Photobucket

Author Topic: Hurricane Sandy: What worked and what didn't  (Read 3555 times)

Offline Koldsteel

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 92
  • Karma: 3
  • Bee Wrangler and Band-Aid passer
Re: Hurricane Sandy: What worked and what didn't
« Reply #30 on: November 12, 2012, 09:36:42 AM »

Things I Did Wrong and Need To Fix
1. Too many people have gas generators.  Lines for gas were long and not comfortable.  Need to invest in a propane generator and get a large tank on the property (500 pounds or more).

I would like to share my experience with a propane generator so others might not repeat paying the "stupid tax" I paid.

Our home burned in 2007, we rebuilt and wanted a generator to be part of our new home. We sank a 500 gal tank in the ground that would run our stovetop and the generator. We bought a 40 kw generator and found out that the btu requirement for that size a generator could only be met with a 700+ gal tank. So, I had to buy another tank.

If anyone here buys a propane generator, discuss it with a pro that does this everyday and get on the same page. Also, the automatic transfer switch is not that much more expensive than the manual switch. My Generac starts itself and runs a diagnostic once a week. It's a pretty awesome piece of mind.

One other thing, we had been given advise on the 40 kw size of genny by our electrician. It's kinda too large for our house. So again, talk with a generator professional if your gonna drop some big bucks on this kind of set-up.



Offline microdevil45

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 112
  • Karma: 1
  • Never Give Up...
Re: Hurricane Sandy: What worked and what didn't
« Reply #31 on: November 12, 2012, 05:11:22 PM »
I would like to share my experience with a propane generator so others might not repeat paying the "stupid tax" I paid.

Our home burned in 2007, we rebuilt and wanted a generator to be part of our new home. We sank a 500 gal tank in the ground that would run our stovetop and the generator. We bought a 40 kw generator and found out that the btu requirement for that size a generator could only be met with a 700+ gal tank. So, I had to buy another tank.

If anyone here buys a propane generator, discuss it with a pro that does this everyday and get on the same page. Also, the automatic transfer switch is not that much more expensive than the manual switch. My Generac starts itself and runs a diagnostic once a week. It's a pretty awesome piece of mind.

One other thing, we had been given advise on the 40 kw size of genny by our electrician. It's kinda too large for our house. So again, talk with a generator professional if your gonna drop some big bucks on this kind of set-up.

Yea brother, I know some hospitals that don't run a 40kw.  But hey, at least you can power your neighbor hood.  ;D




Offline GrizzlyAdams

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 91
  • Karma: 6
  • Hiker
Re: Hurricane Sandy: What worked and what didn't
« Reply #32 on: November 12, 2012, 06:27:26 PM »
Koldsteel - Thanks for the advice.  I will definitely talk to someone before doing anything.  I think I am going to start with the Honda eu2000i with the tri-fuel kit and then move up from there.

Thanks again.
GA
"There is a huge amount of freedom that comes to you when you take nothing personally."~Don Miguel Ruiz

You are the master.  The mind is your servant.  This is the correct relationship.~Mooji

"We sit together, the mountain and me, until only the mountain remains."~ Li Po

Offline endurance

  • Dances With Newfies
  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 9146
  • Karma: 418
Re: Hurricane Sandy: What worked and what didn't
« Reply #33 on: November 13, 2012, 10:38:18 AM »
One observation that I'm making based on the news coming out of NJ & NY is that most folks had a choice: they could either be a victim and wear that badge going forward or be a rescuer and have that story to tell.  It almost seems like a clear cut choice for some.  I've read a few stories about folks who lost absolutely everything, but now they're going from door to door with volunteer teams in their communities helping distribute food, water, and help folks clean up.  I've also read stories of people who haven't lifted a finger to improve their situation and now all they can do is complain about how they're being treated in the FEMA camps.

Survival is a choice.  For many of us it started with a decision to be proactive before an event to improve our situation after an event.  But I think it's just as easy for one of us to give up and give in to despair if the right situation hits us in just the right way.  Always remain vigilant to the dangers of being a victim and know that if there is anything in your power to play a role in your own rescue, that decision may make all the difference in your life moving forward.
"There are things that you don't question when your home always smells like baking bread."  From The Hunger Games

“No nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.”   James Madison

Offline Morning Sunshine

  • Geese Smuggling Moonbat
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4932
  • Karma: 223
  • There are no mistakes, just Learning Experiences
Re: Hurricane Sandy: What worked and what didn't
« Reply #34 on: November 13, 2012, 11:13:13 AM »
well said Endurance.  +1

it comes down to a choice, an individual choice every time.
"Preparedness, when properly pursued, is a way of life, not a sudden, spectacular program" - Spencer W. Kimball
"Life isn't about trying to survive the storm; but about learning to dance in the rain" - unknown
Luck is what happens when Preparation meets Opportunity

Prepping makes even a hurricane just an inconvenience.

Offline Adam B.

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1342
  • Karma: 39
    • The Uncomfortable Truth
Re: Hurricane Sandy: What worked and what didn't
« Reply #35 on: November 13, 2012, 12:22:35 PM »
Quote
I've read a few stories about folks who lost absolutely everything, but now they're going from door to door with volunteer teams in their communities helping distribute food, water, and help folks clean up.  I've also read stories of people who haven't lifted a finger to improve their situation and now all they can do is complain about how they're being treated in the FEMA camps.

+1 to that!

I mean REALLY — if you can't go into work because your company is buried under water or rubble and you have no electricity, would you rather kill time by going through your neighborhood helping people where you can, or sitting in a FEMA tent getting pissed off when someone comes and un-plugs your iPhone from the extension cord.

I know that more than 50% of the people would rather sit around playing Angry Birds waiting for the FEMA food truck to bring dinner, but I ain't one of them.
Listen to my podcast — The Uncomfortable Truth
(shameless plug)
http://www.theuncomfortabletruth.com