Armory, Self Defense, And EDC > Black Powder and Primitive Weapons

Gun confiscation, are blackpowder rifles exempt?

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LdMorgan:

--- Quote from: Mr. Bill on December 08, 2012, 10:28:44 PM --- :rofl:

Wanted: smokeless black powder substitute!

--- End quote ---


May I direct you to Aisle 5 and the shelf with all the large containers of guncotton?

AKA Nitrocellulose, cellulose nitrate, flash paper, flash cotton, flash string and/or xyloïdine.

Cheap, easy to make, and about six times more powerful than black powder. If they could make it by accident in 1846, we should be able to make it on purpose in 2013.

Survivors all say it's not nearly as sensitive as other people would say.

If they could.

Nitrocellulose was actually the first form of smokeless gunpowder.

Unfortunately, it was not as stable as we are.



Jim H:

--- Quote from: LdMorgan on January 17, 2013, 09:50:55 PM ---
May I direct you to Aisle 5 and the shelf with all the large containers of guncotton?

AKA Nitrocellulose, cellulose nitrate, flash paper, flash cotton, flash string and/or xyloïdine.

Cheap, easy to make, and about six times more powerful than black powder.

--- End quote ---

The "six times more powerful than black powder" part would seriously worry me if I were planning to use it in a muzzleloader. Seen the remains of a cap lock that blew up with modern powder, amazed the guy only lost a hand and an eye and wasn't killed.

KeithH:

--- Quote from: clayfarmer on December 06, 2012, 03:16:15 PM ---If we ever got to the point where gun confiscation became a reality, wouldn't it make sense to have a few blackpowder rifles (since they don't have to be registered) and all the supplies needed to shoot and maintain them?  Never really thought of this until a few minutes ago, so I'm thinking out loud here.

I wouldn't want to be left without a way to defend myself and take game.  They're relatively inexpensive, powder and balls/bullets are cheap.  And they're a lot of fun to shoot.

How long does powder store under dark, dry, cool conditions?  I would assume indefinitely but I don't know.  If I wanted to buy a case of Pyrodex to store long term, does it have a shelf life?

--- End quote ---

I can't answer for the USA, as I live in Australia, but here the only guns not registered are antiques, & those we are not allowed to use!!!
I have never used pyrodex, but Black Powder I think will keep for ever. The only muzzle-loaders worth having for survival purposes are flintlocks, they are sustainable, where as percussions are not. Pyrodex is I am told no good for priming a flintlock.
Advantages of a Flintlock Muzzle-loader.
1)   Ammo is less expensive than a modern equivalent calibre firearm.
2)   The smoothbore is very versatile, being able to digest round ball, bird shot, & buckshot, or any combination of two of these (can also use minies/conical slugs).
3)   The fusil is lighter to carry than a modern equivalent sized gun.
4)   You can vary the load if needs be.
5)   The smoothbore will digest other projectiles besides lead.
6)   Lead can be retrieved from downed game & remoulded with a simple mould & lead ladle. This means that you can carry less lead, & more of the lighter gunpowder.
7)   You can make your own gunpowder.
8)   You can use the lock to make fire without using gunpowder.
9)   You can use gunpowder for gunpowder tinder fire lighting if needs be.
10)    IF the lock should malfunction (these are very robust & it is not likely) you can easily repair it if you are carrying a few spare springs & a few simple tools.
11)   If you do not have any spare parts & the lock malfunctions, you can easily convert it to a tinderlock or matchlock & continue using it.
12)   You do not need a reloader, brass shells, caps, or primers. The latter have been known to break down in damp conditions or if they are stored for too long.
13)    Wadding for ball or shot is available from natural plant materials or homemade leather or rawhide.
14)   Less chance of being affected by future ammunition control legislation.
15)   Gunpowder is easily obtainable providing you have a muzzle-loader registered in your name regardless of calibre (NSW).
16)    A .32 caliber flintlock rifle is more powerful than a .22 rimfire, less expensive to feed, more accurate over a greater distance, able to take small & medium sized game, & other than not being able to use shot (unless it is smoothbore), it has all the attributes of the other flintlocks. For larger game you can load with conical slugs, which of course you can make yourself in the field.
17)   Damage from a .62 calibre or .70 calibre pistol or long arm is in the extreme. Wounded prey is unlikely to escape.
18)    By using buck & ball you are unlikely to miss your target. This load is capable of taking out more than one target.
19)    There is less kick-back to a muzzle-loading gun.
20)    Antique Flintlock muzzle-loading guns do not require a license, registration, or a permit to purchase in NSW Australia.
Keith.



LvsChant:
Thanks for the post, Keith. Glad to have you here...

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