Author Topic: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles  (Read 98086 times)

Offline theBINKYhunter

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My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« on: August 24, 2013, 10:54:19 AM »
Let me start by saying I am not a gear head at all.

I wanted to start this thread to possibly help motivate and/or encourage other members who aren’t yet doing their own maintenance. Up until a month ago the only thing I could do was change a tire, check (not change) my oil and fluid levels, change wipers and fill up the gas tank. Anything more than that and I went to a shop.

I decided to change all of that because what if there are no shops? What if I need to do a repair on the side of a road because I can’t get a tow or I can’t afford a tow? Also it is a lot cheaper to do the work yourself. I wanted to start learning how to do my own repairs and maintenance. I honestly feel between shop manuals, Youtube, and search engines there is no reason to NOT do your own work, unless you don’t have the equipment (I don’t have a cherry picker so no rebuilt engines for me… yet).

Last month I did the brakes and rotor on my car (05 Chevy Malibu Maxx). Holy cow was that easy. I didn’t take any pictures so I won’t go into detail but I did the numbers and I saved at least $100, gained some knowledge, and honestly it probably took me as long to do the job as it would have if I’d gone to a shop after you factor in driving and waiting.

I will say that a great place I found online to buy parts is www.rockauto.com. They have great prices and quick shipping. Check them out if your local prices are really high.

So here’s the most recent repair I did: I had to replace to filler neck tube on my 94 Ford Ranger.

I got home to find gas leaking onto my driveway. I called a couple of local shops because I thought the tank was going to have to be pulled and no one could even look at it until next week. The leak was right next to the frame and I couldn’t see any holes so I did the only thing I really could which was to siphon out gas. After about a gallon the leak stopped. That was a good thing and after I calmed down about spilling gas everywhere I did some research and determined that it was most likely a cracked filler neck tube as it’s a common problem on my truck. It is almost 20 years old and I’m sure it has never been replaced.

So let’s get started on the repair!

First things first: there are three screws that hold the filler neck tube (FNT) to the side of the bed. Take those out, remove the gas cap, and then push the FNT back through the hole.



I had the option to either drop the tank or remove the bed. I don’t have a vehicle lift of jack stands (those are on my short list and Harbor Freight just did a coupon!), or 15 gallons worth of empty gas cans to siphon off the fuel.

A ranger forum I frequent had multiple people say that removing the bed is the simplest solution. I needed a T55 torx bit that the local auto store had. Lucky me my neighbor had a breaker bar I was able to use.



Once the bolts were loosened I used a ratchet wrench to get them out. They are long!



My bed had six bolts and once all were out I was ready to lift and move the bed. I read that a guy was able move the bed by himself… I’m not really sure how he did that. I guess if I had really wanted to I could have but I caught my neighbor on his way out and he lent me a hand. Also note that I needed to unplug the lights or I would have ruined the wiring.

We only needed to move it back about a foot. I placed some scrap blocks I keep around on the bumper to keep the paint nice on the rear of the bed. The front of the bed rested on my tires. (The bed only weighs about 200 lbs).





Here you can see the FNT and fuel pump and 20 years of dirt. You can also see the stains from the fuel that was leaking. This made me feel good because I had correctly diagnosed the problem without actually seeing the problem.



Here you can see how cracked the end of the tube was that went into the gas tank.



And here is the nice new one right before I installed it. I didn’t take a picture of the whole unit installed, but basically the small end on the left goes into the tank and then there is a c-clamp that you tighten down to secure it to the tank.



I had a friend come over that afternoon and help me put the bed back on the frame. Bolted it down and attached the new FNT to the bed, installed a new locking gas cap and reconnected all of the light wiring (only two harnesses for me, taillights and license plate lights) and I’m back on the road!

In retrospect I probably should have replaced the fuel pump while I had the bed off as it’s probably 20 years old too (I got the truck with 80k original a few months ago). I didn’t think about it and I need the vehicle operational so it’ll have to wait until I either take the bed off again for something else or the pump starts to fail.

How about some project analysis? I ordered the FNT from Amazon as they had the best price. $39 plus Prime 2 day shipping. The local auto store wanted $160 for their cheapest and even www.rockauto.com FNT’s were running around $80, plus about 5 days for shipping. Total work time was only about two hours, although I spent another hour cleaning the frame, brushing dirt off the lines and using my shop vac to blow out all of the dirt that I broke loose. I had to buy the torx bit for $5.

So for about two hours of work and $44 I fixed my problem, I can only imagine what a shop would have charged me… I’m guessing it would have been in the $300 - $400 range.

As I do more repairs/work I’ll update this thread. One cool thing that has happened from this is my dad now wants to do his fuel pump with me. I showed him these pictures and he was pretty impressed. He is like how I used to be an always goes to a shop. They quoted him $600 for the repair. Rockauto has the pump for $160 and we’ll be doing pretty much the same thing. I’ll post that repair job once it’s been done.


Offline Ms. Albatross

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2013, 11:19:08 AM »
Kudos to you TWH! :clap:

I remember all of these  :banghead:  when your family doubted your ability to do the brake job.  It's awesome that you got your dad to trust you enough to do his needed repair job. 

Remember, no "I told you so" to your family - just small treats with the money you saved.  ;)
Thanks for sharing.  I look forward to seeing your future repairs documented here.  BTW - great photos.  They really help!
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OIL LADY'S DEFINITION OF A PREPPER: A prepper is someone who takes advantage of the monetary freedom offered by good economic conditions of non-wartime prosperity to stockpile for himself readily available supplies and equipment of a lifestyle-supporting nature. He specifically chooses to engage in such stockpiling during easy economic times so that when bad economic times eventually cycle around again, he will be prepared to engage in the self-preserving undertaking of riding out a lengthy period of scarcity of those same supplies and equipment without harming others in the process. The goal of the prepper is to be fully self-sufficient at all times --good times and bad-- without breaking laws or causing harm to others.

Offline bdhutier

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2013, 12:21:18 PM »
Sweet, bro!  Even better you had a little head out there while you were doing it!  The other day, I dropped the front tank on my truck and had the kids under there with me.  They can't wait to do the rear... and the fuel pump... and the front differential... the list never ends!!
Tolerance is the virtue of the man with no convictions.
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Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2013, 12:57:26 PM »
Sweet, bro!  Even better you had a little head out there while you were doing it!  The other day, I dropped the front tank on my truck and had the kids under there with me.  They can't wait to do the rear... and the fuel pump... and the front differential... the list never ends!!

yeah, she was stacking he spare blocks that i didn't use. she's either doing that or playing inside the cab when i'm out working on it.

and yes the list never ends. my ABS light comes on every now and then which leads me to believe it's a dirty sensor on the rear dif. i need to get under there and take care of that. but since it's not critical i'll probably put it off until cooler weather presides.


Offline NWPilgrim

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2013, 10:34:11 AM »
Kudos to you on your successful repair.  That is pretty good being able to get info on the web to diagnose the most likely problem.  Besides saving money, you learned more about the state of other parts on your truck, took the time to do some cleanup most shops would not have done, and you increased your skill base.  Good stuff.

I am in the "take it to the shop" club for my vehicles right now.  I do most of my home repairs such as the washer I just replaced the pump and clutch on.  In the past I have installed hardwood floors, replaced central air ducts, vent fans, electrical outlets, laid 18" floor tiles, etc.  But car repairs I just left to the shop.

I want to get an older work truck and then start doing most of the work on it myself.  Your thread here is good inspiration!
There have always been times like this, and there will be again. Will we rise to the challenges or get run over?

Offline bdhutier

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2013, 12:35:52 PM »
... such as the washer I just replaced the pump and clutch on.

You just proved can do 80% of your vehicle repairs yourself (if you want to), then!  Another 18% can be taken care of with the help of Google or a friend, and maybe 2% in a shop due to specialty tools and such.
Tolerance is the virtue of the man with no convictions.
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So go do some PT, then by all means take some ninja classes.
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Offline MTUCache

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2013, 02:28:50 PM »
 :clap:

More guts than me. I'm in the same place you started, but haven't ventured too far down this road yet.

 :popcorn:
"The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." - Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America (1835)

"I worry about the effects on the long-run stability and efficiency of our financial system if the Fed attempts to substitute its judgments for those of the market. Such a regime would only increase the unhealthy tendency of investors to pay more attention to rumors about policymakers' attitudes than to the economic fundamentals that by rights should determine the allocation of capital." - Ben Bernanke, "Asset-Price 'Bubbles' and Monetary Policy" (October 15, 2002) i.e., Debacle + Irony = FED

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2013, 04:15:21 PM »
and maybe 2% in a shop due to specialty tools and such.

i'd argue with this as most auto shops have those tools that you can rent to do the job, and lots of them will rent them for free (security deposit refunded upon return). i can see the issue with large lifts and cherry-picker stuff though, that's where i am right now, as mentioned in the OP... so i'll say it's 1% ;)


Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2013, 04:16:52 PM »
I am in the "take it to the shop" club for my vehicles right now.  I do most of my home repairs such as the washer I just replaced the pump and clutch on.  In the past I have installed hardwood floors, replaced central air ducts, vent fans, electrical outlets, laid 18" floor tiles, etc. 

i honestly believe owning a home is what has given me the confidence to branch out to the vehicles. i've enclosed part of my garage to add a room, that required running electrical and air ducts. i've installed tile and painted among other things.


Offline NWPilgrim

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2013, 04:18:50 PM »
You just proved can do 80% of your vehicle repairs yourself (if you want to), then!  Another 18% can be taken care of with the help of Google or a friend, and maybe 2% in a shop due to specialty tools and such.

That's encouraging.  For some reason I have a mental block about working on my vehicles.  Not much on the house intimidates me: I've taken out entire walls, rebuilt a walk-in closet, rewired for bath lights and venting.  for some reason I like figuring that out.  I have done disc brakes, tune-ups on older cars, replaced the head gasket on a 1987 Subaru, replaced water pumps, alternators and a starter on various vehicles in the past.  It just isn't much fun for me. But, I admit it is a valuable skill to have and you only get it by doing.

Keep posting your efforts as it is an inspiration to some of us on the fence.
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Offline NWPilgrim

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2013, 04:23:01 PM »
i'd argue with this as most auto shops have those tools that you can rent to do the job, and lots of them will rent them for free (security deposit refunded upon return). i can see the issue with large lifts and cherry-picker stuff though, that's where i am right now, as mentioned in the OP... so i'll say it's 1% ;)

Really?!  I never knew auto shops would rent tool.  Are you talking hand tools such as special wrenches, etc.?  I assume then they would also work on a pulled part if it needed welding, pulling, etc?  Are these typically the local small shops, or is it most auto shops (I assume not dealer shops though)?  Thanks for any details you can provide because that is a show stopper for me when you need a $200 tool to replace a $50 part.
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Offline alan123

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #11 on: August 25, 2013, 04:35:52 PM »
I think he means places like Autozone. I have borrowed a wheel bearing  driver from them. You can get cherry pickers from a rental yard. Towable or breakdown type.
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Offline bdhutier

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2013, 04:50:21 PM »
Really?!  I never knew auto shops would rent tool.  Are you talking hand tools such as special wrenches, etc.?  I assume then they would also work on a pulled part if it needed welding, pulling, etc?  Are these typically the local small shops, or is it most auto shops (I assume not dealer shops though)?  Thanks for any details you can provide because that is a show stopper for me when you need a $200 tool to replace a $50 part.

Not very many (if any) shops themselves will rent tools out, because most of what you see is owned by the individual mechanics.  Most stores will, though (AutoZone, and such).  Local shops will 99% of the time weld, cut, or press for you for a small fee.  Dealerships almost never will, unless your cousin works there or something.

i'd argue with this as most auto shops have those tools that you can rent to do the job, and lots of them will rent them for free (security deposit refunded upon return). i can see the issue with large lifts and cherry-picker stuff though, that's where i am right now, as mentioned in the OP... so i'll say it's 1% ;)

It really depends... See above for rentals.  Cherry pickers and tranny-jacks are cheap, and easy to use.  Lifts are convenient, but it's nothing a floor jack and a good set of jack stands won't fix.  Don't need a shop for those.  Where you're going to run into trouble is, no one on the face of the earth is going to rent or lend out their $5000 Snap-on diagnostic scanner, which you'll have to use for anything sensor/ECM related, and newer than OBDII.  They will hook it up for $80, though. 
Tolerance is the virtue of the man with no convictions.
-- G. K. Chesterton

So go do some PT, then by all means take some ninja classes.
-- Chemsoldier


Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #13 on: August 25, 2013, 11:13:11 PM »
Not very many (if any) shops themselves will rent tools out, because most of what you see is owned by the individual mechanics.  Most stores will, though (AutoZone, and such).  Local shops will 99% of the time weld, cut, or press for you for a small fee.  Dealerships almost never will, unless your cousin works there or something.

It really depends... See above for rentals.  Cherry pickers and tranny-jacks are cheap, and easy to use.  Lifts are convenient, but it's nothing a floor jack and a good set of jack stands won't fix.  Don't need a shop for those.  Where you're going to run into trouble is, no one on the face of the earth is going to rent or lend out their $5000 Snap-on diagnostic scanner, which you'll have to use for anything sensor/ECM related, and newer than OBDII.  They will hook it up for $80, though. 

yeah, i meant places like auto zone and o'reilly (where i go). usually if you need that oddball tool they have it and you can rent it.

and yes, there are a few things that would be hard to come buy unless you knew someone in the shop. that's why i gave it the 1% still.

and i hear you on the floor jacks/jack stands to replace a lift. i have an axle leak i have to look at next on my car. no way i'm getting under that car with just a floor jack. i'll be putting the front end up on jack stands before i even think of getting under there.

when i was 16 i changed a tire on an incline and was too dumb to block the wheels. the car rolled off the jack and the axle nearly crushed my head. i pulled my head out the second before it happened because i heard a weird noise, that would be the car starting to roll.


Offline bdhutier

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #14 on: August 26, 2013, 12:01:35 AM »
when i was 16 i changed a tire on an incline and was too dumb to block the wheels. the car rolled off the jack and the axle nearly crushed my head. i pulled my head out the second before it happened because i heard a weird noise, that would be the car starting to roll.

That's similar to the way I learned to safety-check when taking over jobs from other mechanics.  I finished a starter replacement in a Kenworth (60lbs) for another guy once.  You have to lay right under it to get it in.  As I almost got it all the way up, I discovered he never disconnected the batteries, and I was showered with sparks.  Still not sure how I managed not to drop it on my face!!!

I got a shit-ton of beer out of that one!!
Tolerance is the virtue of the man with no convictions.
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So go do some PT, then by all means take some ninja classes.
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Offline Mountain State Prepper

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2013, 06:08:16 AM »


WH,

You went from changing your brakes to taking the bed off your truck in what?....a month?    I'm sure you realize how cool that is, but I'll tell you anyway, that is ....well....cool!    Obviously it wasn't above your head, but as a second step into auto maintainence it isn't as easy as you make it look.     In fact, IMO, this is beyond calling it maintainence, it is auto repair at this point.    Brakes, wipers, oil changes, tire rotation all are maintainence.    Taking the bed off your truck to replace the gooseneck on your fuel tank is definately not routine work.

Great pics!  New career as an auto mechanice in your future?
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Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #16 on: August 26, 2013, 08:08:21 AM »
Great pics!  New career as an auto mechanice in your future?

thanks for the kind words. and no on the mechanic, i'm actually tossing around going the LEO route right now. there's a thread on the work board for that.

i'm thinking that working on vehicles is like yard work (to me): i enjoy doing it for myself, or would enjoy helping a friend, but the minute i was doing it and getting paid i would probably hate it. case in point: i like working on my yard, but i hate working on my boss' (part of my job duties).


Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #17 on: September 02, 2013, 11:38:04 PM »
I love updating this thread because:

1)   It means I’m learning as I go since I’m new to taking care of my own vehicles
2)   It means I’m hopefully helping others get to the point where they are OK to work on their own
3)   I’m usually saving money since shops overcharge for components and I have to pay labor

Today I’ll be posting about my 05 Malibu Maxx.

So let me set the stage for you. Labor Day weekend. My family off on a short road trip to the White Mountains. We drive up to the Show Low / Snowflake area. The Mogollon Rim is beautiful! Great weather. We’re staying at my friend’s BOL with his family and one other… our ‘team’ if you will. Fun, bonding, and good times ensue.

But alas, all good things must come to an end. Time to go home! Sleep in my own bed and sit on my own toilet (I don’t care who you are, everyone misses their toilet). Off we go do drive through the scenic forests and luscious landscapes. Seven and eight percent grades (where’s my motorcycle?) of twisting and winding roads.

To keep my wife happy and avoid going through a guard rail judicious use of the brakes was needed. But about half way home every time I applied the brakes my driver side front wheel sounded like it was going to rip itself away from my car. The steering wheel would vibrate and shake and frankly it was pretty scary given the driving conditions.

Side note here: our car is a manumatic – the type of transmission that is generally an automatic, but it gives you the option to shift like a stick… with the push of a button… and no clutch… so you can pretend like you’re speed racer… I guess. Before this trip I thought it was a stupid novelty item and never used it. But in order to curb my speed it actually came in handy. I was able to keep the car in a lower gear and that helped to keep my speed down and reduce the use of my brakes. Figured I’d drop that bit of knowledge on you before I got into today’s repair.

OK, back to the meat and potatoes.

I got home and thought maybe it was the CV joint, especially since during the last oil change I was told I had a leak somewhere on my front axle. I looked everywhere and couldn’t see a leak at all. I also couldn’t break the axle nut since I’m weak and had no impact wrench so I decided to get the rotors checked out since they looked pretty rough and they were pretty old.

Sure enough the driver rotor was worn unevenly and while machining it might have done the job, I opted to get new rotors and install them. Here we go!

First thing is to make sure you have good tools. My jack decided to crap out on me today so I had to go buy a new one. Not too big a deal though since I needed jack stands and the parts store had a combo.

Note: never get under your vehicle with just a jack!!!! If I had been under there when my jack failed I would have been in a world of hurt, maybe dead. Use jack stands or something else to keep a vehicle up!

Here are my new toys:



And here is what we are going to be disassembling and working with today.



Note: I didn’t take any pictures of removal since I was in a hurry to get the parts checked out, that’s why my rotors look brand new even though I’m writing this as a tear down.

On my car there are two components that need to be removed to change brake pads and rotors. There is the caliper which holds the brake pads and the piston which attached to the caliper. Each has two bolts that need to come out. Also it helps to remove the mount that the brake line attaches to so you have more play with moving the parts around.

Here is a nifty trick when taking stuff off, put on lug back on in order to keep the rotor from flopping around and being a pain in the rear.



First the piston housing. The two bolts are in red. Remove those and the housing moves freely.



Also let’s remove the brake line mount from its position so we can move things around better.





So now the piston is free. You can see that it is hollow – this piston needs to be pushed back in, we’ll do that a little later. Just a note that my rear pistons are solid and those had to be turned back in like a screw, make sure you know how yours go in so you don’t damage anything.



Let’s hang the piston out of the way, the struts are a great place to do this:



Now let’s get the caliper off. There are two bolts for those (different size from the piston on my car)



Once the bolts are removed this piece slides right off. Here is what it looks like by itself (brake pads installed)



There was a ton of red grease crap all over everything. I cleaned all of that off. Also this is a great time to take a wire brush and go over the caliper, piston housing, and wheel axle and clean up everything. There is a ton of dirt and crud in there. You may want to wear a mask as you are basically brushing and blowing powdered dirt everywhere.





OK, now that we have the dirty stuff clean it’s time to reset the piston. The beauty of my car and cars with similar brakes is that you don’t have to bleed the lines or even open the master cylinder, as long as you do things slowly.

They make a special tool to do this next step, but why buy a tool you will probably only need a few times when you can rig one up yourself? All you need is a c-clamp big enough to span the piston and a piece of wood, I used a piece of fur stripping that I had lying around. Set it up like so and slowly compress the piston back into the housing.



Be careful of the rubber gasket that is around the piston. You don’t want to rip that. I had a section of it not seat right and bulge out on me. I was afraid of it pinching against the brake pads when I reinstalled it. All I had to do was pump the brakes to push the pistons out and the reset it again. No problem.

Once the pistons are reset it’s time to get the rotors on. You need to clean them as they are shipped in a protective coating of oil. If you don’t clean them I’m told that stuff will gum up on your brake pads and you’ll have a problem you don’t need on your hands.

Brake cleaner and a rag is all you need. Spray the surface that the pads will touch and wipe clean. The brake cleaner evaporates quickly so work quickly, I like to do both sides twice, alternating them front back front back.



Once clean put the rotors on the axel and use the lug nut trick I showed you earlier! It will save you a lot of cussing and headache when reinstalling everything.

Now all you have to do is reverse the process. I didn’t show pictures but make sure you grease the contacts points on the OUTSIDE of the brake pads. So basically on the inboard pad a ring/the center where the piston will touch. On the outboard grease the edges of the pad where the piston mount touches them.

Get everything put back together then hop in the car. Slowly pump the brakes several times. This will push the pistons back out and allow them to operate the brakes. You’ll feel them tense up after a few pumps. Again, do this slowly, I’ve heard if you jam them to the floor you could cause a spike in pressure and hurt the master cylinder.

Once the brake pedal feels good, get the tires on, drop the car, tighten the lugs, and take it for a test drive. I do several long slow braking stops and then a few high speed stops, then as a final test I get up to about 50/60 and jam the brakes to the floor. If you aren’t dead then you did a good job.


Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #18 on: September 02, 2013, 11:46:43 PM »
What’s this? Another post within minutes of the last? Yes my friends, this thread is almost as good as Oil Lady’s book thread, I keep the updates coming.

Also while on our trip my rear driver side blinker went out. This car seems to run through blinkers like they’re going out of style so this is a familiar fix and a quick one. I probably got this done in under five minutes.

Here’s my light, there are two Phillips screws that need to come out. You can see one in the top and the other near the bottom:



There are two little expanding plastic pieces that help to seat it, but once the two screws are out you can pull the assembly straight out. Then it looks like this:



I need to change the light in the middle



To remove these types of light you just give them a little twist and they come right out. No messing with any individual wires at all, just the harness/bulb socket.



Sure enough, my old bulb burned right out



They bulbs pull right out. Put the new one in and test it before you reinstall everything, that way in case something is wrong you’re not kicking yourself for having to take it apart again.

Success!



Put it all back together and now people won’t get mad at you for not signaling your turn/lane change.


Offline NWPilgrim

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #19 on: September 03, 2013, 02:41:49 AM »
Nice write up and photos on the brake job.  That is why I love disc brakes over drum brakes, they are so simple in design and repair.  Your write up illustrates that well.
There have always been times like this, and there will be again. Will we rise to the challenges or get run over?

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #20 on: September 03, 2013, 07:41:10 AM »
Nice write up and photos on the brake job.  That is why I love disc brakes over drum brakes, they are so simple in design and repair.  Your write up illustrates that well.

thanks. my truck has drums in the rear and i haven't attempted to mess with those yet. i may be wrong, but i think i have seen that you can swap out the drums and replace with discs, i may look into that when the time comes.


Offline oktheniknow

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #21 on: September 03, 2013, 09:15:01 AM »
Great posts.
On one of our vehicles have changed out the blinker several times. Always good to have extras around.
Wish the car repair manuals had photos as good as yours!
Needing to get some car ramps and may get jacks as well.

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #22 on: September 03, 2013, 09:54:08 AM »
Wish the car repair manuals had photos as good as yours!

Amen!

What do Chilton's and others use to take photos a Brownie camera and super glare lights?  It always seems that one little part you are most interested in lies in pitch black contrast shadow.

Anyway, great photos WarriorHunter.
There have always been times like this, and there will be again. Will we rise to the challenges or get run over?

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #23 on: September 03, 2013, 09:57:45 AM »
Great posts.
On one of our vehicles have changed out the blinker several times. Always good to have extras around.
Wish the car repair manuals had photos as good as yours!
Needing to get some car ramps and may get jacks as well.

ramps would be a good idea for me... then i could essentially get the whole car off the ground if i needed too. i was going to get another set of jack stands but i had forgotten about those.


Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #24 on: September 03, 2013, 09:59:30 AM »
Amen!

What do Chilton's and others use to take photos a Brownie camera and super glare lights?  It always seems that one little part you are most interested in lies in pitch black contrast shadow.

Anyway, great photos WarriorHunter.

thanks, i figure the clearer i can make it the better. i actually bought a chiltons when at the store thinking the repair was going to be a cv boot but it wasn't. after i did the rotors i decided i'm going to return the manual for the exact reason you mentioned. the pictures aren't that great, and frankly i have been able to find everything i need on car forums, through google, or youtube. why pay 20 bucks for something else to clutter my garage when i can use the net.


Offline oktheniknow

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #25 on: September 03, 2013, 10:40:30 AM »
If a publisher came out with crisp, clear color photos for car repair manuals they would sell like hotcakes.
Course, repair places wouldn't like it so much. Youtube is good, but not when you have a limited Internet data plan.

Offline cpf240

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #26 on: September 03, 2013, 03:30:54 PM »
You might want to look into replacing the bulbs with LEDs, if they are available for your application. In theory, LEDs should last for a very long time, and they are often brighter than the stock bulbs. The only real problem is they can be expensive!
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Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #27 on: September 04, 2013, 07:26:54 AM »
You might want to look into replacing the bulbs with LEDs, if they are available for your application. In theory, LEDs should last for a very long time, and they are often brighter than the stock bulbs. The only real problem is they can be expensive!

thanks for the tip. i have seen LEDs for the headlights, but i've never looked at them for the blinkers.


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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #28 on: September 04, 2013, 10:21:28 AM »
thanks. my truck has drums in the rear and i haven't attempted to mess with those yet. i may be wrong, but i think i have seen that you can swap out the drums and replace with discs, i may look into that when the time comes.
The 8.8 axles came with both drums and discs so they swap should be fairly easy. I would grab a disc axle at a pull a part to get everything you need. Disc brake pistons require more psi then drum wheel cylinders so you will need to get a disc/disc master cylinder also and the correct brake proportioning valve.
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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #29 on: September 04, 2013, 10:53:48 AM »
The 8.8 axles came with both drums and discs so they swap should be fairly easy. I would grab a disc axle at a pull a part to get everything you need. Disc brake pistons require more psi then drum wheel cylinders so you will need to get a disc/disc master cylinder also and the correct brake proportioning valve.

hmm... sounds like it may be cheaper easier to stick with drums... i'll have to research it more. my truck is due for an oil change so i'll be doing that and rotating the tires. when i get them off i'll inspect everything and see if need to replace anything. might be a fun project though.