Author Topic: Getting water to my garden  (Read 886 times)

Offline AverageDude

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Getting water to my garden
« on: November 07, 2012, 07:06:30 AM »
We recently built a bunch of raised beds in our back yard. We currently don't have a water spigot close to the raised beds, so I'm looking for a way to get water out to my veggies (hoping to utilize drop irrigation at some point). We have a spigot on the back of our house, and I was thinking of digging a trench from the spigot to the vegetable garden (it's about 200' away from the  house) and burying a hose. I was looking around the 'net for options and came across Farmtek's made to order 1" PVC garden hose and brass hose fittings:

1" garden hose: http://www.farmtek.com/farm/supplies/prod1;;pgwf6500_WF6506.html

Brass hose fitting: http://www.farmtek.com/farm/supplies/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10052&productId=22510&pageId=ItemDetail&isDoc=N

Does anyone see any issues with the hose listed above? I was hoping to bury it so I wouldn't trip over it each time I cut the lawn, though I'm not real sure if this is the right stuff to get. Am I on the right path? Any other suggestions to solve the issue listed above?
« Last Edit: November 07, 2012, 07:13:42 AM by AverageDude »

Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Getting water to my garden
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2012, 07:50:14 AM »
Any reason you can't just bury standard PVC water line?  I think it would be much cheaper.  Then at the end, put on a hose bib.
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Offline AverageDude

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Re: Getting water to my garden
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2012, 08:22:02 AM »

I'm open to all solutions. Where could I purchase PVC water line? I just searched Google for that string and that didn't turn up much. :(

Offline flippydidit

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Re: Getting water to my garden
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2012, 08:30:21 AM »
Any reason you can't just bury standard PVC water line?  I think it would be much cheaper.  Then at the end, put on a hose bib.

Yup.  Have you tried the local hardware store?  Lowe's or Home Depot usually have it all in stock.  That's how we ran water from our back well to the crops.  You don't need the "expensive" stuff either.  Although if you aren't burying it very deep and plan on driving vehicles over it, you may want to go ahead and get the Schedule 40 stuff.  It's not much money, and it will last much longer.
Nate
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— Ragnar Danneskjöld, from Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand)


Offline AverageDude

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Re: Getting water to my garden
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2012, 08:35:50 AM »
Thanks flippydidit. Is this the product you are talking about?:

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100373200/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&keyword=pvc+50%22&storeId=10051#.UJpxjdGGIx0

A search for "pvc water line" doesn't turn up anything on the Depots site.

Offline flippydidit

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Re: Getting water to my garden
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2012, 08:47:58 AM »
Wow.  If you can dig a straight line, you'll save more money by not buying the flexible pipe.  Just connect the straight piping with any angle joint you need to get it where you want it.  No need to get fancy or blow money on something more expensive.  We just keep it simple and inexpensive.  You'll have plenty of other things that you can spend money on.  Of course you'll need a way to bring home longer lengths of pipe.  It will fit in an 8 foot truck bed with a little sticking out, but the store will also cut it down for you if requested.  This is the stuff:

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100348472/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&keyword=pvc+pipe+3%2F4&storeId=10051

By the way, the thanks should go to Fritz.  He answered your question before I did.  But you're welcome.
Nate
Military/civilian gunsmith

"One of these centuries, the brutes, private or public, who believe that they can rule their betters by force, will learn the lesson of what happens when brute force encounters mind and force."
— Ragnar Danneskjöld, from Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand)


Offline AverageDude

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Re: Getting water to my garden
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2012, 08:50:42 AM »
How do you connect multiple schedule 40 pipes together? I don't know a whole lot about PVC.

Offline flippydidit

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Re: Getting water to my garden
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2012, 08:59:21 AM »
You would typically use PVC cement and joints.  Buy the cement two pack that includes the purple primer.  First apply the primer to the pipe end.  Let it dry (like 10 seconds?).  Add a ring around the outside (on top of the primer coat) and slide the joint over the cemented end.  If it sounds difficult, don't worry because it's not.  There are probably a thousand videos online for using the stuff.  Make sure to follow the instructions, and DO IT OUTSIDE.  Otherwise your wife will probably kick you in a delicate area.

The cement actually heats up the pipe, melts it, and fuses it together.  It makes it 100% waterproof, and PERMANENT.  So if you make a measurement mistake........yep, you'll be cutting pipe.  I'd also invest in a PVC pipe cutter or a hacksaw.

It seems like common sense, but some people don't think straight after digging all morning.  DON'T BURY THE PIPE until after you test the system for functionality and leaks.  Some lessons are learned the hard way.
Nate
Military/civilian gunsmith

"One of these centuries, the brutes, private or public, who believe that they can rule their betters by force, will learn the lesson of what happens when brute force encounters mind and force."
— Ragnar Danneskjöld, from Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand)


Offline AverageDude

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Re: Getting water to my garden
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2012, 09:22:19 AM »
Thanks for the info, and I think I have the process now. Are these the joints you use to connect two 10' sections together?:

http://www.homedepot.com/Plumbing-Pipes-Fittings-Valves-PVC-Pipe-Fittings/h_d1/N-5yc1vZbuf5/R-100004541/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&storeId=10051#.UJp8MNGGIx0

I suspect I would need to run 12 of these out to the front of the boxes and I could branch out from there with drip lines.

Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Getting water to my garden
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2012, 10:36:15 AM »
Yep, those are what connect the pipes together.  Here's a decent how to on gluing PVC.  It's much easier to see than describe in words.

F_M
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Offline sentinel

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Re: Getting water to my garden
« Reply #10 on: November 30, 2012, 11:57:43 PM »
Just wanted to add you can make gradual bends with PVC heck on a warm day you can bend it enough to make it fit inside a truck bed

Offline Nicodemus

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Re: Getting water to my garden
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2012, 07:07:43 AM »
Don't let the idea of working with PVC for the first time scare you. It's pretty forgiving, as long as you keep it clean and follow the basic steps.

If you live in an area that experiences low temperatures, just make sure you clear the lines before winter rolls in.