Author Topic: Little tidbits for cooking game meat  (Read 4433 times)

dragonart

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Little tidbits for cooking game meat
« on: October 15, 2008, 07:06:28 AM »
Just sharing some little but flavor-saving things I have learned from handling and cooking game meat...

1.)  "It's Gamey": to prevent a gamey smell and taste, soak it in buttermilk for a few hours.  Buttermilk has an enzyme that breaks down the chemicals in game meat that give it that smell/taste.

2.)  Fish:  you can soak it in cold, mashed watermelon to mask a fishy smell.  Also keep your fish alive as long as possible for fresher taste; a cooler with ice water works great for doing this when you are fishing.  Instead of putting the fish you caught on a leader back in the water, put them in the cooler.  They will still be alive in most cases by the time you get home.

3.)  Fowl:  To remove smaller down feathers from a whole, cleaned/gutted bird, dip it feet first in nearly boiling water for 1-2 minutes, then ice cold water for about a minute.  The feathers will mostly come right off and you can rinse/scrub the rest off easily.

4.)  Buffalo:  cook it very slowly at a low temperature of 300 degrees or less.  Buffalo has a very high moisture content and low fat, so it's important to cook it slow so it doesn't dry out.

5.)  Deer:  if you can, hang the carcass (field dressed) in a cool locker for 10 days, unskinned.  Aging the meat will help to acquire the best taste. If you skin the carcass after it has aged the meat will be moister and will not turn dark.

6.)  Bear:  Remove as much fat as you can from the meat and it is important to freeze or cool it ASAP.  Bear meat goes rancid faster than any game meat.

7.)  Wild Turkey:  Don't baste or stuff it.  And cook it breast-side down, because the breast meat on wild turkey tends to cook faster than the rest of it.  Potatoes and apples around the bird will keep it "propped up" in the pan when baking. 



Offline archer

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Re: Little tidbits for cooking game meat
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2008, 10:00:42 AM »
Thanks for the tips!

Offline DeltaEchoVictor

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Re: Little tidbits for cooking game meat
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2008, 10:22:28 AM »
Good tips there.  Thanks!

jarhead

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Re: Little tidbits for cooking game meat
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2008, 12:09:04 AM »
I am not a hunter, but I am going to learn.  My buddy gave me this site and it has everything.  Enjoy.
http://www.wildgamerecipes.org/

Offline creuzerm

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Re: Little tidbits for cooking game meat
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2008, 08:47:28 PM »
The things I know about regarding Dragonart's tips
Just sharing some little but flavor-saving things I have learned from handling and cooking game meat...

1.)  "It's Gamey": to prevent a gamey smell and taste, soak it in buttermilk for a few hours.  Buttermilk has an enzyme that breaks down the chemicals in game meat that give it that smell/taste.

2.)  Fish:  you can soak it in cold, mashed watermelon to mask a fishy smell.  Also keep your fish alive as long as possible for fresher taste; a cooler with ice water works great for doing this when you are fishing.  Instead of putting the fish you caught on a leader back in the water, put them in the cooler.  They will still be alive in most cases by the time you get home.

5.)  Deer:  if you can, hang the carcass (field dressed) in a cool locker for 10 days, unskinned.  Aging the meat will help to acquire the best taste. If you skin the carcass after it has aged the meat will be moister and will not turn dark.


1, 2) I have read that fish in milk will help with the fishy taste. I have tried it, but I think I like fish too much to really care about any difference. Anyway, I usually have to chase the fish around the boat a couple of times when it comes time to clean them, so they are still quite fresh.

5) Deer - my dad and I skin ours as soon as we get it home. They skin SO much easier warm then after they have froze up. We then wrap them in sheet plastic for the week. Like was stated above, this ages them, and the plastic keeps them from drying out.

 If you have to skin them cold, a tractor with a bucket helps a lot. Hang em upside down from the bucket, start to skin them around the back legs. Then have three BIG dudes grab ahold of the skin and pick the bucket up. Half a ton of hungry hunters with cold fingers will make quick work of skinning a deer. They will peel like a banana.
A saws-all or reciprocating saw with a good long wood blade makes quick work of taking off legs, heads, and horns.
A propane torch will take the stray hairs off of a skun deer. We never have problems with this skinning them warm, but we do skinning them cold.

Eat your venison hot, if you let it get told, it's like chewing on a candle. I am guessing that most people who don't like venison first tried it after it had cooled off some.

Because the venison fat is so tallowie tasting, we always clean up our meat very well - even our grind. It's so lean that we can't cook the venison hamburgers on a grill - it falls apart and into the grill.
We get our ground venison mixed with cheap local ground beef. The cheep beef adds enough fat that the burgers will stick together, and it's still pretty gosh darn cheap for burgers at the end of the day.

SeventhSon

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Re: Little tidbits for cooking game meat
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2008, 07:10:07 AM »
As to Upland Game Birds:
Field dress as soon as possible (check local regs some states require you to transport certain birds intact for ID purposes) to cool the meat down.
Once home soak the meat in cold salt water in the fridge for 24 hours. I like to use a cajun salt based spice like Tony Chachere, it gives the meat some great zing when you cook it. The salt seems to pull the blood out of the meat and it has a superior flavor and texture.

This is just my humble opinion. I was called a cretin last week by some guys I was hunting with because I field dressed my birds. They evidently prefer to hang their birds in their garage "until the head falls off, that's when you know its ready"...  ???
Oh well to each his/her own.