Author Topic: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles  (Read 156209 times)

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #180 on: February 22, 2014, 12:19:49 PM »
yep, and when i need a bulb i tend to only need one, and they are usually sold as a set, so i have a drawer in an organizer bin full of spare bulbs

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #181 on: February 22, 2014, 04:08:33 PM »
figured i'd share here, i just saw a pretty cool OBD2 scan tool that works with your andoid: http://www.amazon.com/BAFX-Products-Bluetooth-diagnostics-Android/dp/B005NLQAHS/ref=cm_wl_huc_item

has over 1800 reviews and almost 5 starts on amazon, might be something to look into if you do a lot of your own work, i know most shops will read codes for you, but the ability to do it yourself would be really nice. i'll probably pick one up eventually, but i'm already buying a couple tools for this suspension/steering job so that will have to wait.

Offline boyscout57

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #182 on: February 22, 2014, 06:11:40 PM »
OBD2 scanners are great for starting you in the right direction. They only can indicate when something is out of spec, like Bank 1 Position 1 O2 lean....doesn't mean the sensor is bad, but it is reading conditions outside of normal operating perameters....How would you feel spending $150 on an oxygen sensor and then finding out it was 75 cents worth of vacuun lline that caused the code. There are specific diagnostic guides in the factory service manuals for each code that helps you get to the problem. Advace, Autozone and O'Rieley will read the code for free but it is up to you or the technician fgure out the real problem. Having been a technician for many years and now a parts pofessional, I have seen way too many parts replaced by blindly followig a diagnostic code without the full diagnostics done. If you get the scanner,you will need the factory manual or access to All-Data service for the poceedures that you'll need. It think Autozone sells on-line access to All-Data for $20 for 7 days access....check it out.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #183 on: February 24, 2014, 12:49:32 PM »
i shared this on another thread but i thought it could be applied here. basically a guy used a dash cam to catch a dealer service center ripping him off and charging him for way more work than was actually done. another reason why learning to do things yourself can help to save you money and time.

here's a link to the other forum thread (not sure if guests can see it): http://www.chevymalibuforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=31610

youtube link to just the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQ3wzKgzuVQ

Offline ncjeeper

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #184 on: February 24, 2014, 05:22:03 PM »
They don't call them stealerships for nothing. ;D

Offline Zef_66

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #185 on: February 25, 2014, 10:43:01 AM »
The 194"s are a common bulb. Never hurts to have a spare pack. You will find them used in side marker lights and as dash lights too.

Yeah, I always have several spares of almost every bulb I use in the toolbox. Just last week I started the car, walked over to the truck to grab something I needed, and noticed a fog light bulb was out. So I went in the garage, got a 893 bulb out of the tool box, and in 2 minutes it was fixed. Now I just need to pick up another spare.

But this does remind me I have one of my two license plate bulbs out.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #186 on: February 25, 2014, 09:22:15 PM »
So, factory service manuals... Not Haynes or Chilton's. Is alldatadiy good? A helm FSM is about $250 for my car, best used one I found was $180... Ouch. Anyone have experience with all data?

Offline ncjeeper

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #187 on: February 25, 2014, 09:59:27 PM »
All data kicks butt but not cost effective for the weekend mechanic to have access.

Offline cpf240

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #188 on: February 25, 2014, 10:37:02 PM »
Might want to check e-bay for manuals. I don't know if they are actually legal, but I've seen factory manuals on CDs/DVDs for very little money for various makes/models.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #189 on: February 26, 2014, 05:44:11 AM »
double post somehow...

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #190 on: February 26, 2014, 05:47:02 AM »
All data kicks butt but not cost effective for the weekend mechanic to have access.

for my car it would be $45 for 5 years, i realize this is the DIY version and not the pro 'shop' version. but the cheapest used one i can find is $180, and i didn't see any CDs at all... i'll keep looking though.

i really would like to pick something up because the support for the malibu sucks in the online community. all the forums i can find have hardly any response to my 'tough' DIY questions. most of the forums have stuff like 'i want to lower my car' or 'what shop should i take it to for this?' i asked a couple questions about the crank seal and had 0 responses for over a week, and then the one that did come back didn't help at all. i guess just a bunch of yuppie nancies drive them  ::)

i did find my ford one, pretty sure this is what i want:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1994-FORD-EXPLORER-RANGER-AEROSTAR-ORIGINAL-FACTORY-SERVICE-MANUALS-/360866347764

and i found it on CD for even cheaper, which i think might be better because i would imagine it is searchable and i can print off only what i need when i need it:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1994-Ford-Aerostar-Explorer-Ranger-Shop-Service-Repair-Manual-CD-Factory-OEM/360469989798?rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222002%26algo%3DSIC.FIT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D261%26meid%3D5108034663568615318%26pid%3D100005%26prg%3D1088%26rk%3D5%26rkt%3D5%26sd%3D360866347764%26

Offline JerseyVince

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #191 on: February 26, 2014, 11:42:27 AM »
So, factory service manuals... Not Haynes or Chilton's. Is alldatadiy good? A helm FSM is about $250 for my car, best used one I found was $180... Ouch. Anyone have experience with all data?

Did you go to helminc.com to look for your manuals? Factory manuals are expensive because they are good and have many tips/hidden diagnostic functions that many people don't know outside the dealer system(and some inside who never read the factory manuals at all) Alldata is good but there is no replacement for factory manuals and technical service bulletins(TSBs)

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #192 on: February 26, 2014, 11:48:41 AM »
yes, ranger stuff is out of stock and when i stock is $80, malibu is $200 for the main manual and $50 for the transmission manual. that's why i was asking about alldata. i could get the manuals for the ford off ebay, and i probably will, but i can't justify that price for the malibu.

Offline JerseyVince

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #193 on: February 26, 2014, 11:56:18 AM »
What year is the Malibu? I'll keep an eye out for manuals for it when I hit the car shows always guys selling manuals/books.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #194 on: February 26, 2014, 12:01:02 PM »
05, it's a malibu maxx, but i don't think they made a 'maxx' specific manual

Offline ChrisFox

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #195 on: February 26, 2014, 12:35:38 PM »
I bought the cd manual for my late Ford Ranger. It installs VMWare to run but I can print out sections so I can read it while I worked on the truck. The wiring diagrams are worth the price alone. I had lights that wouldn't come on. I followed the diagram and found out where they hooked up to another system that was corroded. Little electrical cleaner and problem solved. 

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #196 on: February 26, 2014, 01:02:15 PM »
good to hear, i'm pretty set on picking up the CD, i'll probably wait until next month as i have spent most of my fun/prep allowance for now and i don't have any major work coming up on it.

Offline ChrisFox

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #197 on: February 26, 2014, 03:01:32 PM »
If you had 96-99 I could send you mine. I won't be needing it anymore.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #198 on: February 26, 2014, 03:06:04 PM »
If you had 96-99 I could send you mine. I won't be needing it anymore.

i think 93-97 were the same generation... i could be wrong...

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #199 on: February 28, 2014, 05:59:34 PM »
Put a roll cage on the beast ;D


Offline ncjeeper

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #200 on: February 28, 2014, 06:43:53 PM »
I dont know whether to laugh or cry.  ::)

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #201 on: March 04, 2014, 04:09:31 PM »
laugh with me, my friend.

i started a thread on this but wanted the opinions of some of you guys that have helped me out on here...

so a little off topic but not too far: i'm looking for a project bike to fix up and ride. i found what seems to be a really sweet rolling chassis, an 86 honda vfr700 to be exact. the guy who has it says he recently bought it to fix it up and had it running. then when he had the top of the carbs off his roommate pushed it outside and it got rained on (just a few days ago), and the engine chamber got flooded and now it won't run, i'm sure because of the water. so that being said, even if it's not water in the crank case, is water a deal breaker for fixing? i wondered if i got it and cleaned everything up real well if it wouldn't matter since it hasn't been sitting in water for years (supposedly, i realize there's always a risk going into something like this).

Offline ncjeeper

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #202 on: March 04, 2014, 04:40:55 PM »
Im not a scooter guy, so cant really help you. But If it was a car/truck engine with water in it I would have to have it torn down to see what kind of water damage was done and that equals extra spent money. So unless this is a rare model or you get it SUPER cheap I would pass and look for a better platform to start with.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #203 on: March 04, 2014, 04:50:58 PM »
not too rare, but not too common, and yes, super cheap. it's a rolling chassis with a clean and clear title for $200. i've heard back a bit from some of the VFR guys and they're saying that it isn't a HUGE issue, and the price is definitely right given it's complete and just needs work.

Offline ncjeeper

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #204 on: March 04, 2014, 07:44:36 PM »
Ok. Worst case senerio. If you had to pay to have the engine rebuilt because of water damage would you still come out ahead? If so then go for it.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #205 on: March 04, 2014, 08:27:05 PM »
ahead, maybe. break even, maybe. i'm more interested in getting this fixed up for fun to keep. he did say he drained it so hopefully it is in good shape. i think absolute worst case i can part this bike out for what i will have paid and start looking again.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #206 on: March 04, 2014, 09:01:35 PM »
More work done on the car so time to share. This time I needed to replace a power mirror. The current one will move left and right but not up and down. In order to replace the mirror I had to remove the whole door panel. Let’s get started.

New mirror with wiring harness:



Door panel:



First the plastic trim around the handle has to come off. Using a screwdriver I pushed up on the inside and pulled out on the edges:



Here is a picture of it out so you can see the tabs that held it in place:



Next I needed to unplug the power mirror and lock switch. In order to do that the plastic insert they are in needed to be removed from the door. Again the handy screwdriver was put to work:



It pulls up and slides out, then there are two plugs that need to be removed, one for the window and one for the lock:



Tada!



Next there is a small panel behind the arm rest that pops off using a screwdriver:



Behind that panel was hiding two torx screws. Lucky for me I bought a bit set when I did the MAF sensor on my truck, I love having the tools I need on hand!



Once those are out then there are two more pins in the side of the door:



Use a small punch or screwdriver to push in the center of them:



Once the centers are pressed in you can pull them out, this is what they look like:



That center piece was actually pulled out as I took that picture when it was time to reinsert them.

Now all that’s left is to pop the door panel off. There is a door panel removal tool that you can buy, or just grab a chisel or putty knife and slide it in between the panel and the door frame. You are basically prying it out and popping loose the tabs that hold the panel in place:



This is why the whole panel has to be removed. This small section covers the bolts of the mirror, but the wiring harness plugs in behind the panel:





Once all of the tabs are loose the panel slides right up and off of the door:



There’s the harness plug, too bad they didn’t have it connect behind the smaller section:



And here are the three bolts that hold the mirror in place



Once those are removed the mirror pulls right out:



Reverse all of the steps and everything is put back together.

Now the fun part, I installed the new mirror and plugged it in and tested it before I put everything back together. This mirror also didn’t move up or down… so I guess after all that it is a wiring issue somewhere. I was wondering when my first one was going to pop up. Not sure when I’ll have the time to look into that or if I ever will since the horizontal motion is more important than the vertical (to me). But hey, at least I learned a little more and got to share with you fine people!

Offline ncjeeper

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #207 on: March 04, 2014, 11:13:27 PM »
Check the switch for that mirror. If its good then check the wires running to the mirror. A simple multimeter will be your friend for this.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #208 on: March 05, 2014, 07:00:22 AM »
Check the switch for that mirror. If its good then check the wires running to the mirror. A simple multimeter will be your friend for this.

yup, what i was thinking. the driver side mirror works left right and up and down, so i'm pretty sure it's not the actual adjusting switch. i have to change over another little button from 'R' to 'L', and i'm sure there is where the issue is. but my shocks and struts just came in so that is the next thing on the list, along with the axle and crankshaft seals. baby is due any day so those will probably have to wait a couple weeks before i can get to them and not be sleep deprived.

Offline Zef_66

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #209 on: March 05, 2014, 10:20:01 AM »
Ok. Worst case senerio. If you had to pay to have the engine rebuilt because of water damage would you still come out ahead? If so then go for it.

On the bike, for that price, I would probably pick it up. Take the chance and clean up the engine and try to get it running. If you can't and the motor is junk, you aren't out that much. And a rebuild probably isn't going to put it over the value of the bike. Overall, for the price, I don't think it's a bad deal. And you always have the option of finding a used motor to put in.