutt

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Re: Fall Crops: Collard Greens
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2012, 05:47:37 PM »
In N GA all those greens do fine all winter - I plant in mid september really close together and thin some for the first meal or two, then eat once or twice a week until spring.

While collards are bolt resistant, they taste like crap in hot weather imho. Like brussel sprouts, the flavor sweetens substantially and any trace of bitterness disappears after a frost.  Same with cabbage, summer cabbage in the south is edible but nothing like the same in fall /winter.

Offline sdcharger

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Re: Fall Crops: Collard Greens
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2012, 02:21:19 AM »
I'm growing collards and kale this fall/winter.  I use them in soups and stews mostly.  They work well in a nice white bean soup for example.

Offline backwoods_engineer

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Re: Fall Crops: Collard Greens
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2012, 10:09:33 PM »
Thanks all for the collard thoughts!

Offline LibertyBelle

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Re: Fall Crops: Collard Greens
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2012, 10:15:10 PM »
I'm growing collards and kale this fall/winter.  I use them in soups and stews mostly.  They work well in a nice white bean soup for example.

Sounds delish!  So much, in fact, that I'm putting beans on to soak before I go to bed tonight so I can have beans with kale for dinner tomorrow.   ;)
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Offline sdcharger

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Re: Fall Crops: Collard Greens
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2012, 12:44:33 AM »
(basic) white bean and chicken soup:

1 cup shredded leftover roast chicken
4 cups chicken broth
1 can white beans drained
1/2 cup leeks or onions
1 carrot diced
1 celery stalk diced
rosemary, basil, greek oregano from the garden (use whatever herbs you like I vary mine depending on what I have on hand)
1 tbsp crushed garlic
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
2 - 3 cups chopped greens
salt and pepper to taste

Saute onion/leeks, carrot, and celery in oil for five minutes then add garlic and herbs for a couple minutes then add the other ingredients and simmer for 25 minutes.  Check for taste and add salt and pepper if desired.  Add greens and simmer for 15 more minutes.

For a variety, add some white wine (last ten minutes)  Also, try different veggies.  In the summer I use squash and spinach for example.

I also make a variation with canned chicken, dried veggies, chicken boullion, and canned beans out of my preps.

Offline Perfesser

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Re: Fall Crops: Collard Greens
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2012, 09:54:14 AM »
The first year I grew collards I buried them under a foot of leaves when it got cold. In January I dug through the snow and leaves and they were still growing there.
Last year I put them in a cold frame and we were eating them year round. They'll be a winter staple from now on for us. What the hell else grows in Canada in the winter?
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Offline backwoods_engineer

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Re: Fall Crops: Collard Greens
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2012, 01:03:24 PM »
The first year I grew collards I buried them under a foot of leaves when it got cold. In January I dug through the snow and leaves and they were still growing there.
Last year I put them in a cold frame and we were eating them year round. They'll be a winter staple from now on for us. What the hell else grows in Canada in the winter?

Excellent, Perfesser.  I have heard people in the US South doing the same with potatoes, and having them grow over the winter.