Author Topic: Cohutt 2014  (Read 73365 times)

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #90 on: May 14, 2014, 05:09:29 AM »
David In MN,
Thank you, experimenting keeps my interest and invariably I learn something from it, and usually not what I thought I would learn either....
I've learned that it's really too hot for watercress here in this setup except for early spring and late fall. I might try in a less exposed area of the yard one day-

With the push to prep the garden for show we sort of chilled over the past week, we have been gorging on diverse salads and enjoying decent strawberries - (admittedly,  mrs cohutt does have bird-like bones and her hands exaggerate the size of these). 



back to work this week, more planting/transplanting plus the blueberries/blackberries need to be covered as they berries are set and will be mockingbird fodder shortly if we don't move on it now.



Offline cohutt

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #91 on: May 17, 2014, 05:19:04 AM »
3 successive plantings of lettuce this year worked well.  This is a nice Bronze Arrowhead specimen from the middle planting..



And the front artichoke planting has at least 18 growing on it right now- mrs cohutt is pleased


Offline Cedar

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #92 on: May 17, 2014, 09:01:11 AM »
I want my artichokes to look like yours. How old are they? Second year plants? I started 72 of them of two varieties this year, but they are like 4" tall.

Cedar

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #93 on: May 17, 2014, 09:11:05 AM »
I want my artichokes to look like yours. How old are they? Second year plants? I started 72 of them of two varieties this year, but they are like 4" tall.

Cedar
3rd full year - I managed to over-winter the plants so they wasted little time/energy growing out foliage.   We'll get a bunch now through early to mid june then it gets so hot they pretty much go dormant. sometimes we get a choke or two int he fall as well

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #94 on: May 17, 2014, 09:19:21 AM »
Most of the time they will overwinter here, but yesterday when we went to town to get greenhouse supplies, I was noting all the 200' hedges and landscaping at the bank and other businesses which were deader than a doornail due to that weird freak cold & ice storm we had in February. So I am curious if they would have survived. I plan on putting these in the 20' space between the greenhouses.

Cedar

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #95 on: June 09, 2014, 05:27:36 AM »
Time has been scarce here with a handful of both unusual and unusual distractions.   
The transition from spring to to summer from a planting standpoint is pretty much done; some updates:

Mrs cohutt has consumed around 3 dozen artichokes from the two plants so far; it has warmed up here so production is pretty much done. What's left are the smaller side shoot chokes



I had never grown Tuscan kale before and added some this spring to have something "pretty" for the tour last month.   We've finally gotten around to eating some of this- much better texture and flavor vs the curly stuff, especially considering the warm temps that have set in.  Plus, it is an interesting color and texture that gets comments from everyone peeking into the garden



We've been gorging on the nice fava harvest and had some bonus garlic scapes to add to some dishes.  The "black" strips in the pasta dish are actually the first leaves of amethyst basil used this year.





Garlic- it is turning out to be an awesome year for all types planted. The harvest is almost done now, with only Chesnok Red remaining.

Inchelium Red (these are some of the largest bulbs I've ever grown).



Some of the harvest curing



My sister gave me some florence fennel seeds a while back.  I didn't think I was a fennel fan but planted some due to the interesting visual of the maturing plant. 



It turns out I liked the fennel- roasted along with everything else in a recent garden harvest roast-fest lol...



And the thornless blackberries are coming in by the boxcar this year- very large, tasty. These are about to be put through the food mill for jam:



We are blessed to have awakened a few years ago and now enjoy backyard harvests of as much healthy, tasty produce as we can consume.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #96 on: June 09, 2014, 07:43:42 AM »
Once again, you make me feel so far behind.

Braised fennel is one of my favorites and I eat it alot around a month or so from now. Olive oil, a touch of salt and braise it in the oven in a cast iron pan. I like chewing on fennel seed too. In Canada, I used to buy it candied and got addicted to the taste. I cannot find that down here, so I just chew on the seeds.

Your produce is looking very nice.

Cedar

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #97 on: June 09, 2014, 10:48:01 AM »
Wow, just wow.  Looks like another amazing year, Cohutt.  When I grow up I want to move somewhere that things can winter over.   ;)

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #98 on: June 09, 2014, 11:14:32 AM »
Once again, you make me feel so far behind.

Braised fennel is one of my favorites and I eat it alot around a month or so from now. Olive oil, a touch of salt and braise it in the oven in a cast iron pan. I like chewing on fennel seed too. In Canada, I used to buy it candied and got addicted to the taste. I cannot find that down here, so I just chew on the seeds.

Your produce is looking very nice.

Cedar

I'll second braised fennel. I heap it on homemade bread (ideally rye) with Greek yogurt. Of course the best use of any root vegetables is a Belgian waterzooi...

I'm getting a combination of envy and hunger...

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #99 on: June 09, 2014, 03:45:14 PM »
Thanks all.... 

Remember I generally only show the stuff that works out really well. ha


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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #100 on: June 09, 2014, 04:38:43 PM »
And yes, I did have to look up "waterzooi"....

For some scale and perspective, a phone pic through the glass of the sunroom, my view as I type this



It is 65 feet wide at the back fence, which is 140ish feet from the back window

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #101 on: September 15, 2014, 04:59:04 AM »
I did actually have a garden this summer, I promise.  Distractions, burnout and other projects got in the way of any real updates here or on the blog. 

The bad:  tomatoes had a difficult year locally due to blights of some sort or another and my garlic and shallots were hit by onion root maggots. 
The good:
Soy/edamame, eggplant, peppers & potatoes had very good years and my fall garden is in the ground currently under 40% shade cloth to get the seeds up / transplants established... Artichokes had a peak year and I've separated crowns and transplanted the the starts to start the 4 year cycle again..











I just

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #102 on: September 15, 2014, 11:18:17 PM »
Really amazing... love the eggplant photo. I finally have several eggplants in my garden as well... How do you like to cook them?

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #103 on: September 16, 2014, 04:52:21 AM »
This year is the eggplant year- 2 more plants with at least as many as this one plus two lower yielding Japanese style ones.
We are still learning how we like them best-
Generally I grill them- brushed with olive oil steeped with a generous amount of garlic, sliced long ways about 1/2- 5/8" thick, over the hottest my gas grill runs.  about 3-4 minutes per side.  Usually after turning the slices over once I'll coat the browned side with a mix of about 4-5 parts plain greek yogurt and 1 part fresh lemon juice.  (don't flip it again or the yogurt bonds it to the grill for all of time).
Some baba-ganoush occasionally, a few make on the fly pasta dishes with good garlic and shallots from the garden.
Also, I found someone at my church that loves them and also happens to sell eggs- we've traded a couple times so this works very well for someone with too many ripe eggplants...


Offline LvsChant

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #104 on: September 17, 2014, 07:41:28 AM »
eggs for eggplants... sounds like a great deal :)

Offline Roswell

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #105 on: September 17, 2014, 09:35:07 AM »
Your threads always make me feel lazy, jealous and hungry at the same time. Excellent work as always my friend.

Offline TexDaddy

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #106 on: September 17, 2014, 10:20:19 AM »
Really amazing... love the eggplant photo. I finally have several eggplants in my garden as well... How do you like to cook them?
Slice 'em. Dip 'em in corn meal and fry 'em.  8)

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #107 on: September 17, 2014, 12:04:59 PM »
Slice 'em. Dip 'em in corn meal and fry 'em.  8)

^^^ That's what I do.  And then Marinara for a dipping sauce

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #108 on: September 17, 2014, 01:47:23 PM »
Hmmm that sounds easy. Do you have to dip them first in beaten egg or something to make the cornmeal stick?

Offline TexDaddy

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #109 on: September 17, 2014, 03:46:18 PM »
I have never dipped them in anything. The cornmeal just sticks to the face of the slice.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #110 on: September 17, 2014, 09:53:13 PM »
I do enjoy your garden photos. One day I shall have a grove of artichokes as pretty as yours. I am an artichoke fiend and I have not been able to grow any since 1998 due to location and other issues.

Cedar

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #111 on: September 18, 2014, 04:36:07 AM »
(Thanks, I appreciate it)

Dividing the artichokes was easier than i thought it would be; they are pretty tough and any piece of the large stem roots off the stumps of previous years' harvests tends to survive and put up new shoots if kept moist. (But not soggy, as I learned the hard way...)

One of the transplanted stumps with new young shoots appearing:


Offline LvsChant

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #112 on: September 18, 2014, 08:57:44 AM »
nice... Mom planted artichokes in her yard this year...


Offline ResidentCelt

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #113 on: September 18, 2014, 02:39:13 PM »
Cohutt, your beds look so... clean. And organized. How do you keep pests/rodents/bad insects from destroying everything? I have to hide my beans in tall weeds to get anything from them and my tomatoes had to grow everywhere all tangled in a mess to keep the squirrels from stealing them all.

I have garden-envy again. Glad to see the bat house working out. Thankfully we have plenty of bats otherwise the skeeters would be a nightmare by us.

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #114 on: September 19, 2014, 04:58:19 AM »
Cohutt, your beds look so... clean. And organized. How do you keep pests/rodents/bad insects from destroying everything? I have to hide my beans in tall weeds to get anything from them and my tomatoes had to grow everywhere all tangled in a mess to keep the squirrels from stealing them all.

I have garden-envy again. Glad to see the bat house working out. Thankfully we have plenty of bats otherwise the skeeters would be a nightmare by us.

Selective photographic presentation is the secret to maintaining the illusion of clean and tidy beds.  If you look at the edges and in the background of these pics you catch a glimpse of the chaos beyond... 
Squirrels have been as issue this year - too many in the immediate area had a few of them surviving on the remnants of my tomatoes. 

The good news- an abundance always attracts attention if nature is left to have its way.
A red-tailed hawk came through to devour a snake a few days ago and noticed the tree rat population. Since then he's (she's?) been back for the rodential buffet more than once.  Sunday I watched from the house as the hawk spent a good 5 or 10 minutes after a squirrel it caught in the open that had run into a tomato cage for cover.  The good guy ultimately  won; it was awesome to watch but in the end pretty brutal....  (mrs cohutt wouldn't even let me finish the story of what I had witnessed).

My new favorite bird on the blackberry trellis with the snake snack:



And surveying the area afterwards



Unfortunately my camera and zoom lens were not handy for the hawk vs squirrel episode..

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #115 on: October 03, 2014, 05:34:52 PM »
With Halloween approaching, I figured out some uses for the 40 or so large gourds I grew in 2013.  These aren't fully finished yet but are on their way.  I have 10 little candleabra base snap in lights on switched cords that will illuminate them (the red eyed one in the dark was the test run of that concept).

You wouldn't believe what I've been offered for a couple of these... If I had started earlier I could have made a killing with a spot in the local fall arts and craft festival.











This one is big- 15 inches or so in diameter and will be a halloween candybowl; the kiddies will have to get their candy through an eye ;)




Offline Cedar

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #116 on: October 03, 2014, 05:37:44 PM »
THOSE ARE AWESOME!!!!! Really! Really! Really! Awesome! Side business!



And I like your Redtail Hawk as well.

Cedar


Offline cohutt

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #117 on: October 03, 2014, 07:39:47 PM »
Thanks Cedar.  :) 






Offline Nicodemus

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #118 on: October 10, 2014, 08:35:49 AM »
Jack Skellington! Nice!

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cohutt 2014
« Reply #119 on: October 12, 2014, 05:08:58 AM »
Jack Skellington! Nice!
I made a better jack skelligton in the meantime: