Author Topic: Lessons Learned on my Recent Camping Trip  (Read 15433 times)

nelson96

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Re: Lessons Learned on my Recent Camping Trip
« Reply #30 on: May 05, 2014, 12:03:12 PM »
Loss of feeling was not one of my symptoms.  It was reported by one of the people leading the trip, who uses his poles extensively, and who's physical fitness I would in no way question.

I was speaking more toward his experience, and I would question his physical fitness if he has circulatory issues.

Offline Greekman

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Re: Lessons Learned on my Recent Camping Trip
« Reply #31 on: May 05, 2014, 12:17:59 PM »
Could it be that hsi apck was adjusted with too much weight on his shoulders than in his hips?

nelson96

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Re: Lessons Learned on my Recent Camping Trip
« Reply #32 on: May 05, 2014, 12:19:59 PM »
Could it be that his pack was adjusted with too much weight on his shoulders than in his hips?

It certainly could.

Offline inconel710

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Re: Lessons Learned on my Recent Camping Trip
« Reply #33 on: May 05, 2014, 12:20:40 PM »
Agreed.  Another lesson learned from all of this is some real solid respect for the physicality of backpackers, soldiers, and old mountain men.

I want to continue to improve my fitness level through MA, day hikes, and maybe wind-sprints/weight training.  I'd like to be able to do a marathon with no pack as well.

But I still think that a GHB as large as my backpacking bag would be problematic, even if I was mostly dealing with flat terrain.

Also, from what my teacher was saying, if you keep your sleeping bag stored all bunched up in your bag (be it down or synthetic), you're basically killing the bag's ability to keep you warm.

Going with a space blanket or two, alone, is going to save a lot of weight and space, and may well work better.

I'm curious about trying a hamok and tarp setup.  That should help keep me cool/warm depending on the season (due to not being in contact with the ground), and help keep the bugs off of me more than sleeping on the ground would.

If you're referring to using a space blanket in your GHB, I think you're on the right track (since I'm on the same one).  I plan on clothing being my primary sleep system in that scenario with a Grabbers space blanket for ground cover/shelter.

I'm a novice hammock camper.  I've found it to be generally cooler than sleeping on the ground.  My last night in a hammock (back in April), the temps got down below freezing and I stayed pretty comfortable.  However, I had a USGI poncho liner rigged up as an underquilt, a double layer hammock to cut the wind even further, a GI Gore-Tex bivy bag, a Thermarest foam pad, and the black mummy bag from the military sleep system.  It's a heavy and bulky rig because I'm using mostly cheap milsurplus items.  My tarp is a cheap Sportsmans Guide silnylon tarp.  What really put it over the top was a couple of hand warmers thrown in the bag before I changed clothes for the night.  Hammockforums.com is a great place to learn more (that's where I found the instructions for the poncho liner underquilt or PLUQ as they call it).

I hear you about hand swelling.  I found that using a waist belt, cinched tight, and loosening the shoulder straps helped alot.  The waist belt transfers the pack weight to your hips, reducing the weight on the shoulder straps.  Those can then be loosened until they're just tight enough for comfort.

Offline Josh the Aspie

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Re: Lessons Learned on my Recent Camping Trip
« Reply #34 on: May 05, 2014, 02:34:52 PM »
If you're referring to using a space blanket in your GHB, I think you're on the right track (since I'm on the same one).

I was.  I already have a couple in my vehicle's tool kit.