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Author Topic: Pondering government-enforced quarantine issues...  (Read 833 times)

Offline suburbindigenous

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Pondering government-enforced quarantine issues...
« on: November 24, 2012, 10:21:22 PM »
If the government plans to enforce a quarantine in the case of a flu/disease epidemic, and it's common knowledge that most people don't have more than a few days to a week of food in their homes, how does the government plan to keep people in their homes? Will FEMA be dropping off rations on everyone's front porch? I don't think the government can honestly expect people to stay home and starve. Just wondering...
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Thox Spuddy

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Re: Pondering government-enforced quarantine issues...
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2012, 10:34:51 PM »
I don't speak from any knowledge, but rather from cynicism; whatever will result in more dependence upon the government will be instituted in such a way that revenue will flow to their special interest groups that will in turn funnel that money into the ruling class' campaign fund. Scenario: CorporationX sees an opportunity in imposing a quarantine in that the government will have to buy their emergency supplies. The head of FEMA, or whatever government agency or cabinet member can pull it off is a former CEO of that company and will pull the trigger. Then the money begins to flow: taxpayer to government to CorporationX to their executives and finally to campaign contributions of the political party in office.

Just my thoughts.

Online soupbone

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Re: Pondering government-enforced quarantine issues...
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2012, 07:39:10 PM »
I hate to say this, but in some cases, quarantine might be the best possible way of fighting an epidemic. Stay out of circulation for a week or so and break the infection chain. And who is the 'government' implementing the quarantine - local, as in County Board of Health, Federal, as in CDC Recommendation, or some politician with insidious intent?

Now, I'll grant you that I am no epidemiologist, but from what I do know about the spread of infectious disease, I would be more apt to follow the quarantine at least initially, until the matter sorted itself out.

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Offline suburbindigenous

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Re: Pondering government-enforced quarantine issues...
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2012, 08:54:54 PM »
I agree quarantine is the best way to fight an epidemic, but I just wonder how it would actually play out considering how unprepared most people are for staying home for that long. I wonder if/how the government that enforces a quarantine (I don't know what level...federal, local, whatever) will try to pass out food to people to keep them from going out.

More likely, I think an "enforced" quarantine would never work BECAUSE people are unprepared and will leave their homes to seek food/supplies.

My conclusion...if there is an epidemic, quarantine will only work for those who CAN stay home because they are prepared. The rest will spread the sickness and suffer. That's just my train of thought. Curious what others think...
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Offline microdevil45

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Re: Pondering government-enforced quarantine issues...
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2012, 09:14:25 PM »
Great way to clean the gene pool!  JK, they would have to pass out something or people would not listen.  My 2c




Offline chrisdfw

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Re: Pondering government-enforced quarantine issues...
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2012, 09:58:17 PM »
If there is a real issue, I would be happy to have a quarantine. I'll be the first to self quarantine when I know of an epidemic.

Offline cheryl1

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Re: Pondering government-enforced quarantine issues...
« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2012, 10:31:57 PM »
I think it would be more likely that an area would be quarantined, and supplies would be brought in by the military/DHS to a central location inside the quarantine zone.
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Offline flippydidit

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Re: Pondering government-enforced quarantine issues...
« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2012, 03:51:30 AM »
If you've seen the movie "Contagion", it's a pretty good thought provoker on quarantine.  Unfortunately they cast actors and actresses that I personally detest.....
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Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Pondering government-enforced quarantine issues...
« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2012, 06:16:49 AM »
I think that initially, they would announce a voluntary quarantine.  If the disease kept spreading, they would make it mandatory.  Only when the general population stops following the quarantine would they start supplying supplies to a central location.  I think this will be due to lack of planning on the government's part.

But I agree with Thox, someone in the supply chain will get rich because of it.  That will set the precedence for all future disease outbreaks.
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Offline Cordovil

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Re: Pondering government-enforced quarantine issues...
« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2012, 09:55:33 AM »
If there is a real issue, I would be happy to have a quarantine. I'll be the first to self quarantine when I know of an epidemic.

Exact same thought I had.

Probably the single biggest motivating factor behind my food preps is the risk that we will face an epidemic at some point, whether man-weaponized or natural.  In the early days, I expect that the government will, rather than try to enforce a quarantine, keep telling us little worker bees to keep washing our hands and keep going to work.  That's when I think we need to have our antennae up and be ready to enforce a voluntary self-quarantine for our families.  The idea would be to avoid contact with the outside world until the epidemic has run its course, or until we have confidence that it's not something we need to worry about.

That's easy to say, but I imagine it would be difficult to implement for a number of reasons:

1.  Your income / job.  For those of us who don't own our own businesses as our primary means of support, making the decision to self-quarantine, when it's not 100% clear what's going on, could put your job at risk.  Sure, your life and the lives of your family are more important than any job, but we still need a means to support our families, and we'll need income at some point.  Also, there's always going to be some doubt, and so there's the possibility that you'd be losing your job over a concern that is not warranted.  So this is going to be a factor that may prevent us from acting in time.

One way around this (admittedly less than ideal) might be to have some sort of multi-stage quarantine plan.  For example, if I became very concerned about an epidemic, but wasn't certain enough that I would want to risk my job over it, I would try to either find or create a quarantined living space (preferably on my property) for me, separate and apart from my family.  I'm the one who has to go out and work, and maybe for a week or two I avoid all contact with my family while we continue to monitor the situation.  If it looks like things are really getting bad, maybe I quit my job stay in my self-quarantine for another couple of weeks, and then when I'm confident it's safe I will return to the rest of the house and we'll continue our voluntary quarantine together.

The self-quarantine area could be a finished basement (especially if it can be sealed off from the rest of the house, and if it has its own bathroom), a shed, a car, a garage, whatever.

2. Schools.  I don't think that what goes on in school is so valuable that missing a few weeks can't be compensated for, but pulling little Johnny out of class for a few weeks because you're concerned about an epidemic that hasn't been "officially blessed" by Uncle Sam is going to attract some attention from the local authorities, most likely.  I need to have a plan/excuse as to why my kids will be out of school, as well as a plan for them to continue their education so that they're not just sitting home playing all day.

3. Think of anyone and everyone who comes to your house for whatever reason, and think of ways to reduce/eliminate that interaction.  For example, the mailman will be dropping by every day (at least while the post is still running).  Do you want to maybe have him drop the mail in a large metal trashcan out front instead of your mailbox, so that you can just burn it all?  And on that note, maybe now is the time to switch everything that you can to email-statements for bills, account statements etc.  You can still print stuff up for your records as you want them, but cutting down on the mass of mail that comes your way might be important.  Remember the anthrax scare?


Just some thoughts that come to mind.  This is a complicated issue, but one that I need to work through with a plan. 

 you have access to a room (and probably necessarily a bathroom) in your house that you could

Offline chrisdfw

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Re: Pondering government-enforced quarantine issues...
« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2012, 03:31:20 PM »

1.  Your income / job. 

2. Schools.

3. Think of anyone and everyone who comes to your house for whatever reason

1. I work for the government (also am self employed), I can stop showing up and get paid for months if not years.... I pretty have complete autonomy over my operations and I mostly work from home already. I am not sure how the private sector will deal with it, and it could be even worse for those that own their own business... not better.

2. I am done with school... no more degrees for me, 3 is enough. I think a quarantine might be a chance to learn more important things than are taught in schools anyway.

3. Screw the mail and don't open the doors

I think by the time it becomes evident there is a pandemic, everyone will understand.

I think pandemic is the second most likely large disaster I might face in my area. The first being economic collapse... at least the rest of it.

Offline PlunjProtection

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Re: Pondering government-enforced quarantine issues...
« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2012, 07:51:11 PM »
This is really a question of the scope of the quarantine.  They can't tell the whole country or an entire state to stay in their homes.  People are necessary to keep society going.

I just finished The Great Influenza, which I may post a writeup of at some point. I've tended not to post summaries but only deliver to specific individuals.  But if helpful I will do so.  In any event, the book talks about the quarantines were generally limited to no public gatherings, like church and similar public events.  It should be noted that many jurisdictions were slow or did not warn as they should have.  People generally quarantined themselves for fear of catching the flu.  That makes a lot of sense to me, especially given the severity and potential consequences of a serious epidemic.  Some stores only sold through the door.  Others closed altogether.  I anticipate many grocery stores would stay open but services and products would be limited due to supply problems or lack of workers due to sickness, death or simply not showing up.  People would wear masks and be very cautious.  I don't think the government has the resources to simply drive to neighborhoods or even local points to deliver food.