Author Topic: Storing babyfood  (Read 3019 times)

Offline Em2002

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Storing babyfood
« on: April 29, 2013, 03:28:07 PM »
I am a newbie, can recently tried my hand at canning (soup). I make own baby food and  just wondering if anyone tried storing baby food via canning. If not, what method would work best for long term storage and any suggestions for tasty treat also welcomed. 

Offline Freebirde

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Re: Storing babyfood
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2013, 04:18:31 PM »
Not experienced at making baby food, but if you cannot can the processed baby food, you can can most of the things that you use to make it.   If you have access to a dehydrator or freeze drier you can powder the ingredients for "instant" baby food.

Offline mxitman

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Re: Storing babyfood
« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2013, 04:49:53 PM »
I canned a few things for my daughter and now my son who is 6 months, I did a combination of apple/pear sauce mixed with peas, varieties of squash, beans, potatoes & yams. Also kale, carrot and even cooked & blended eggs from our chickens, everything we grew except the yams.

I found with my daughter who is 2 now that the stage where she was eating blended food was a short period and we didn't use it all, So with my son born in Oct I planned ahead and started canning stuff in the fall. Sure makes it easy now for feeding which he is up to around 3 meals of solids a day of around 1/3 to 3/4 cup at each sitting.

Be sure to add in additional fats like avocado, bacon grease or coconut/olive oils when feeding, helps them from getting constipated. I usually do this after heating it up so it melts and blends in, you can do it before canning but it makes the canning more difficult.

Also make sure you label good, I didn't the first time and it was a guessing game on some it after a while...but both have been good eaters, just not good at taking the bottle for me....I'm a stay a home dad

Offline chancebd7

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Re: Storing babyfood
« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2013, 05:35:46 PM »
Hi Em2002
The wife is pregnant with our 3rd and are interested in making our own baby food. Think you could post some recipes here or even start a new thread so we could all share recipes.

Thanks,
 Chance

Offline Nate

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Re: Storing babyfood
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2013, 07:25:48 PM »
I asked my wife the same question if we wanted to store up some homemade baby food.  She said no.  She comes from a non-western culture and holds strong beliefs in food as the key to good health.  Her philosophy is to store the ingredients for our son's baby food instead of storing the finished product.  I relate her thinking about storing his food to the best way to store meat is on the hoof.

So, we stock up on brown rice, garlic, onion, sweet potato, carrot, broccoli, and what ever fresh veggies are on sale.  I will post our basic rice porridge recipe that we make for lunch and dinner four our son.

1 heaping spoonful of washed brown rice
1 chopped garlic clove
1 inch thick slice of a good sized sweet potato (slice the 1 inch round into thinner rounds to cook better)
small cube of meat (pork, chicken or fish)
water to cover everything, you can always add more water.  The important thing is that the porridge is at a slow boil until the meat is cooked, then you can reduce the heat.

The rest of the veggies are added towards the end of cooking and often not all I listed are added to each batch.  This provides some variety in his diet.  Sometimes we will skip the sweet potato and just do broccoli and carrot.  Other times we add asparagus and cauliflower.  We switch it up so he gets different flavors and nutrients.  We did a lot of trial and error to find out how much of each veggie to add.  You will need to do the same with your child.   I told my wife when someday I lose all my teeth I want her to make this for me!

Once all the ingredients have cooked on low heat for at least 2 hours, we transfer it to a coffee mug and blend with a stick blender.  This is then dumped into a standard size rice bowl and spoon fed to him.   Occasionally during cooking, and more often once the veggies are added, some stirring of the porridge is necessary to prevent scorching.

For breakfast he now gets oatmeal mixed with banana and homemade plain yogurt.  Sometimes we will add avocado.  We take old fashioned oats and turn them into a powder in the blender.  We do about 3 TBS of the oatmeal powder mixed with water.  Stir until all the lumps are out and nuke it for a few minutes.  Stir in the pre-mashed banana and avocado.

My wife also breastfeeds in-between meals and before bed.  I highly suggest that you try to breastfeed, and guys support your wives in this.  Trust me, the $$ savings and more importantly the health benefits for your child are well worth any troubles and inconveniences you may experience.

As for storing breastmilk, we put it in the special milk bags and keep them in the deep freezer.  You can also take the whey from fresh breastmilk and make some fermented foods for your child.  My wife made sauerkraut and fermented guacamole (just the avocado mashed up) using her whey.  Our son loved both foods.  I suggest The Complete Idiot's Guide to Fermenting Foodshttp://www.amazon.com/dp/1615641505/?tag=googhydr-20&hvadid=17924739567&hvpos=1t1&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=19173443091010927618&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_7wgx0rbe0h_b as a good starting point for learning how to make fermented foods.

I hope my info is helpful and that I didn't stray too far off topic.

Offline Hestia

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Re: Storing babyfood
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2013, 01:51:29 AM »
I realize I'm a few days late on this topic but I felt compelled to comment.

I would strongly recommend that you consider delaying solids, not just for a SHTF scenario but in general. The fact is that starting our babies on solids at such young ages and in the puree type forms we are used to seeing isn't really "normal" for humans and came about largely with the rise in formula feeding in the late 1800s/early 1900s. Not only is it not necessary to feed young babies purees, but it can be harmful. Babies are not born with the ability to make certain digestive enzymes and exposing their "open gut" to solids can increase the likelihood of food allergies. See http://kellymom.com/nutrition/starting-solids/delay-solids/ for more detailed information. And its not all about age either. There are also certain developmental milestones that should be met before introducing solids. See http://kellymom.com/nutrition/starting-solids/solids-when/.

I did delayed solids with my daughter: started giving here little tastes at 8-9mos and let her gradually start eating more. Never did any purees but rather gave her whatever parts of our meals that she was ready for (could easily chew, etc). She now eats quite a bit and isn't picky in the slightest as well as being 95th percentile height/weight. I say that because I know there is this perception that if we don't give solids that babies will be suffering from lack of nutrition and that is simply not accurate. After six months a baby's body begins to start using up stores of things like iron but the key word there is "begins" -- they still have enough for their needs to last until they are gradually able to begin a diet of adult solid food. Also, to help matters even more you can consider delayed cord clamping which has many potential health benefits. I thought this TED video on the subject was quite exceptional: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cw53X98EvLQ.

Bottom line, with SHTF babies would be far better off breastfeeding as long as possible and then beginning to eat the same things you are so storing baby food really needn't be a concern. I understand not everyone will jump at this idea but I felt compelled to make the suggestion anyway. Also, any women who have not yet breastfed a child should consider purchasing a good book on the subject (I've heard good things about Ina Mae Gaskin's book on the subject) to have on hand just in case. While some women are physically unable to breastfeed, so many more find themselves unable to because of poor advice (or lack thereof) that they received which led them to believe that they were unable or that certain other problems were unavoidable when that really wasn't the case. With SHTF that could be a major issue and every extra bit of good information could mean a world of difference.

Offline mxitman

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Re: Storing babyfood
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2013, 02:51:16 PM »
I would have liked to delay in feeding solids, as for me just giving a bottle is much easier as long as my wife can keep up with her pumping....but my son who is almost 7 months now is nearly the same size as my daughter who is 27 months, he's off the scale in every category and simply can't get enough calories from the breast milk. He got all our big genes as I'm 6-2 and 200lbs and I'm one of the smaller guys on our side of my family, most are 6-4+ and 240+...

I give our kids allot of stuff from our own garden and I even let them eat dirt if they want...it didn't hurt me any ;D

Offline Hestia

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Re: Storing babyfood
« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2013, 09:00:45 AM »
I would have liked to delay in feeding solids, as for me just giving a bottle is much easier as long as my wife can keep up with her pumping....but my son who is almost 7 months now is nearly the same size as my daughter who is 27 months, he's off the scale in every category and simply can't get enough calories from the breast milk. He got all our big genes as I'm 6-2 and 200lbs and I'm one of the smaller guys on our side of my family, most are 6-4+ and 240+...

I give our kids allot of stuff from our own garden and I even let them eat dirt if they want...it didn't hurt me any ;D

Like I said, my daughter is consistently around 95th percentile... she is huge too. My husband is 6'4"/210lbs so sounds like we are working with some similar genes. I remember laughing when people gave us newborn clothes during our pregnancy and just shaking my head cause I knew she was gonna be a big baby. And sure enough she never did fit in them and blew through the 0-3mos stuff in a few weeks. Definitely took people by surprise because most of the people we know have kids around the 30th percentile.

Starting solids too early can actually be associated with slowing growth because breastmilk is more nutrient dense than a lot of the typical first foods. ;) I hear you on the garden though. After we started her on solids we pretty much let her have whatever she wanted and that includes a lot of time playing with dirt. lol