Author Topic: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag  (Read 23348 times)

Offline ag2

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #30 on: January 22, 2013, 09:30:50 PM »
........Neither is rocket science.

Nelson,
I gotta call BS on you there.     :D

Bullet Science.  I like to think it's like rocket science.  Let's see, ....ummm ya gotcha metalurgy, chemistry, and physics. Hopefully to make well-controlled, velocity-making, boomstick and bullet burns.

nelson96

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #31 on: January 22, 2013, 09:36:13 PM »
Nelson,
I gotta call BS on you there.     :D

Bullet Science.  I like to think it's like rocket science.  Let's see, ....ummm ya gotcha metalurgy, chemistry, and physics. Hopefully to make well-controlled, velocity-making, boomstick and bullet burns.

I like that.  We need to add it to the abbreviations thread.

Offline backwoods_engineer

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #32 on: January 24, 2013, 02:39:10 PM »
This has been a great thread.  I too would vote for .30-30 for deer/pigs in Eastern NC, since this is close to where I live, and am familiar with the terrain.

7mm Rem Magnum is an awesome load, but a .30-30 lever action is just so handy.

By the way, I hunt with my AR-15, too :-)

Offline TooMuchGlass

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #33 on: January 27, 2013, 05:51:53 PM »
Well,  I made a decision.

I ended up choosing a Ruger M77 Mark II left-handed bolt action rifle chambered in .270  ;D

After contemplating the decision for weeks, I happened upon this gun in a gun shop. I got a good price on it, scope included, so I decided on it over either of the lever actions because what I really wanted was a bolt action. Plus, it would be at least 6 months before I could get my hands on either one, but I have this one now, so that's 6 months more of practice!

Thanks so much for your input everyone.

nelson96

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #34 on: January 27, 2013, 06:26:43 PM »
Well,  I made a decision.

I ended up choosing a Ruger M77 Mark II left-handed bolt action rifle chambered in .270  ;D

Nice rifle and a great caliber.

Offline ag2

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #35 on: January 27, 2013, 07:14:26 PM »
Well done.
That's the exact same make/model as mine and it's dropped a couple of elk.

I am right-handed.  I have always wanted to try a left-handed model because to me, it makes sense to use the left hand to cycle the bolt, at least when in prone.  Hmmmm......sounds like a good topic for another thread.

Offline TooMuchGlass

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #36 on: January 27, 2013, 07:29:14 PM »
Thanks for the input guys.

I gotta say I'm pretty excited, I'm glad I found a used gun in such good shape! I think the deal was good too- $500 bucks tax included and it came with a  Bushnell's Sportview 3-9 scope ( nothing special, but it's a set of crosshairs anyway).

Offline 16onRockandRoll

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #37 on: January 27, 2013, 08:38:44 PM »
M77 is a damn nice rifle. .270 is a great caliber. Nice find!

Offline TooMuchGlass

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #38 on: January 28, 2013, 02:18:35 PM »
M77 is a damn nice rifle. .270 is a great caliber. Nice find!

Thanks! Now I'm trying to decide what bullet weight to go with. . . Any suggestions? 130 and 150 are available in my area without too much looking.

Offline ag2

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #39 on: January 28, 2013, 04:10:24 PM »
yeah, buy both.  If you are buying Federal, try out both the blue box and the red box.

I have much tighter groups with the blue box.  There is sometimes a difference.  The "harmonics" as I call it is different for every single rifle.  Figure out what your particular rifle likes and then stock up on it.

Offline hillclimber

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #40 on: January 28, 2013, 05:22:43 PM »
My favotite hunting rifle is my old Ruger M77 "flat bolt" in 308win. Other than my handloads, it likes Winchester ammo. I used to use 180 grain, but I started using 165 grain Noslers a few years ago. They do a good job. I've also had good results with 150grain Hornady as long as they're boat tails.

Some folks don't like the Model77, but I've had mine since highschool, and I have a hard time hunting with anything else. Once I get used to sumpthin' I don't like change. (or so I'm told)

Offline TooMuchGlass

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #41 on: January 28, 2013, 05:40:16 PM »
yeah, buy both.  If you are buying Federal, try out both the blue box and the red box.

I have much tighter groups with the blue box.  There is sometimes a difference.  The "harmonics" as I call it is different for every single rifle.  Figure out what your particular rifle likes and then stock up on it.


I saw Federal at one local shop, but thus far I've only purchased some Fusion ammo 150 grain (it was on sale for 22 down from $30) and I saw some Rem. Corelokts for 23 but they were 130 grain. Federal and Hornady are 30-37 per box.

Anyway, I passed on the Corelokts because I wanted to reduce the number of variables when trying to find out what my gun "likes". I don't really know how to measure my gun's likes and dislikes anyway, apart from smooth cycling and accuracy on the paper down range. Is that all there is to it?

Offline TheRetiredRancher

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #42 on: January 29, 2013, 01:14:00 PM »
Congratulations.  The .270 is perhaps the greatest all around cartridge ever produced.  (I am sure that will bring some replies.)  I used to use 130 grain bullets for all of my shooting needs in .270 win.  My particular rifle (an old model 700 Remington) does not like the long 150 grain bullets.  I consistently get great accuracy and inexpensive ammunition with the standard Remington 130 grain soft points.  I handload so most of my serious shooting these days is with either speer or sierra 130 grain spitzer soft points.  However, for my fun shooting and small varments I load the 90 grain hollow point from speer.  It shoots very flat for about 300 yds before the poor ballistic coefficent of the light bullet takes effect and the bullets begins to drop too fast.  It is also a great way to practice with your big game rifle while shooting rabbits and coyotes.

In answer to your question about how to tell "what your rifle likes" I would say that there are ONLY TWO things that matter.  Accuracy and reliablility.  If you can't get it to feed without jamming your gun does not "like" it.  If it won't hit the target your gun also does not like it.  Once you get past that point you can move on to what will do the best job for which you want to use it, and how much you are swayed by the most recent sales ads from the ammunition companies.  Nothing against the newest trends in ballistic design as there are some great inovations in recent years, just remember that conventional jacketed soft point bullets have killed more deer than all of the newest wonder bullets put together.  However, if you decide to take your .270 elk, moose or bear hunting then it begins to pay to look at the premium bullets.

nelson96

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #43 on: January 29, 2013, 06:14:37 PM »
For a high-end cartridge to try, I highly recommend the Hornady .270 Win 130 GR InterBond┬« Superformance┬«.  It has great ballistics compared to others in its class.  Average cost is $38/Bx.

Offline TooMuchGlass

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #44 on: January 29, 2013, 07:13:49 PM »
Sounds great.
I think I'll start trying to hunt down 130 gr rounds and do my testing with that grain- I plan on hunting deer, and it sounds like that will easily take care of one. I'll just chalk my first purchase of 150 grain bullets up to "hey, they were on sale". And now I have something just in case Endurance gives me a call.  ;D

Offline TooMuchGlass

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #45 on: March 10, 2013, 02:30:55 PM »
Hey all,

I'm in need of a bit of coaching here. The .270 shoots great, I took it to the range last weekend and fired about 15 rounds through it in a couple hours- 5 at 25 and the rest at 100, all from sitting behind a table with a piece of wood on it with a fancy sandbag my father in law has on top of the block of wood.  I was attempting to sight in the scope, but also just get used to the darn thing (this was the first time in my life I had ever fired a rifle). Anyway, the scope is now close, I'll do the fine tuning next trip.

Questions-
1) how long should I wait in between shots, and how important is it?
2) how many rounds does my gun hold? I feel dumb asking, but I'm just not sure. I only ever put one in at a time at the range. Since then, I've put 4 in the internal magazine and was able to negotiate a 5th into the chamber if I held down the top round coming up next. I didn't fire it this way, and will not under any circumstances until I know for certain. Because my rifle is used, it didn't come with a manual. It is a Ruger m77mkII lefty bolt action in .270.

Thanks. If there is anything else I need to know, please tell me.

Offline hillclimber

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #46 on: March 10, 2013, 03:58:56 PM »
My old M77 holds 5 rounds in the magazine. When you close the bolt, it strips off (and chambers) the top round, leaving 4 in the magazine. I can't get 6 rounds into it. Not enough room for the bolt to clear.
Keep in mind, mine is a .308.  The case dia. is the same, it's just a shorter.

Offline ag2

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #47 on: March 11, 2013, 06:50:22 AM »
Hey all,

I'm in need of a bit of coaching here. The .270 shoots great, I took it to the range last weekend and fired about 15 rounds through it in a couple hours- 5 at 25 and the rest at 100, all from sitting behind a table with a piece of wood on it with a fancy sandbag my father in law has on top of the block of wood.  I was attempting to sight in the scope, but also just get used to the darn thing (this was the first time in my life I had ever fired a rifle). Anyway, the scope is now close, I'll do the fine tuning next trip.

Questions-
1) how long should I wait in between shots, and how important is it?
2) how many rounds does my gun hold? I feel dumb asking, but I'm just not sure. I only ever put one in at a time at the range. Since then, I've put 4 in the internal magazine and was able to negotiate a 5th into the chamber if I held down the top round coming up next. I didn't fire it this way, and will not under any circumstances until I know for certain. Because my rifle is used, it didn't come with a manual. It is a Ruger m77mkII lefty bolt action in .270.

Thanks. If there is anything else I need to know, please tell me.

http://www.ruger.com/search/group/?cat=left
http://www.ruger.com/products/m77MarkIITarget/models.html
Click on extras, then click on user manual.

My markII is chambered in 7mm Rem Mag.  It holds 3 in the trap door and 1 in the chamber.

Offline 16onRockandRoll

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Re: 30-30 vs. 7mm mag
« Reply #48 on: March 11, 2013, 05:49:56 PM »
I usually wait at least 1 minute between shots for zeroing. Leave the bolt open so air can make its way through to help cool it. Some guns are very sensitive to heat buildup, others seem almost unaffected by it. I try to be very consistent while zeroing, and once its dialed in, I'll run them harder so that I know how it behaves with heat.