Author Topic: Interesting article about Feral Hogs from Texas Parks and Wildlife  (Read 1580 times)

Offline archer

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http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/nuisance/feral_hogs/

Introduction
group of hogs

Early Spanish explorers probably were the first to introduce hogs in Texas over 300 years ago. As colonization increased, hog numbers subsequently increased. They provided an important source of cured meat and lard for settlers.

During the fight for Texas independence as people fled for safety into the United States or Mexico, many hogs escaped or were released. It was not until the mid 1800s when hostilities between the United States and Mexico ended that settlers once again began bringing livestock back into Texas. The livestock included hogs that ranged freely. Many escaped, contributing to the feral population.

In the 1930s, European wild hogs, "Russian boars," were first imported and introduced into Texas by ranchers and sportsmen for sport hunting. Most of these eventually escaped from game ranches and began free ranging and breeding with feral hogs. Because of this crossbreeding, there are very few, if any, true European hogs remaining in Texas.

Feral hogs are unprotected, exotic, non-game animals. Therefore, they may be taken by any means or methods at any time of year. There are no seasons or bag limits, however a hunting license and landowner permission are required to hunt them.

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read more at link above.

Offline TexasGirl

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Re: Interesting article about Feral Hogs from Texas Parks and Wildlife
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2013, 10:01:54 AM »
Yep, and no license is needed if shot on your own land.

Despite what many would lead you to believe, free-range feral pork is much healthier to eat than feed lot pork.  It's richer tasting, less fat, no GMO residuals, and carries less diseases.

Somehow the big pork lobby doesn't want people to know this.

~TG