Author Topic: My day hike FAK  (Read 1905 times)

Offline fritz_monroe

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My day hike FAK
« on: December 21, 2012, 01:55:12 PM »
We go on some day hikes as a family and my son and I have been volunteering to do work at the local state park.  We are there for a couple of hours on a Saturday each month.  I carry a bag with me and always had some first aid items in it, but not really much.  After seeing Heavy G's canteen cover FAK, I decided that it was time to put together a little better kit for in my day pack.

I was going through some boxes in the basement and stumbled upon this belt pouch.  I'll likely paint a big red cross on it to ID it for a FAK.


I gathered together a lot of the items that I think I'll need in this kit.

  • New Skin liquid bandage
  • cling gauze
  • 2" gauze wrap
  • 1" first aid tape
  • Sharpie with duct tape around it
  • Tylenol & Advil
  • 2 blades (these are pretty sharp, but won't last long)
  • Dramamine
  • alergy tablets
  • assorted bandaids
  • Insect repellent wipes
  • WoundSeal quick clotting powder
  • hand lotion
  • baggie of 4x4, 3x3 & 2x2 gauze pads
  • alcohol swabs
  • Neosporin packets
  • Sting relief wipes
  • Poison Ivy after contact cleaning wipes
  • Safety pins (not shown)
  • Inexpensive head lamp (not shown)

I had all of this on hand.  I still want to add some additional items.

  • EMT snips
  • Instant cold compress
  • electrolyte packets
  • burn ointment
  • tweezers
  • Benedryl
  • moleskin

I'm open for any recommendations.  But please keep in mind that I don't know how to use a field trauma kit.  I also will be using this within a couple of miles of rescue, so don't see myself doing things like suturing wounds.
F_M
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Offline endurance

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2012, 02:49:03 PM »
Looks like you have the bases covered.  I might ditch the standard 1" first aid tape and go with either 2" cloth tape or 1.5" Leukotape.  The most common thing you'll encounter is twisted/sprained ankles and watching a good video on how to properly tape an ankle can make the difference between a Search and Rescue to get someone back to the trailhead and having them walk out under their own power.

Looks like a well thought out kit.
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Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2012, 03:20:33 PM »
So, what's this Leukotape?  It sounds like it's some sort of self stick tape.  That one roll of gauze is the cling wrap tape stuff.  That first aid tape is the cloth type.  I hate the plastic tape junk.
F_M
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Offline endurance

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2012, 05:04:32 PM »
So, what's this Leukotape?  It sounds like it's some sort of self stick tape.  That one roll of gauze is the cling wrap tape stuff.  That first aid tape is the cloth type.  I hate the plastic tape junk.
It's physical therapy tape with a variety of uses.  Doesn't seat off, but not necessarily the best thing for a full ankle, but good for slight strains to add stability.

I prefer 2" cloth tape but you're right, anything beats plastic or paper tape. 

I tend to avoid gauze rolls because of the space they take up in a kit, but they are practical.  I've gone to just carrying a 6" piece of Tubular bandage to hold dressings in place.  That said, I carry a very minimalist FAK when I hike.  90% of the time I go into it looking for bandaids and tweezers.  The rest of the time it's for tape, almost always for equipment repair rather than skin repair. ;)
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Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2012, 05:43:34 PM »
I'll take a look at the tubular bandages.  I'm sure they take up a lot less space than the gauze rolls.
F_M
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Offline Bolomark

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2012, 02:40:30 PM »
Baby aspirin for cardiac emergency?
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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2012, 01:25:12 AM »
Looks like you have the bases covered.  I might ditch the standard 1" first aid tape and go with either 2" cloth tape or 1.5" Leukotape.  The most common thing you'll encounter is twisted/sprained ankles and watching a good video on how to properly tape an ankle can make the difference between a Search and Rescue to get someone back to the trailhead and having them walk out under their own power.

Are you actually talking about sportstapes?
It is said they stick better too.

how one uses these?
http://www.amazon.com/BSN-Cover-Roll-Stretch-Adhesive-Bandage/dp/B0015TB9XC/ref=pd_bxgy_bt_text_y

Any link to a stack on videw on taping a sprain?
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Offline endurance

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2012, 09:55:32 AM »
Are you actually talking about sportstapes?
It is said they stick better too.

how one uses these?
http://www.amazon.com/BSN-Cover-Roll-Stretch-Adhesive-Bandage/dp/B0015TB9XC/ref=pd_bxgy_bt_text_y

Any link to a stack on videw on taping a sprain?
Leukotape is fairly new to me but comes highly recommended from a source I trust.  I bought a roll recently and it seems thinner but more rigid than the tape I currently use Cloth athletic tape.  As for properly taping an ankle, this youtube video is about as close as I've found the the method I learned in my college class (Care and Treatment of the Injured Athlete).  The stirrups, horse shoes, and heel locks are everything.  I don't use a base layer (it's basically there to prevent pulling hair off the skin and protect the skin from frequent taping, but does nothing to making a more stable tape job), just 3 stirrups, 2-3 horse shoes, 1-2 heel locks in each direction, then I figure 8 the from bottom to top, using care not to go too tight on the foot.  In the end it's nearly as rigid as a plaster cast and so long as it's not broken and just a serious sprain, you'll be able to walk on it. 

One note, if you're not experienced like the guy in the video, it really helps to pre-cut the lengths you need for the stirrups and horse shoes.  Doing this on yourself is a lot harder than doing it on someone else, but I would have missed my flight home when I did the Portland Marathon if it weren't for taping my ankle well enough so I could walk out of the hotel, get in a cab, and be able to walk to my gate.  Sometimes you've gotta do what you've gotta do. 

Also, the tape you posted is elastic.  Elastic wraps, marketed as "Ace Bandages" in the US are not for true support, they're for compression and faux support.  You need rigid stabilization to make the limb usable again.  Without it, you won't be able to walk out.

My hiking kits are minimalist, so I'm hardly one to judge anyone else's contents.  I carry what I think I need and nothing more:


Contents:


Which works with the rest of my kit:

(by the way, when taking these pics I noticed that at some point I'd taken out my water purification.  While I usually hike with an in-line Sawyer 121 on my camelbak, that's not always the case; I always intend to have some backup form of purification and so now there's both a filter straw and a bottle of iodine tablets.  I also noticed that my roll of tape had made its way out of the kit and put that back in.  I sometimes trust these kits to be complete since I transfer them from pack to pack, but stuff happens.)

Which contains:


Another kit I have I wrap tape on the outside of the plastic shell (both duct and cloth):


This is my complete trail running kit, sometimes with a first aid addendum, other times without (sometimes I'm on trails that get traffic every day of the week, sometimes I'm on trails that only get weekend travel):

In addition to the above contents, I also have my EDC 3.1" folding knife and either CR123 flashlight (either my Quark 123mini or Sunwayman V10R) or my AAA Fenix LD01.  My LD01 is becoming my go to headlamp since I always run with a hat and you can reverse the clip so it will clip right onto the brim.  The mid-beam is perfect for most trail running and gives you 3.5 hours of light on a single AAA battery, but 27 hours on the lowest setting (or an hour on the highest setting).  Looking at this kit now I noticed that I haven't put a spare AAA battery in it yet, but certainly need to.  It's also winter now, so I can certainly take out the tube of bug dope for the next four months. (clear plastic kit contents here

If I was hiking with kids or a large group, I'd definitely pack a bigger kit and include things like an epi-pen, but 60-80% of the time I hike alone, the remainder with my wife or one of a couple good buddies who are not allergic to anything and not accident prone.  Again, my wife has been a runner for years longer than me, but can't for the life of her figure why I carry anything but a water bottle, maybe a headlamp.  She's right until one day when it's clear she was wrong. ;)
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Online GreekMan

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2012, 10:55:09 AM »
endurance, thanks for brinign mya ttention on the taping techniques.
Somehow this was missing from any First Aid class I have taken (mayvbe it is counter-FA-philosphy)

But if you are stranded and you MUST go on some tape and some NSAIDs may be the savious of the day.

So Now I have new plans for my first aid kit.
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Offline endurance

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2012, 04:11:35 PM »
endurance, thanks for brinign mya ttention on the taping techniques.
Somehow this was missing from any First Aid class I have taken (mayvbe it is counter-FA-philosphy)
...
I've taken just about every first aid class there is here in the US: American Red Cross Basic First Aid, American Red Cross Advanced First Aid, First Responder, and Emergency Medical Technician-Basic.  Not one of them talked about taping.  It was only a college class which is the first class in the Certified Athletic Trainer program that covered diagnosis and treatment for strains and sprains.  I think most First Aid classes are just so focused on making sure you go seek advanced medical care rather than trying to diagnose and treat yourself that they fail to give you the useful information you need.

I also learned and practiced taping wrists and she talked about taping knees for various injuries, but we never practiced.  I'd suggest searching youtube to familiarize yourself with that information plus reducing a dislocated shoulder.  While you have to be very certain about a dislocated shoulder and you can cause more damage, if you're many hours from advanced medical care, it may very well be worth a try.  Some dislocations can actually threaten the loss of the limb due to constricted bloodflow, but regardless, the longer it takes to get back in place, the more the ligaments and tendons stretch and the longer it will take to achieve a full recovery.  To me, if I was 3-4 hours from a hospital, I'd probably risk it.   
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Online GreekMan

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2012, 05:59:45 PM »
I am looking into it. I have already downloaded some videos in "regualr" for and .3gp for my mobile.
once the holidays are over and out guests leave i will start taping myself..LOL
I intent to use shrinkwrap and masking tape to save on the cost...
Many eyars ago i ahd a very bad sprain like the ones the basketballers get when they land on the opponts feet and twist their ankles. It necessitated a cast but the rookie doc at the ER let me loose wiht an elastic abndage.
Ever since i feel the ligament is "loose". ocassionaly i will strain it, but I ahve never sprianed it again. it is sensitive to side slopes though.
good to have a backup plan.
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Online GreekMan

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2012, 06:24:42 AM »
...and I ahve a question on taping.
how does it combine with the resulting swelling by a sprain?
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Offline endurance

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #12 on: December 29, 2012, 08:12:25 AM »
...and I ahve a question on taping.
how does it combine with the resulting swelling by a sprain?
swelling is controlled by compression, but you do need to keep an eye on bloodflow.  Any blueness, loss of capillary refill, change in sensation and you need to remove and rewrap.
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Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2012, 12:55:06 PM »
Endurance, back to the ankle taping.  So that 1 1/2" tape would be fine for taping up an ankle?  That would be the most likely injury that I'd encounter with the family on a hiking trip.  I'll have to practice taping up an ankle.  That guy in the video goes pretty quick and I'm sure there is no substitute for experience.
F_M
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Offline endurance

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2012, 02:31:32 PM »
Endurance, back to the ankle taping.  So that 1 1/2" tape would be fine for taping up an ankle?  That would be the most likely injury that I'd encounter with the family on a hiking trip.  I'll have to practice taping up an ankle.  That guy in the video goes pretty quick and I'm sure there is no substitute for experience.
Yep, it's what I've used.   I haven't used the Leukotape yet.

Just be aware if you practice taping with anybody, make sure they're not hairy, because they won't be after you use it. ;)
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Online GreekMan

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #15 on: December 29, 2012, 02:52:20 PM »
BTw there is a video on youtube on how to self-tape your ankle
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Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #16 on: December 29, 2012, 03:27:39 PM »
Just be aware if you practice taping with anybody, make sure they're not hairy, because they won't be after you use it. ;)

I'll get some tape and give it a try.  It would be on my son, so ...
F_M
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Offline SteveandTracyinKY

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #17 on: December 29, 2012, 05:07:59 PM »
If your that close to rescue you primarily going to be looking at treating trauma. Look at QuikClot and similar products. I have literally seen one of the QuikClots probably save a guys life.

http://www.quikclot.com/QuikClot-Products/QuikClot%C2%AE-Sport%E2%84%A2.aspx

Also pretty darn neat to have if you need it is a Israeli bandage http://www.amazon.com/Tactical-Trauma-Dressing-Israeli-Bandage/dp/B006BEHD7M

Never seen one used, but watched several demos and they sure would be handy if needed.

I have a Adventure Medical kit that has a detachable trauma bag inside. All I carry in my pack is the trauma kit, the rest stays at base or in the car. The trauma kit is designed to handle emergencies and get you back to your full kit.

Hope that helps.
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Offline dswaim

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #18 on: January 04, 2013, 11:32:56 AM »
I think it is pretty good.  I work as an Athletic Trainer and deal with acute injuries on a regular basis. The couple things I do is limit the different styles bandaids I carry.  I personally like the "knuckle" style bandaids, I use Flex-Band knuckles in all of my kits.  They are great for covering knuckles, of course, but also covering ends of digits, "normal cuts" etc. I love that you carry power flex (self adherent gauze roll). It is great for keeping wounds covered and keeping compression/pressure on said wounds.  One thing I'd think about adding is a SAMs Splint.  It is probably the most versatile, light weight splint, and is not very expensive. Two other things I would add would be an ACE wrap (elastic wrap) and a triangular bandage. Both have many uses other than their obvious.  I have used ACE wraps in emergencies to make slings, splint, etc.  I'm not big on the leuko-tape.  It serves its purpose, but for the price I just keep 1.5" athletic tape (Johnson & Johnson Coach tape).  I keep leuko-tape in my training room, but not in my kit unless I have an athlete the I know specifically needs it for one of the few tape jobs that require it.

Offline endurance

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #19 on: January 04, 2013, 12:28:49 PM »
I think it is pretty good.  I work as an Athletic Trainer and deal with acute injuries on a regular basis. The couple things I do is limit the different styles bandaids I carry.  I personally like the "knuckle" style bandaids, I use Flex-Band knuckles in all of my kits.  They are great for covering knuckles, of course, but also covering ends of digits, "normal cuts" etc. I love that you carry power flex (self adherent gauze roll). It is great for keeping wounds covered and keeping compression/pressure on said wounds.  One thing I'd think about adding is a SAMs Splint.  It is probably the most versatile, light weight splint, and is not very expensive. Two other things I would add would be an ACE wrap (elastic wrap) and a triangular bandage. Both have many uses other than their obvious.  I have used ACE wraps in emergencies to make slings, splint, etc.  I'm not big on the leuko-tape.  It serves its purpose, but for the price I just keep 1.5" athletic tape (Johnson & Johnson Coach tape).  I keep leuko-tape in my training room, but not in my kit unless I have an athlete the I know specifically needs it for one of the few tape jobs that require it.
Thanks for the input, especially on the leukotape.  Guess I'll go back to what is tried and true.
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Offline Polemicturtle

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #20 on: January 11, 2013, 11:45:44 PM »
My 2 cents.  For trauma management I've been switching my kits from Israeli bandages to Olea's Modular bandages where space is limited.  In my vehicle kits I'm adding the modular bandage.  They're inexpensive enough that it didn't hurt my budget to buy extra to train up the family.  I also try to always carry a tourniquet. 

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Offline Polemicturtle

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Re: My day hike FAK
« Reply #21 on: January 12, 2013, 01:18:38 AM »
I guess I left out the "why" in my last post. I've carried Israeli bandages for awhile (a few years I think)   After recent training with both I feel the Olea's gives me a few more options than the Israeli.  Inside the modular section of the bandage  is some plastic for a quick occlusive and rolled gauze for wound packing. So I don't have to immediately reach back into my kit to look for gauze, I already have it near my hands.

I also recently experienced that for me it was much harder to work on my wife than it has ever been to work on myself friends or strangers.  Nothing too horrible, just a gnarly gash but I was surprised to find that my fine motor skills definitely were really diminished, when in much worse situations they hadn't.   So there was a lot of fumbling around.  Just more food for thought.
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