Author Topic: PCP Airguns  (Read 6030 times)

Offline Hiker

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PCP Airguns
« on: February 09, 2014, 07:59:21 PM »
Hello all.  I'm new here and am a big airgun fan.  I own the Shin Sung 9mm PCP air rifle and the Beeman RS2 with interchangeable barrels for .22 and .177 and am very happy with both of them.

I feel PCP's especially are a good survival prep weapon.   The shin sung can take down mid size game and, with a well placed shot, deer.   Although a PCP air rifle does not have the range of conventional firearms there are other advantages.   Cheaper, lighter, more abundant ammunition being one.  Not worrying about ammo being ruined by moisture is another.

It is extremely difficult to find conventional 22 ammo on the shelf these days.




Offline IKN

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Re: PCP Airguns
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2014, 09:18:01 AM »
As a hobby machinist as well, I'm becoming very interested in airguns as well.
I hope to, one day, get into making/modifying them as a small business.
Would like to hear from you on PCP's in the ares of your thought on the different charging methods, maintenance, short falls, advantages, etc.

Offline spartan

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Re: PCP Airguns
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2014, 01:11:58 PM »
I've been interested in PCP air rifles for a while, originally as a training tool for my children, but also the other long term possibility. 

What recommendations would you make for someone who wants to get started on a limited budget? 
Is there a particular caliber you see as offering the best value?

Offline Hiker

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Re: PCP Airguns
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2014, 05:43:18 PM »
As a hobby machinist as well, I'm becoming very interested in airguns as well.
I hope to, one day, get into making/modifying them as a small business.
Would like to hear from you on PCP's in the ares of your thought on the different charging methods, maintenance, short falls, advantages, etc.

Charging methods are 3 stage and 4 stage hand pumps,  SCUBA tanks, and high pressure air compressors.   The hand pump is the cheapest and most portable.    Air compressors and SCUBA are nice but in the event of grid failure/ bug out scenario would be useless

When I was shopping I had in mind what type of weapon would be most reliable and last longest in a survival bug out/ grid down situation and for me personally I chose air rifles.    Conventional firearms have longer range and more power but there is an ammunition shortage and prices are skyrocketing and you are limited in the quantities you can buy.   In a bug out situation you would be able to carry much more pellet ammo than conventional.

Also was the concern about the ammo getting wet, which, if it seeps in through the casing, could render the ammo useless.

Advantages of pellet ammo are:  cheaper, lighter, take up only a fraction of the space that conventional ammo does and also (there is a difference of opinion on this subject) if you find your pellets on the ground and they are not deformed, the can be cleaned and re-used.

There is a debate about re-using pellet ammo.   Every one has his opinion but I have cleaned and re-used pellets that were not deformed and they fired just fine.

Maintenance is simple.   Regular barrel cleaning and corrosion protection with gun oil.  PCP air guns should be kept charged at all times to protect the seals.

For survival hunting my 22 caliber Beeman RS2 is good for small game and the 9mm PCP is good for mid-sized,and, with a good shot, deer.

Offline IKN

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Re: PCP Airguns
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2014, 06:09:35 PM »
I've read and seen videos where they discuss and/or demonstrate "Dieseling" various air rifles.
I can only assume this applies to PCP's as well. Is there a special oil used for corrosion protection on the inside of the barrels that's not subject to diesleing ???
Or is dieseling a non-issue with PCP's ???
From a customizing frame of mind, is there something you'd like to have/see for your airguns that's currently not available ???

Offline Scottman

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Re: PCP Airguns
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2014, 06:14:47 PM »
The marauder with the auto indexing feature would be a great training tool. IN 177 inexpensive to plink with also. If you spent 25 bucks a week in a month you'd have quite a collection of pellets.

Offline Hiker

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Re: PCP Airguns
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2014, 06:34:08 PM »
I've been interested in PCP air rifles for a while, originally as a training tool for my children, but also the other long term possibility. 

What recommendations would you make for someone who wants to get started on a limited budget? 
Is there a particular caliber you see as offering the best value?

The large bore Shin Sung cost me $595 plus $275 for the pump.   The Benjamin Marauder .22 caliber is cheaper at around $300 and is a repeater.  It has a detachable shoulder stock and can be carried in a backpack.

 However, if you are on a very tight budget and looking for something that can be used to train your children and can be used for small game hunting in a bug out scenario an excellent deal is the Beeman RS2 Silver Kodiak.

The Beeman RS2 is not a PCP though.  It is a spring piston but is very powerful, accurate, and affordable.  It has interchangeable barrels for .177 and .22 so you are getting two guns for the price of one.   The barrels detach very quickly so the Beeman can be carried in a backpack.   It shoots around 1000 fps in .177 and 800 fps in .22.   This rifle has a good kick to it.

I got mine at Wal Mart for only $100.

Here is a demo on the SMX Beeman, which is essentially the same as the RS2 Silver Kodiak except that it has a 2 stage trigger.

http://www.blinkx.com/watch-video/review-dual-caliber-air-rifle-177-and-22-smk-beeman/CQtPlzkRdvoeUsiR-GMowg

Offline Hiker

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Re: PCP Airguns
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2014, 07:16:10 PM »
I've read and seen videos where they discuss and/or demonstrate "Dieseling" various air rifles.
I can only assume this applies to PCP's as well. Is there a special oil used for corrosion protection on the inside of the barrels that's not subject to diesleing ???
Or is dieseling a non-issue with PCP's ???
From a customizing frame of mind, is there something you'd like to have/see for your airguns that's currently not available ???

Personally, I feel that the debate on dieseling involves a lot of exaggeration.  The videos I have seen on the subject show people actually filling the pellet with oil when it is in the chamber and then it simply produces a lot of smoke.

Dieseling is caused by using too much oil.  Having fired thousands of pellet rounds I have never seen a problem with dieseling.   Even if a fire did start by some freak chance all one would have to do is quickly put the barrel to the ground or cover it with a cloth to cut off the air supply.

From a customizing point my 9 mm PCP is single shot and it would be cool if they could make it into repeating.   

Offline sharpshooterofky

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Re: PCP Airguns
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2018, 10:26:06 AM »
For young people (crap for old folks too!)

If you want a introductory type of PCP, I'd recommend the Benjamin Wildfire in 177.

It's on sale for $99.99, that's hard to beat.  It uses only 2000 psi, and gets up to 60 shots per fill (I think that's stretching it, I'd say 40 maybe).  12 round magazine, and it'll shoot as fast as you can pull the trigger.

Just my 2 cents (worth about $.0001)

Benjamin Wildfire
https://www.pyramydair.com/s/m/Benjamin_Wildfire_PCP_Air_Rifle/4304/8306