Author Topic: Medical SHTF got me Thursday - new prep focus  (Read 18048 times)

Offline Mielikki

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Re: Medical SHTF got me Thursday - new prep focus
« Reply #30 on: April 18, 2009, 09:35:59 AM »
Can you get vaccinated against forms of baceria? I thought it was only viruses.

Yeah, you can. For example tuberculosis, tetanus, diphteria and whooping cough are caused by bacteria, and there are vaccines against them. All of them are also something you might want to be vaccinated against in case of SHTF :P

Offline Beetle

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Re: Medical SHTF got me Thursday - new prep focus
« Reply #31 on: April 18, 2009, 11:37:52 AM »
This might be a silly question, I to got sick and dehydrated and I drank 7 up. Is 7 up good for rehydration?

Offline wbo3

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Re: Medical SHTF got me Thursday - new prep focus
« Reply #32 on: April 18, 2009, 11:58:22 AM »
That's why we all need to make best friends with a nurse and make sure she stays at your house if SHTF.  I've got 2 already lined up. ;D

I married one.  Hell, I was her practice dummy when we were in college.

Offline something_feral

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Re: Medical SHTF got me Thursday - new prep focus
« Reply #33 on: April 18, 2009, 01:51:02 PM »

I married one.  Hell, I was her practice dummy when we were in college.


Ha! +1!  ;D

Offline student

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Re: Medical SHTF got me Thursday - new prep focus
« Reply #34 on: April 18, 2009, 06:09:17 PM »
There are vaccines for viruses, bacteria and toxins.

Some common bacterial / bacterial toxin vaccines include:

Note that not all of these are on the routine vaccination schedule. Some are available only on request (e.g. for travellers) or for people at higher risk (e.g. people taking chemotherapy, working in certain environments).

For more information on the vaccines themselves:
CDC - Vaccines & Preventable Diseases

1 The cholera vaccine also provides a short-term 60% reduction in diarrhoea caused by heat-labile toxin producing enterotoxigenic E. coli (LT-ETEC). LT-ETEC is responsible for 20% of cases of travellers diarrhoea. Peltola H, Siitonen A, Kyrönseppä H, et al. Prevention of travellers' diarrhoea by oral B-subunit/whole-cell cholera vaccine. Lancet 1991;338:1285-9.

Offline boredparamedic

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Re: Medical SHTF got me Thursday - new prep focus
« Reply #35 on: May 29, 2009, 12:39:24 AM »
Student: wished I knew that there was a vaccination for Borrelia burgdorferi  before I got Lyme disease! ( and was exposed, and got TB thanks to an illegal.) Would have saved me a bunch of problems that I have now!

Offline Asclepius

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Re: Medical SHTF got me Thursday - new prep focus
« Reply #36 on: June 03, 2009, 11:00:49 AM »
Okay well as long as you understand that dextrose destroys tissue when it extravasates .



Subcutaneous dextrose for rehydration:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2318/4/2

Conclusion
The four studies appraised all provide evidence that appropriate volumes of subcutaneous dextrose infusions (in the form of half-normal saline-glucose 5%, 40 g/L dextrose and 30 mmol/L NaCl, or 5% dextrose solution and 4 g/L NaCl, or two-thirds 5% glucose and one-third normal saline) can be used effectively for the treatment of dehydration, with similar rates of adverse effects to intravenous infusion. The evidence in this area is limited, and larger randomised controlled trials using validated outcome measures would be useful to confirm these results.


Offline EmmaPeel

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Re: Medical SHTF got me Thursday - new prep focus
« Reply #37 on: June 04, 2009, 12:18:56 PM »
I have a question -- I always thought you wanted to avoid things like Immodiam AD since part of the purpose of the diarrhea was to get the organism making you sick out as fast as possible.  My childrens' ped told me that one time.  Does that only apply to your basic baby stomach flu?  Or, is it still better to take the Immodiam to avoid dehydration?


walker

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Re: Medical SHTF got me Thursday - new prep focus
« Reply #38 on: June 04, 2009, 09:24:39 PM »
I have a question -- I always thought you wanted to avoid things like Immodiam AD since part of the purpose of the diarrhea was to get the organism making you sick out as fast as possible.  My childrens' ped told me that one time.  Does that only apply to your basic baby stomach flu?  Or, is it still better to take the Immodiam to avoid dehydration?

My response is "It depends upon the circumstances."  Immodium (Loperamide) should not be used if the stool has blood or mucus/pus, as this can indicate a bacterial cause.  Also do not use it if there are signs of a potential bowel obstruction (sometimes diarrhea or jelly stool, fever, steady abdominal pain, vomiting, hard abdomen).  Overall, I would agree with your pediatrician,  it does not make sense to use it as the body is trying to rid itself of either a bacteria, virus, or toxin.  I would never use it on a child under 5, as they have a higher risk for a bowel obstruction and other complications.  The only time I would use it on myself or family would be if we had to travel (by foot, plane, auto, etc.) and could not remain close to a toilet, or if using a cat hole every 10-20 min. in the back country during foot travel was out of the question.  For most instances of diarrhea, you should be able to easily replace lost fluids with drinking oral rehydration solutions (avoid plain water, or concentrated solutions).
Here is a good thread on hydration solutions: http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=313.0
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 12:25:08 AM by Archer »