Author Topic: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild  (Read 41635 times)

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #60 on: July 07, 2014, 09:23:51 AM »
Pretty sure that would get me no lovin' for a long time... although she does work some days and I'm home with the kids by myself...

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #61 on: March 18, 2015, 08:22:17 AM »
Zombie time, reviving this thread! I cannot believe it's been this long since I've touched this engine, but life happens. I am going to start designating Tuesday nights as my 'bike night' since I'm usually working on school all day. It's a good way to wind down and it puts time on the calendar for getting this done.

I got the front head off last night and started working on the transmission. Of the three bolts holding the bearing bracket two of the heads sheared off... not too happy about that. I guess the best way to remove them will be to drill a hole and use one of those special extraction bits?

I got about 75% of the crank case bolts out, but there are some larger ones on the bottom that were really stuck. I hit them with some PB Blaster and will do that for the next week. It also doesn't help that the engine is upside down and leverage is not really working for me since the engine is wobbling around.


Offline archer

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #62 on: March 18, 2015, 09:08:39 AM »
good luck/skill!

Offline kckndrgn

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #63 on: March 18, 2015, 09:23:12 AM »
I got the front head off last night and started working on the transmission. Of the three bolts holding the bearing bracket two of the heads sheared off... not too happy about that. I guess the best way to remove them will be to drill a hole and use one of those special extraction bits?
You can try, I've never had much luck with them.  Try soaking the broken bolts in PB Blaster and using heat on the body (not too much).  Sometime heating/cooling can break the stuck bolts free.

I got about 75% of the crank case bolts out, but there are some larger ones on the bottom that were really stuck. I hit them with some PB Blaster and will do that for the next week. It also doesn't help that the engine is upside down and leverage is not really working for me since the engine is wobbling around.

Never fun working with an unstable piece. Try rigging up some wood to make a solid base.  Having it wobble around may be asking for trouble.  Try using some heat on the stuck bolts as well, usually works for me.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #64 on: March 18, 2015, 11:13:31 AM »
You can try, I've never had much luck with them.  Try soaking the broken bolts in PB Blaster and using heat on the body (not too much).  Sometime heating/cooling can break the stuck bolts free.

Never fun working with an unstable piece. Try rigging up some wood to make a solid base.  Having it wobble around may be asking for trouble.  Try using some heat on the stuck bolts as well, usually works for me.

I'll try the PB Blaster after I get the gears out, I don't want to soak the bearings in that stuff. Also the heads are gone... so the heat is probably a good idea coupled with the extractors... not sure how else I would get them out.

And I do have some wood scraps around that I'm going to try and do something with, I don't feel like hurting myself or dropping the engine on my foot.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #65 on: March 18, 2015, 11:39:40 PM »
Put the engine on it's side tonight and got all but two of the bolts loose. The last two are stubborn and leverage is difficult. I bought a heat gun to see if hitting it with that will help. Should arrive Friday so maybe Saturday I can give it a shot.

Offline kckndrgn

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #66 on: March 19, 2015, 07:26:10 AM »
I've always just used a propane torch, just being careful not to over heat the area.

If push comes to shove on the broken bolts, taking it to the a good machine shop or repair center and have them drill out and tap the holes.  I've had to do that before.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #67 on: March 19, 2015, 03:05:25 PM »
With the bits of oil still in there I'd be very hesitant to use a torch.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #68 on: March 23, 2015, 08:27:48 AM »
So after a steady diet of heat, PB Blaster, and some gentle tapping with a hammer and wood, I have gotten all of the bolts loose except one that won't budge. I've broken one socket and am close to either breaking a second or stripping the bolt head and I really don't want to do that.

Any other ideas?

I am really thinking I may need an impact wrench to break the bolt loose. Any reason why I shouldn't do this?

Offline kckndrgn

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #69 on: March 23, 2015, 08:33:00 AM »
I would try the impact wrench, nothing to loose really.

Have you tried using a "cheater" bar to get more leverage on the socket?  Been several times just adding a about 2' of pipe to the handle on the socket handle gave me the extra umph needed.

I know on my current build project the impact wrench has come in quite handy, so nothing wrong with "needing" to add a new tool to the tool box.   ;D

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #70 on: March 23, 2015, 09:44:52 AM »
I'd love to buy one, but I just bought a new socket set since I broke the one and it was am excuse/reason to get deep sockets as well (I do need to get the spark plugs out after all). I have been using an 18" breaker bar and that is what got all the other bolts out.

I have a few friends with them, or I may see if the auto store rents them. I know years ago my dad rented an impact wrench. I could pick it up after work, break that bolt loose and then take it back the next day.

Offline Carl

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Offline kckndrgn

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #72 on: March 23, 2015, 07:14:36 PM »
Well now, that's an interesting tool.  Might come in handy in an emergency.  Adding it to my wish list.

Offline ChrisFox

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #73 on: March 23, 2015, 10:42:50 PM »
Stuck bolts are the bane of any wrench turner. Last job I was on, we had a 1 inch drive breaker bar and a 12 foot cheater pipe. One good heave to and finally got it to move.

Offline Carl

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #74 on: March 23, 2015, 11:11:02 PM »
Stuck bolts are the bane of any wrench turner. Last job I was on, we had a 1 inch drive breaker bar and a 12 foot cheater pipe. One good heave to and finally got it to move.

The bolt ,or the vehicle MOVED?  :)

Offline Greekman

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #75 on: March 24, 2015, 02:07:09 AM »
How about a IMPACT DRIVER that is hit with a hammer rather than air driven?
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000NPPATS/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_1?pf_rd_p=1944687662&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B0006V2GPU&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1R7GYES0TAFQQTMWZZW7

its use is d efacto when removing car door hinges from the frame. infact i did that when reclaiming the doors of a beater for my almost Antique former car

Stuck bolts are the bane of any wrench turner. Last job I was on, we had a 1 inch drive breaker bar and a 12 foot cheater pipe. One good heave to and finally got it to move.

hmmm that much torque...Can the bolt edges bear it?

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #76 on: March 24, 2015, 09:43:58 AM »
Carl that is great! I didn't know they made manual drivers and that is perfect for me. I couldn't find a rental anywhere and was seriously considering buying an electric one, using it nicely for the one bolt, and returning it. This is a much better option and doesn't make me get into a moral gray area.

They've even got a half inch drive for a few bucks less, and I have some really nice Tekton impact adapters so I think I'll be going with that one. The socket set I just ordered was Tekton as well. For the shade tree mechanic like myself I think they are great tools. I only wish I'd known about this tool a few days ago so I could have it today. Tuesday are my bike day so this might have to get put off...

So close and yet so far... :(

Offline Carl

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #77 on: March 24, 2015, 09:56:10 AM »
Carl that is great! I didn't know they made manual drivers and that is perfect for me. I couldn't find a rental anywhere and was seriously considering buying an electric one, using it nicely for the one bolt, and returning it. This is a much better option and doesn't make me get into a moral gray area.

They've even got a half inch drive for a few bucks less, and I have some really nice Tekton impact adapters so I think I'll be going with that one. The socket set I just ordered was Tekton as well. For the shade tree mechanic like myself I think they are great tools. I only wish I'd known about this tool a few days ago so I could have it today. Tuesday are my bike day so this might have to get put off...

So close and yet so far... :(

The 'shock' from the hammer and spin it imparts are maybe not as fast as an air -impact but it has worked for me as I got,and still have,my first one after about 40 years...it has saved my beans a number of times. It does take a bit of room for hammer swing but it is very effective.

I added an image that you ,and others may find helpful...I can't give credit 'cause I don't know where it came from.


Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #78 on: March 24, 2015, 09:59:40 AM »
Nice, looks like I'm about to be a chemist!

Offline ncjeeper

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #79 on: March 24, 2015, 12:37:00 PM »
I have been using that 50/50 penetrating mix for awhile now also.

Offline gopack84

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #80 on: March 24, 2015, 01:16:48 PM »
My dad was a career mechanic in a plant that made household C/D/AA type batteries. In fact, I remember when they brought the AA production line up but I digress.

He always had a manual impact driver like that. In fact it's sitting in my garage now because he gave me most of his tool set when he retired. He had said that thing was a life saver (or at least a knuckle saver) on many occasions.

Offline Carl

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #81 on: March 24, 2015, 02:27:53 PM »
I have been using that 50/50 penetrating mix for awhile now also.

Is your jeep an example?

Offline ChrisFox

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #82 on: March 24, 2015, 09:37:14 PM »
The bolt ,or the vehicle MOVED?  :)

It was a 44mm bolt for the footer on a amusement ride that had the salt air of the Gulf on it for 3 years. It took some talking to. 

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #83 on: March 27, 2015, 10:03:54 AM »
Well... the manual driver came in and I tried it out. Tool feels solid and I like it, but that bolt wouldn't budge... I'm really at a loss now of what to do... I guess the next step would be an electric or air impact wrench?

Offline kckndrgn

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #84 on: March 27, 2015, 10:36:25 AM »
Well, did you see if anyplace had a rental on the impact wrench?  If I were local you could use mine (and the compressor if needed :) ).

Maybe an option would be to find a garage or mechanic and take the engine to them and have them remove that stubborn bolt?

I know on my rebuild of my ATV, it took several tries with the impact wrench to get a bolt off of the pinion gear. When it finally came free I was scared to look thinking the bolt/gear sheared off instead of the bolt coming free.

Good luck

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #85 on: March 27, 2015, 10:41:08 AM »
Well, did you see if anyplace had a rental on the impact wrench?  If I were local you could use mine (and the compressor if needed :) ).

Maybe an option would be to find a garage or mechanic and take the engine to them and have them remove that stubborn bolt?

I know on my rebuild of my ATV, it took several tries with the impact wrench to get a bolt off of the pinion gear. When it finally came free I was scared to look thinking the bolt/gear sheared off instead of the bolt coming free.

Good luck

I already checked rentals and there are none at the auto stores (those are usually free). Home Depot might, I'm going to check there, but I live far enough away that a rental fee + return trip usually equals close to the cost of a tool. I wish I knew someone with a wrench. I've thought about taking the engine to a shop, I may go that route now that this hasn't worked... Oh well, another tool in the box at least.

Offline ncjeeper

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #86 on: March 27, 2015, 12:24:33 PM »
Any pawn shops around you. You might be able to pick an impact cheap that way. Heck you could use it and then pawn it back to then if you really wanted to.  :D

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #87 on: March 27, 2015, 01:56:13 PM »
Pawn shops are around, just not too many on my side of town.

I stopped by a bike dealership/service center today. The service manager is really cool and I spoke to him last year when I started the project. When I mentioned the bike he remembered me. He said I'm more than welcome to bring the engine case by and have them give it a go with their tools. That's great because I was going to take it by there anyways and have them look over the cylinders and pistons so I can kill two birds with one stone this way.

Offline kckndrgn

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #88 on: March 27, 2015, 03:09:19 PM »
I stopped by a bike dealership/service center today. The service manager is really cool and I spoke to him last year when I started the project. When I mentioned the bike he remembered me. He said I'm more than welcome to bring the engine case by and have them give it a go with their tools. That's great because I was going to take it by there anyways and have them look over the cylinders and pistons so I can kill two birds with one stone this way.

Awesome news!

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: 1986 Honda VFR 700 Rebuild
« Reply #89 on: April 06, 2015, 01:12:35 PM »
well... sadly the project is dead. pistons are shot and all cylinders need to be re-bored... too cost prohibitive at this point to do anything. Looks like I'm parting it out.