Author Topic: Comms  (Read 22989 times)

leftcoastrightmind

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Comms
« on: September 19, 2008, 10:40:18 AM »
One of the best preps you can make is to become a licensed Amateur radio operator and aquire some equipment.  My suggestion would be to start out with the tech license and work your way up to at least a general license where you can operate on most of the HF bands.  When the Shumer hits, you will be able to communicate with others and ultimately get info from sources other than the "gubment".
« Last Edit: December 03, 2008, 12:19:34 AM by DeltaEchoVictor »

Offline BigDanInTX

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Re: Comms
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2008, 12:21:41 PM »
I am interested in doing this.  There are tons of applications in being a radio operator.

Here's a site for practice tests:
http://www.qrz.com/p/testing.pl

leftcoastrightmind

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Re: Comms
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2008, 01:55:12 PM »
I am licensed ans would be willing to answer any questions or concerns re this essential set of knowledge and skills.
QRZ is what I did.  They offer a set of tests that you can use online.  I did the practice tests for 3 weeks and passed my tech exam 100%

Offline BigDanInTX

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Re: Comms
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2008, 02:29:05 PM »
Awesome!  I'm sure you'll be a huge asset when this forum gets rolling.  Thanks for posting/offering to help others, we do appreciate it.

Elliott

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Re: Comms
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2008, 04:43:01 PM »
That would be great.  I'm looking into it as well.  I found a site that has tons of online practice exams which I am going over along as reading the study guide.  However where I'm going to be concerned with the most is in picking my equipment. 

I don't want professional grade however I do want something that is durable.   

Thanks a lot.

P.S. Ham site with study guide and online tests.

http://www.mecckc.org/

then select "getting started in Ham radido"
then choose "ham class.org"



Offline BigDanInTX

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Re: Comms
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2008, 04:49:01 PM »
Keep the comms links coming.  Also, anyone who may be interested, there's a Communications forum over at Zombie Squad.  People usually post gear questions and reviews there as well.  It could be useful to look at in the interim until we get more "meat" in these forums.  =-]

http://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/viewforum.php?f=42&sid=7b835d984ef1c70b332c2aaf0d3c0959

Offline Master Guns

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Re: Comms
« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2008, 08:02:36 PM »
COMM:
I also feel that becoming a licensed Amateur radio operator (A HAM Radio Operator) is a requirement for the people who wish to be free and survive.

I like Gordon Wests CD's for becoming a Technician Class Operator. (The 1st Level you can study.)
http://www.gordonwestradioschool.com
It can be played as you drive and I know many who can pass the test from just hearing him talk you through the class and his explanations are clear and to the Point.

It is always better to study and to have in depth knowledge of subjects, but in HAM radio you learn more after you get a License.
Many in your local area will be like minded and you can network from that point in many other areas.
Having Communications helps you find like minded people, help others in need, Call for help, and avoid things.

If you need help just ask.

It is a good thing to learn, if times get tough or even if they dont... (Thanks Jack for this Forum!!!)


jeremya

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Re: Comms
« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2008, 10:25:28 PM »
I have my Tech License, but I have yet to get a Radio, but it's on the list.

Dan when you get you license we can have Austin chat on 2-meter.  ;D

-- Jeremy

Offline BigDanInTX

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Re: Comms
« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2008, 10:32:52 PM »
Sweet.  I definitely want to get a handheld rig for broadcast in the field and in a bug-out.  =-]

leftcoastrightmind

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Re: Comms
« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2008, 09:36:13 AM »
I have my Tech License, but I have yet to get a Radio, but it's on the list.

Dan when you get you license we can have Austin chat on 2-meter.  ;D

-- Jeremy

You can use echolink,  It is essentially using your computer for communications.  I have used it and I speak with people from right here in my AO to folks in Glasgow Scottland.  All you need is a good microphone and the software.  Here is the addy for Echolink:  http://www.echolink.org/

  You have to register, and they verify your call sign, but it is a cool tool for those who have not yet purchased any equipment.  Can we upload pics here?

There is another cool tool for VOIP called teamspeak.  Anyone ever used this software?  I used it back in the "Gaming Days".  Works sweet, is slightly better than phone quality, and is cool for group chats.

73's....Bleeeeeeep!!

Offline creuzerm

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Re: Comms
« Reply #10 on: September 22, 2008, 06:11:47 PM »
I think comms are important. Being able to gather and disperse information quickly can save lives. Able to contact people in your group in an emergency, or at the 3rd hour, so your on the road by the 7th hour so your all safe at the 11th hour could be a decisive advantage.

I am working for my amateur radio license.

I have had CB radios for years. They can be cheap - the last one I got I traded a ride to a place I was going anyway for - they can be a 'fad' item for somebody and they dump them cheaply when they get bored. It might be worth picking up a few at garage sales, from friends & coworkers that are tossing them, etc. They run on 12 volts, so can be solar powered, their range is a couple of miles or line of site. They don't require a license - so you can work with them while your getting your radio license. Hang onto an assortment of magnet mount and other antennas. When you need to set up communications with somebody, you pull them out of you metal storage box, toss one into each vehicle or stationary location that needs to communicate.

I have several older handheld CB radios. The telescoping antennas on them make them quite ungainly to use in the woods. Mine take 12 AA batteries, so they are large and heavy and expensive to 'feed' - as the new LSD (low self discharge) NiMH are out, I need to get a couple of sets of batteries for each.  I have been eyeballing the new portable CB radios with the little rubber ducky antennas and build in battery packs. Anybody use one of these?

My 'trucklet' - Ford Escape - has a CB antenna bolted to the roof rack and a glass mount scanner antenna. Unfortunately, this makes the vehicle a bit distinctive looking, three antennas whipping in the wind. I am looking for a very short fiberglass magnet mount antenna that I can stick on the roof and pull the 4 foot steel whip off if I need to go 'stealth' and range isn't as much of an issue. I would have this and also a spare radio (one of the handhelds)  in the trucklet for somebody who doesn't have a radio on their vehicle. A CB doesn't do you any good if the person you want to talk to doesn't have one too.

I have a portable radio (police) scanner. Let me tell you, this is a handy little fella. I have the local police and fire as well as the surrounding municipalities. I also put in the county sheriff, state patrol, inter-agency communications, park service, local hospitals, etc. into the radio on separate 'banks' so I can turn them off most of the time. I have also added the utilities, power and phone so if they are in the area I can keep tabs on where power and phone are in or out of service. I am adding the local mass transit, light rail, city bus, etc. so in case I need to use one of those systems in a pinch I could pre-screen them for any issues. This radio also has the radio alert system in it so I can keep up on bad weather. I try to listen to the radio a couple of nights a month just to keep a 'feel' for what is normal radio traffic in a non-emergency time.

Don't forget your cell phone as a source of 'comms'. While the system can quickly get traffic flooded or be wholly unavailable in an emergency, they can work quite well just a few miles away on a different cell tower. Also, to the best of my knowledge, the data channel and voice channel are separate, so while a voice call may not connect, a SMS or text message may easily get through. In my experience in Florida, landlines can be down for weeks after a storm, while many cell towers may stay up throughout the storm. After the initial panic phone calls subside, they are quite usable. After hurricane Wilma, my power inverter in the vehicle was loaned out for 2 weeks and was charging cell phones 24/7 that hole time.

I have been looking at these little handheld el-cheapo radios for family/camping/hunting use. Chinamart had some for $30 a pair. I am thinking of watching for clearance sales after the holidays, and picking up several sets. If you can find them at $10 a pop, a hundred bucks would provide you with 10 short range radios. That is an awful lot of comms for a little money. If one happens to fall into the drink or get damaged through carelessness, it's not all that big of a financial loss.

Another thing to be said about comms is to practice. I am sure you have a friend/familymember who is the natural 'organizer' of events. They do all the communications and things tend to happen or not happen depending on their involvement. If you practice comms on a day to day basis, you could also become a natural goto person when it hits the fan. If somebody is trying to get a hold of you, it makes it much easier to get ahold of them. This makes it much easier to organize if needed. This also can form an informal 'chain of command', which also makes communication and organization easier.

Just a quick example, I am a bit of a weather bug - got it from my mom. But when bad weather brews, I am on the cell texting my friends that are in the path of the tornado. A quick check in with them after the storm making sure everything is ok and with an offer to help can also help establish that communications relationship.

Offline DeltaEchoVictor

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Re: Comms
« Reply #11 on: September 23, 2008, 12:13:19 AM »
KD0DEV here.  Working on upgrading to the General class now.

The QRZ practice tests Dan listed are a great resource.  Another good resource is Mr. Pugsly & he's found at the following link http://home.comcast.net/%7Emisterpugsly/index.html the tech. & general class notes are printable & allow you to study without having to go & buy the books.  I used the tech. notes along with the QRZ practice exams to pass my tech. test.

I have a ton of links bookmarked if anyone is looking for something in particular.  I'm also setting up a computer to operate echolink on if anyone is interested.  It's not operational yet, but I hope to have it online by the end of October.

leftcoastrightmind

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Re: Comms
« Reply #12 on: September 23, 2008, 08:24:49 AM »
I think comms are important. Being able to gather and disperse information quickly can save lives. Able to contact people in your group in an emergency, or at the 3rd hour, so your on the road by the 7th hour so your all safe at the 11th hour could be a decisive advantage.

I am working for my amateur radio license.

I have had CB radios for years. They can be cheap - the last one I got I traded a ride to a place I was going anyway for - they can be a 'fad' item for somebody and they dump them cheaply when they get bored. It might be worth picking up a few at garage sales, from friends & coworkers that are tossing them, etc. They run on 12 volts, so can be solar powered, their range is a couple of miles or line of site. They don't require a license - so you can work with them while your getting your radio license. Hang onto an assortment of magnet mount and other antennas. When you need to set up communications with somebody, you pull them out of you metal storage box, toss one into each vehicle or stationary location that needs to communicate.

I have several older handheld CB radios. The telescoping antennas on them make them quite ungainly to use in the woods. Mine take 12 AA batteries, so they are large and heavy and expensive to 'feed' - as the new LSD (low self discharge) NiMH are out, I need to get a couple of sets of batteries for each.  I have been eyeballing the new portable CB radios with the little rubber ducky antennas and build in battery packs. Anybody use one of these?

My 'trucklet' - Ford Escape - has a CB antenna bolted to the roof rack and a glass mount scanner antenna. Unfortunately, this makes the vehicle a bit distinctive looking, three antennas whipping in the wind. I am looking for a very short fiberglass magnet mount antenna that I can stick on the roof and pull the 4 foot steel whip off if I need to go 'stealth' and range isn't as much of an issue. I would have this and also a spare radio (one of the handhelds)  in the trucklet for somebody who doesn't have a radio on their vehicle. A CB doesn't do you any good if the person you want to talk to doesn't have one too.

I have a portable radio (police) scanner. Let me tell you, this is a handy little fella. I have the local police and fire as well as the surrounding municipalities. I also put in the county sheriff, state patrol, inter-agency communications, park service, local hospitals, etc. into the radio on separate 'banks' so I can turn them off most of the time. I have also added the utilities, power and phone so if they are in the area I can keep tabs on where power and phone are in or out of service. I am adding the local mass transit, light rail, city bus, etc. so in case I need to use one of those systems in a pinch I could pre-screen them for any issues. This radio also has the radio alert system in it so I can keep up on bad weather. I try to listen to the radio a couple of nights a month just to keep a 'feel' for what is normal radio traffic in a non-emergency time.

Don't forget your cell phone as a source of 'comms'. While the system can quickly get traffic flooded or be wholly unavailable in an emergency, they can work quite well just a few miles away on a different cell tower. Also, to the best of my knowledge, the data channel and voice channel are separate, so while a voice call may not connect, a SMS or text message may easily get through. In my experience in Florida, landlines can be down for weeks after a storm, while many cell towers may stay up throughout the storm. After the initial panic phone calls subside, they are quite usable. After hurricane Wilma, my power inverter in the vehicle was loaned out for 2 weeks and was charging cell phones 24/7 that hole time.

I have been looking at these little handheld el-cheapo radios for family/camping/hunting use. Chinamart had some for $30 a pair. I am thinking of watching for clearance sales after the holidays, and picking up several sets. If you can find them at $10 a pop, a hundred bucks would provide you with 10 short range radios. That is an awful lot of comms for a little money. If one happens to fall into the drink or get damaged through carelessness, it's not all that big of a financial loss.

Another thing to be said about comms is to practice. I am sure you have a friend/familymember who is the natural 'organizer' of events. They do all the communications and things tend to happen or not happen depending on their involvement. If you practice comms on a day to day basis, you could also become a natural goto person when it hits the fan. If somebody is trying to get a hold of you, it makes it much easier to get ahold of them. This makes it much easier to organize if needed. This also can form an informal 'chain of command', which also makes communication and organization easier.

Just a quick example, I am a bit of a weather bug - got it from my mom. But when bad weather brews, I am on the cell texting my friends that are in the path of the tornado. A quick check in with them after the storm making sure everything is ok and with an offer to help can also help establish that communications relationship.

If you really want to use a CB as part of your comms plan......which is a good idea, My suggestion is to get a CB with single sideband capability.  You will have more power and some degree of privacy compared with traditional AM only CB's.  4watts is the legal limit for std AM only CB's while you can legally use 12 watts with SSB mode.  here is a link with info on CB radio.

 http://www.roadtripamerica.com/dashboarding/CB-Radios.htm

Keep in mind that 11 meters is considered HF.  That being said, because we are at the bottom of the sunspot cycle, don't expect too much distance.  Non licensed people would be better off with a Maxtrac converted to the GMRS band.  I personally have set up my own GMRS repeater and have radios in my vehicles.  Line of sight in my AO is about 50 miles.  Radio to radio is about 15 miles.

But then with the tech license, you will be able to use anything above 50 MHZ.  See band plan here

http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/Hambands_color.pdf

You will realize real, solid, reliable Radio to radio comms in the VHF band, more if you use local repeaters.  I have personally talked to great Britain on 2 m when using internet connected repeater systems.
enough for now
73's  bleeeeeppp!!!!!

Offline Tactical Badger

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Re: Comms
« Reply #13 on: September 23, 2008, 08:35:40 AM »
Yet another practice website...

http://www.kb0mga.net/exams/index.php

Offline stevebluff

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Re: Comms
« Reply #14 on: September 23, 2008, 03:56:44 PM »
Don't forgot a normal am/fm radio to keep up on the local news. LW and SW capabilities enhance the useful information that can be gathered. Go for a unit that has solar and/or wind up.


CB's are useful, vehicle, home mounted units plus hand held.


Basic walkie talkie, the license free kind are a great way to stay in touch up to a couple of ,miles. Just saw some wind up ones a couple of days ago.

The higher end stuff has been covered in great detail above apart from sat phones. they are not as expensive as people think, and can be a real life saver if you are out of GSM/Cell phone coverage.  I have used mine more in the national parks in the UK than in Africa or the middle east.





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kaiservontexas

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Re: Comms
« Reply #15 on: September 24, 2008, 04:41:17 PM »
One of the best preps you can make is to become a licensed Amateur radio operator and aquire some equipment.  My suggestion would be to start out with the tech license and work your way up to at least a general license where you can operate on most of the HF bands.  When the Shumer hits, you will be able to communicate with others and ultimately get info from sources other than the "gubment".

Hurricane Ike solidified this point into the group's mind. Friends and I consider ourselves a group. Ike disrupted the phones and cell networks. A text message, and we all know how they say use text messages to save bandwidth, would take hours to a day to arrive. The internet on my end failed before my power went out, and never mind the ones who did loss power. The last of our group finally got power restored this afternoon.

We all decided after such disruption of every form of communications we are familiar with failed that radio is a must in preps. If there would have been a real emergency, we all came through ok, nobody would have known. No means of calling for help. No means of checking on people. We ended up driving to each other's residences, which it is a good thing I stayed home because sometimes they missed each other as both were driving to the other person's place. We also understood that if we had to evac a convoy would be a goal. Radios would keep us in constant communication with each other while the rest of the grid went kaput.

Offline stevebluff

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Re: Comms
« Reply #16 on: September 24, 2008, 05:26:49 PM »
For non "end of the world" situation, like a hurricane, a sat phone and sat data terminal are the only way to maintain reliable sophisticated comms.  I design and deploy comms (voice and data) solutions for deployments to developing countries.  Plan b is always have a sat unit as back up! 

Offline Master Guns

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Re: Comms
« Reply #17 on: September 26, 2008, 08:41:39 PM »
Sat is great. I have  both personal and Work Sat phones.
But for the Normal person it is a bit over the top as to cost.
Most are costly to keep active even if you dont use it.

To have a phone that you can use ANYPLACE it is a great tool and I love it.
I still use my HAM radio gear more.
Scott


Offline stevebluff

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Re: Comms
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2008, 06:49:35 AM »
Sat is great. I have  both personal and Work Sat phones.
But for the Normal person it is a bit over the top as to cost.
Most are costly to keep active even if you dont use it.

To have a phone that you can use ANYPLACE it is a great tool and I love it.
I still use my HAM radio gear more.
Scott



To be honest I have looked at ham several times, but have never got around to taking my license.  It is on my "to do" list, and certainly would not argue that is an asset that some one in a community should have.

I supply Sat, HF, VHF and UHF, marine band, P25/Astro, TETRA, MPT1327 etc radio systems.  I have access to VHF and UHF hand-held and mobiles (vehicles and buildings), but find CB's, PMR446 (license free handhelds) and SW receivers cover most needs I can realistically think of for most preppers  and I would suggest these three ahead of a HAM set up.  Of course a cell/mobile phone is a great tools whilst they function, consider a push to talk version (nextel in US, www.youpoc.net in the UK).

Offline Master Guns

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Re: Comms
« Reply #19 on: September 29, 2008, 09:36:26 PM »
The Thing I like about HAM Radio is the World wide common factors.
In most countries you have reciprocal License agreements But it is not always the case.
As to 446 radios. I see this link about freq Differences.
http://www.geocities.com/euro446/frs.html

I did not know that the USA and UK had different frequency's.

But like you say as long as you have some sort of Comm the basics are covered and that is all you need most of the time.

Also HAM is not for work so it is better and required that you use it for Hobby and emergency use.

In the USA we have a good web page that you can see the Location and coverage of the Local Repeaters.
http://www.k5ehx.net/repeaters/qrepeater.php
You can click on any area in the USA and find the local repeaters.

For Emergency Situations it is a good Added Tool in the kit bag..
Scott

Offline stevebluff

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Re: Comms
« Reply #20 on: September 30, 2008, 12:35:43 AM »
Cheers Scott, what's the furthest call signs you have picked up regularly? I have some experience with HF both in the military and afterwards (ITT, Racal, Harris VHF/HF and CODAN - Australian HF).  I have always considered it an art not a science although the new link quality analysis radios are very cool.

Will get back to yuo all on the license free options in the US.

BR

Steve

arte et marte

kaiservontexas

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Re: Comms
« Reply #21 on: September 30, 2008, 11:13:00 AM »
Sat phones would be nice, but the group and I could not afford such a set up. The other issue I would have, and the point I was trying to make, is being not being dependent on a service provider. HAM/radios are not dependent upon a service provider; therefore, it is immune for technical glitches and what not that service providers occasionally suffer.

Offline Beetle

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Re: Comms
« Reply #22 on: September 30, 2008, 01:33:57 PM »
My wife and I are both hams. We have 2 meter rigs in our trucks that we use constantly. The repeaters in our area have a huge footprint. I suggest it for all.

Offline Hellboy

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Re: Comms
« Reply #23 on: October 01, 2008, 06:54:18 PM »
I got my tech lic this spring. I went out and got a Yaesu FT60R.  ;D I need to get a base station, but wated to get up to speed with the handheld first.

herculeze

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Re: Comms
« Reply #24 on: October 23, 2008, 04:38:25 PM »
I'm new to the comms and am wanting to buy a radio. I found what looks to be a good deal for a gmrs set up but from my understanding i need a licence to operate it even though the add says i don't.  I have to assume that it is due to the power source or the power behind the signal.  I'm also concerned about the batteries needing a charger and the charger needing 120V.  Any advise on the following:
pwr source (batteries, rechargeable, windup)
if left on for 72 hours expected drain time (#of batteries needed)
how gmrs is legal without licence
if bug out time occurs would it even matter
if i buy Motorola on the web and i want to talk to someone who buy whatever brand from walmart (probably 1-14)
the following link is a grms 2 way radio that i am interested in
http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=470598
it doesn't mention the channels it uses but i have to assume that since it says gmrs that is is the upper channels


Offline Beetle

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Re: Comms
« Reply #25 on: October 23, 2008, 04:52:44 PM »
I'm new to the comms and am wanting to buy a radio. I found what looks to be a good deal for a gmrs set up but from my understanding i need a licence to operate it even though the add says i don't.  I have to assume that it is due to the power source or the power behind the signal.  I'm also concerned about the batteries needing a charger and the charger needing 120V.  Any advise on the following:
pwr source (batteries, rechargeable, windup)
if left on for 72 hours expected drain time (#of batteries needed)
how gmrs is legal without licence
if bug out time occurs would it even matter
if i buy Motorola on the web and i want to talk to someone who buy whatever brand from walmart (probably 1-14)
the following link is a grms 2 way radio that i am interested in
http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=470598
it doesn't mention the channels it uses but i have to assume that since it says gmrs that is is the upper channels



Skip the GMRS route, Ham is way better. To get your ham license study an on line test (35 questions) Once your proficient with the on line test find a local club to give you the test. Cost $14 to get your license that is good for ten years( free to renew). Then go buy a couple Ham handhelds and your are in business. I just got the Yaesu VX 170 for $120, I also bought an optional car charger for $20 so don't have to rely on the grid. The radios are performing flawlessly, and using a repeater I can talk with my buddy who is 200miles away. Check out the on line study test at http://www.arrl.org/  You will be much happier with Ham than GMRS...Good luck   PS here is the link to look up the Yaesu vx170 you can read the specs on it http://www.yaesu.com/indexVS.cfm?cmd=DisplayProducts&ProdCatID=111&encProdID=7A3213027D790BCFC558E51B3306C192&DivisionID=65&isArchived=0
« Last Edit: October 23, 2008, 04:58:57 PM by Bailey »

Offline Bodhi

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Re: Comms
« Reply #26 on: November 05, 2008, 05:21:01 PM »
My wife and I are also hams (I have my General and she has her Tech), and one of the things that brought me into Ham radio was the use during an emergency.  I would highly suggest getting in touch with your local repeater owner and asking about local emergency "nets".  A net being a formal communications protocal for relaying emergency traffic.  Nets have been the backbone of what you hear about when Hurricanes and natural disasters hit.  Our local repeater owner would love for more people to be involved in learning how to "run" a net. 

Also, if you have a group of survival hams in your area, you can establish comms SOP's which would state that you are going to be online and monitoring during certain times, certain information being relayed...etc.  It's something I am working to develop and make a part of our emergency kits/plans. 

-Bodhi

Offline Tactical Badger

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Re: Comms
« Reply #27 on: November 06, 2008, 06:00:49 AM »
I ordered a Yaesu VX-6R just the other day.  I take my Tech test next Sunday.  I'm looking forward to using the Amateur radio waves.  I've got one buddy who is a Tech.  We're trying to get the rest of our friends to get their liscense so we can develope a comm network.

I've had zero luck with FRS.  The Mrs. Badger and I both carry FRS/GMRS radios in our BOB's.  But, we both realize the limitations of those.  They would be used only once we got into the same area and couldn't make contact through cell phones.

I would LOVE it if she would get her Tech liscense, but I really don't see that happening.

HAM is the way to go if you ask me.  Plus, the HT I picked has a very wide range receiver on it so I can have access to info from a variety of sources.  Too bad television is going to go digital next year.

Offline iron mike

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Re: Comms
« Reply #28 on: November 06, 2008, 07:36:02 AM »
I'm new to the comms and am wanting to buy a radio. I found what looks to be a good deal for a gmrs set up but from my understanding i need a licence to operate it even though the add says i don't.  I have to assume that it is due to the power source or the power behind the signal.  I'm also concerned about the batteries needing a charger and the charger needing 120V.  Any advise on the following:
pwr source (batteries, rechargeable, windup)
if left on for 72 hours expected drain time (#of batteries needed)
how gmrs is legal without licence
if bug out time occurs would it even matter
if i buy Motorola on the web and i want to talk to someone who buy whatever brand from walmart (probably 1-14)
the following link is a grms 2 way radio that i am interested in
http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=470598
it doesn't mention the channels it uses but i have to assume that since it says gmrs that is is the upper channels



You might want to consider eXRS radios ,  for licence free  short range SECURE person to person & group comms these are really hard to beat
http://www.trisquare.us/

http://www.cutratebazaar.com/  has them at $70 a set w/ charger ect.

Offline Beetle

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Re: Comms
« Reply #29 on: November 06, 2008, 10:04:04 AM »
I ordered a Yaesu VX-6R just the other day.  I take my Tech test next Sunday.  I'm looking forward to using the Amateur radio waves.  I've got one buddy who is a Tech.  We're trying to get the rest of our friends to get their liscense so we can develope a comm network.

I've had zero luck with FRS.  The Mrs. Badger and I both carry FRS/GMRS radios in our BOB's.  But, we both realize the limitations of those.  They would be used only once we got into the same area and couldn't make contact through cell phones.

I would LOVE it if she would get her Tech liscense, but I really don't see that happening.

HAM is the way to go if you ask me.  Plus, the HT I picked has a very wide range receiver on it so I can have access to info from a variety of sources.  Too bad television is going to go digital next year.

Sweet Tactical let us know what your call sign will be....PS did you get a car charger for your radio also?