Author Topic: Diabetes and Food Preps  (Read 2928 times)

Offline Serellan

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Diabetes and Food Preps
« on: October 12, 2008, 11:34:57 PM »
I, like many people, am a Diabetic.  I was diagnosed about a year ago, and am actually doing great through diet control and medication (luckily no insolin, at least not yet).  However, because of my dietary restrictions, I mainly eat meats, cheeses, and green veggies.  I have to keep carbs to a minimum, espcially sugar carbs.  The only time I can have items high in carbs in when they are correspondingly high in fiber (something like all-bran cereal).  I pretty much cut out all pastas and starches.

Anyways, for short term events, It's not that big of a deal.  It wont kill me to go off diet for a week while dealing with an emergency (as long as I don't go crazy, I'll be trading my MRE poundcake for my wife's crackers).  But thinking longer term, I struggle with thinking what kinds of food to stock.  I was considering canned meat and veggies, but that is a lot of $$, space, and weight.  I was also considering dehydrated veggies.

Thoughts, Ideas, suggestions?
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Offline susan1957

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Re: Diebetic Food Storage
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2008, 07:43:18 PM »
I'm working on the same thing because I too am pre-diabetic.  I too eat more green vegetables, meat, and try and cut out carbs unless it's wholegrains.  I also eat for snacks walnuts and some dried fruits in limited quanities.
I have found walking and exercise will allow grace for slipups. 


Offline creuzerm

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Re: Diebetic Food Storage
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2008, 11:19:14 PM »
Maybe the best food storage in this instance would be to 'live' food storage.

A garden.
Small animals like chickens.

All the low carb fresh veggies you can eat. And best yet, extra exercise that may help tip the condition back in your favor.

You say you can eat stuff that is high in fiber to offset the carbs, have you looked into home made whole grain baked goods like breads? Home made pastas? You can make stuff that really isn't palatable to the general wonderbread masses, but is still 'healthy' enough for you that you can consume controlled amounts and keep that blood sugar under control?

Maybe invest in a good chest freezer. Yeah, I know when the power goes out, everything in it spoils. You can do solar powered or generator powered.

If there is no gas for the generator, there is no gas for the automobile, so your walking or bikeing everywhere anyhow.

I am no expert, so research it and correct me if I am wrong, but with that level of activity, your system could probably handle a bit more of the carbs if you manage the intake of them.
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Re: Diebetic Food Storage
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2008, 10:29:18 AM »
As a Type 2 diabetic myself and having advanced knowledge of this disease (I am a medical school professor) there are certain things you need to think about:

In the event of long term SHTF many (most?) of us will exist on reduced caloric intake resulting in weight loss. As diabetics lose weight the hyperglycemia (glucose values) will decline and the need for meds will also decline. This is why you'll need to check your blood glucose and tailor your drug intake to the reduced glucose levels. Many type 2 diabetics develop life threatening HYPOGLYCEMIA (low glucose) after weight loss unless meds are adjusted.

Here is what I do:
- Stockpile your medications where possible. Metformin and glyburide are very stable and effective even beyond the labelled expiration dates. Januvia, Byetta, and Avandia have shorter lifespan.  Talk to your physician; check your medical insurance to see if they pay for 90 day supplies (many don't!). Store in airtight containers with oxygen absorbers.

- Keep your glucose meter up to date and supplies current. You want to continue testing.

- Stockplle canned meats (chicken, tuna and salmon). Get some packed in oil (about 1/3) and the rest in water. Excellent rations when combined with canned veggies in water. The high sodium in those canned foods wlll be needed. Whole grains are the best choice for carbohydrates.

- Vitamin supplements. Buy them at Costco and don't open them.
 
- Diabetics should plan for 50% more water per day for at least 60 days.

streakr



 

Offline DarkEyes

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Re: Diebetic Food Storage
« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2008, 07:12:04 PM »
Thanks for passing that info along.  My Dad and husband are diabetic.  Recently, my Dad has not been eating as much, says he has lost his appetite.  His blood sugar has dropped dangerously low twice, (he takes insulin shots) resulting in an ambulance ride to the hospital. I'm going to call him and read this to him.
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Offline ebonearth

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Diabetic Food Storage: The Power of Inulin
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2009, 07:46:14 PM »
I went to look up Sunchoke growing methods and I came across the fact that it contained inulin. For those unfamiliar with inulin:

From Wikipedia - Inulins are a group of naturally occurring polysaccharides (several simple sugars linked together) produced by many types of plants. They belong to a class of fibers known as fructans. Inulin is used by some plants as a means of storing energy and is typically found in roots or rhizomes. Most plants which synthesize and store inulin do not store other materials such as starch. Inulin is used increasingly in foods because it has unusual nutritional characteristics. Its flavour ranges from completely bland to subtly sweet (approx. 10% sweetness of sugar/sucrose). It can be used to replace sugar, fat, and flour. This is particularly advantageous because inulin contains a third to a quarter of the food energy of sugar or other carbohydrates and a sixth to a ninth of the food energy of fat. It also increases calcium absorption and possibly magnesium absorption, while promoting the growth of intestinal bacteria. Nutritionally, it is considered a form of soluble fiber and is sometimes seen as a prebiotic. The consumption of large quantities (particularly by sensitive or unaccustomed individuals) can lead to gas and bloating.

Inulin has a minimal impact on blood sugar, and—unlike fructose—is not insulemic and does not raise triglycerides, making it generally considered suitable for diabetics and potentially helpful in managing blood sugar-related illnesses...Inulin is indigestible by the human enzymes ptyalin and amylase, which are adapted to digest starch. As a result, inulin passes through much of the digestive system intact. It is only in the colon that bacteria metabolise inulin, with the release of significant quantities of carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and/or methane. Inulin-containing foods can be rather gassy, particularly for those unaccustomed to inulin, and these foods should be consumed in moderation at first.

There are three types of dietary fiber; soluble, insoluble, and resistant starch. Insoluble fiber increases the movement of materials through the digestive system and increases stool bulk; it is especially helpful for those suffering from constipation or stool irregularity. Soluble fiber dissolves in water to form a gelatinous material. Some soluble fibres may help lower blood cholesterol and glucose levels. Inulin is considered a soluble fiber.

Because normal digestion does not break inulin down into monosaccharides, it does not elevate blood sugar levels and may therefore be helpful in the management of diabetes. Inulin also stimulates the growth of bacteria in the gut. Inulin passes through the stomach and duodenum undigested and is highly available to the gut bacterial flora. This makes it similar to resistant starches and other fermentable carbohydrates. This contrasts with proprietary probiotic formulations based on lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in which the bacteria have to survive very challenging conditions through the gastrointestinal tract before they are able to colonize the gut.


Plants that contain high concentrations of inulin include:
    * Elecampane (Inula helenium)
    * Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)
    * Wild Yam (Dioscorea spp.)
    * Sunchokes/Sunroot aka Jerusalem artichokes (Helianthus tuberosus)
    * Chicory (Cichorium intybus)
    * Jicama (Pachyrhizus erosus)
    * Burdocks (Arctium lappa) or (Arctium minus)
    * Onion (Allium cepa)
    * Garlic (Allium sativum)
    * Agave (Agave spp.)
    * Yacón (Smallanthus sonchifolius spp.)

So for those of you with diabetes, metabolic disorder (pre-diabetes) or someone in your family with this condition I recommend slowly incorporating inulin-rich vegetables into your survival garden and diet. Sunroots are excellent 'fauxtato chips' and taste divine roasted or mashed. Enjoying some New Orleans Chicory Coffee (roasted chicory root mixed with coffee grounds which will also extend your coffee stores) with a little agave nectar tastes lovely without the sensation of having to 'eat fake stuff' just to regulate your blood sugar. I like dipping strawberries in agave nectar myself. The 'weed' I am currently battling in my future herb garden is none other than common burdock, which apparently is prized by Italian-Americans for its young stems which apparently taste just like the difficult to grow Cardoon, so much so they call it Cardooni. So that's another way of enjoying an inulin-rich food. Enjoy and stay healthy!
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Offline Sister Wolf

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Re: Diebetic Food Storage
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2009, 08:25:49 PM »
Oh man, I LOVE chicory coffee!  Reminds me of my daddy (who seems to be drinking it every single time I picture him ;) )

I've never heard of sunroot though!  How exciting to learn about a new veggie!  Specially one that can be mashed, or cut into chips!  :D


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Re: Diebetic Food Storage
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2009, 08:39:07 PM »
Good post Streakr.


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Offline ebonearth

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Re: Diebetic Food Storage
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2009, 09:18:58 PM »
I've never heard of sunroot though!  How exciting to learn about a new veggie!  Specially one that can be mashed, or cut into chips!  :D
Sunchoke/Sunroot/Jerusalem Artichoke is just an awesome plant. I cheaped out and purchased them at my Co-Op and what I did not eat I am planting. By the way, despite its name, the Jerusalem artichoke has no relation to Jerusalem, and it is not a type of artichoke, though they are in the same family. The name Jerusalem is due to folk etymology; when the Jerusalem artichoke was first discovered by Europeans it was called Girasole, the Italian word for sunflower. The Jerusalem artichoke is a type of sunflower, in the same genus as the garden sunflower Helianthus annuus. Over time the name Girasole transformed into Hierusalem and then to Jerusalem (Source: Wikipedia).
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Re: Diebetic Food Storage
« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2009, 09:45:36 PM »
I, like many people, am a Diabetic.  I was diagnosed about a year ago, and am actually doing great through diet control and medication (luckily no insolin, at least not yet).  However, because of my dietary restrictions, I mainly eat meats, cheeses, and green veggies.  I have to keep carbs to a minimum, espcially sugar carbs.  The only time I can have items high in carbs in when they are correspondingly high in fiber (something like all-bran cereal).  I pretty much cut out all pastas and starches.

Anyways, for short term events, It's not that big of a deal.  It wont kill me to go off diet for a week while dealing with an emergency (as long as I don't go crazy, I'll be trading my MRE poundcake for my wife's crackers).  But thinking longer term, I struggle with thinking what kinds of food to stock.  I was considering canned meat and veggies, but that is a lot of $$, space, and weight.  I was also considering dehydrated veggies.

Thoughts, Ideas, suggestions?

Congrats on keeping it in check!  I know it is pricy, but I definately think that keeping freeze dried meat available is the way to go.  Emergency Essentials has a pretty good variety and it keeps for a vary long time.  This makes it so you can focus on your day to day requirments without having to rotate the food out for years.   It's an investment that is pretty important in the scheme of things.

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Offline Heavy G

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Diabetes and Food Preps
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2009, 08:50:04 AM »
I have a question on type 2 diabetes and food preps.

(This is different than the type 1 thread in Field Medicine and First Aid.  This question is aimed at food preps.)

One of my best friends, and a guy I plan on inviting to my BOL if SHTF because I trust him and he has some good skills, is a slight type 2 diabetic.  Type 2 is the kind where you don't need insulin, as I understand it.  He takes a little medication but with some moderate weight loss and diet modifications like no refined sugar and not much flour or potatoes he's in the near normal range on blood sugar.  One grain he can eat is oatmeal because it releases its sugars more slowly.

That got me thinking about my stored food.  I have lots and lots of cheap and easy to store food in vacuum sealed bags.  Like pancake mix, mashed potatoes, white corn grits, and pasta.  He shouldn't eat that stuff.  I have some oatmeal and could get more of that (it's cheap, stores well, and is easy to prepare and that slow-release sugar thing means it will last you several hours).

Then I thought about weight loss.  He has a few more pounds to go. If SHTF, weight loss will be common.  He doesn't depend on the medicine, in fact he might ask his doctor if can go off them since he's at near normal levels now.  So I'm thinking he could have moderate amounts of flour and potatoes but I should have some more oatmeal.  Besides, if SHTF and pancakes and potatoes are the only option, eating is more important than mild blood sugar elevations.

Do you have any thoughts on this?  Do you know of some other easily stored diabetes-friendly foods besides oatmeal?

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Re: Diabetes and Food Preps
« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2009, 12:21:23 PM »
all whole grains release their gluten and toses(fruictose, sucrose)  at a much slower rate due to the longer time it takes to digest.  be sure to get whole grain oats not rolled oats or oatmeal.  significantly longer storage life.

Offline Serellan

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Re: Diabetes and Food Preps
« Reply #12 on: July 27, 2009, 12:41:36 PM »
Topic moved.

Back on topic:

I am a Type II Diabetic.  I'm lucky in that it was caught VERY early (I get blood tests every 6 months for another condition and they caught it) I'm currently on oral meds (metformin), but very close to be reduced or removed from it because my levels are under control by my diet.  I am VERY strict about my diet, as luckily it goes well with my temperment.  I am very strict on carbs.

They key with eating carbs (including sugars) as a diabetic is both the type of carbs and what you eat with them.  I was advised (and never do), to never eat a carbs by themselves without protien.  Also, fiber "negates" carbs when over 5 g per serving, so foods high in fiber are great too.  So if I need to eat a piece of toast, put peanut butter on it (and I eat fiber-fortified bread).   Of course I don't eat candy/chocolate/sweets at all (although I did have a single white chocolate chip for dessert last night, man that was heavenly!).

In my food preps I have accepted the fact that a lot of storage food simply won't be good for me.  Things like Mountain House and MRE's, tend to be high in sugars in carbs in order to provide lightweight energy, and protiens are heavy.  I try to balance this by putting away items that are protien heavy (chilis, beans, canned chicken, beef stews) to help balance these out.  Unfortunetly what I eat in my daily diets (meat, cheese, specialty high-fiber breads & tortiallas, fresh greens) don't store very well.  I'll just have to make due.

The good news is that in a SHTF scenario, it won't really kill you to go off diet TOO much for a few weeks.  If I get taken off my meds, I will keep a reserve of them and refresh them every once in a while so that if something DOES happen, I can reutilize the meds to reduce the impact of going off-diet.  This doesn't mean that you gorge yourself on pizza and chocolate cake during SHTF, but if you have to eat rice (normally a no-no), well then so be it.  It might shave a few years off your life in the long run, but it's better than starving now.
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Offline HelenWheels

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Re: Diabetes and Food Preps
« Reply #13 on: July 27, 2009, 01:53:26 PM »
I was wondering if referring to the Glycemic Index for food would help you make some more informed food storage provisions.

http://www.diabetesnet.com/diabetes_food_diet/glycemic_index.php

Serellan, have you seen the entry that was posted in another forum regarding using cheese wax to save blocks of cheese? I'm copying the link from that post here: http://preparednesspro.wordpress.com/2009/03/27/cheese-wax-will-save-us-all-2/

Perhaps that would be a good way to get some of that type of protein in your diet when you're eating from your stores. I just got some cheese wax and plan on trying it to see how it does.
      

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Re: Diabetes and Food Preps
« Reply #14 on: July 27, 2009, 09:15:06 PM »
Balance is the key for any diabetic.  Protein & veggies are a big thing to consider stocking up on.  Do up some canned chicken or turkey to have on hand.  Also tuna is great. 


Offline Serellan

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Re: Diabetes and Food Preps
« Reply #15 on: July 31, 2009, 12:33:31 PM »
Merged with older topic.
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