Author Topic: Pandemic supplies  (Read 15812 times)

Offline mountainmoma

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Pandemic supplies
« on: August 07, 2014, 10:50:52 PM »
sorry if this is a repeat, but I cant find a thread. If there is an older one, just show me where and we'll get rid of this one.

So, what is the minimal supplies to shelter in place in a pandemic and/or care for a family member if needed ? What would be good supplies to have on hand ?

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2014, 11:42:42 PM »
Let me start the list with plastic sheeting, duct tape, bleach or pool shock (to make bleach), latex gloves (or the non-latex type if your allergic), face mask, eye protection

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2014, 10:22:23 AM »
I would add to the list : heavier duty rubber cleaning gloves to put over the latex when needing to cleanup, buckets(s), rags, plastic bags, paper towels (I actually dont own any papertowels -- might be good to have a few rolls for a variety of potential emergency scenarios)

ANd, a question: Would a tyvek suit, which are cheap, stop vomit/sneeze etc... wetness carrying virus/bacteria? Otherwise, there is alot of clothes changes and laundry , with potential contamination, if you need to care for a family member or give humanitarian aid to a neighbor of some minimal type...

Offline bcksknr

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2014, 10:47:18 AM »
     In the coverage of hospital workers in Africa, Tyvek suits were mentioned, I have a friend who does asbestos removal and they wear Tyvek. I've also seen a couple of videos on how to make your own bivy bags using Tyvek. Don't forget waterproof, disposable footwear, in case you step in bodily fluids. I would imagine you could disinfect plastic or rubber items with a bleach solution. On one news video, it looked like suited health workers were being sprayed down with a solution before undressing. It looked like a decontamination area where a worker was disinfecting equipment with a spray for future reuse, as goggles and other items were hanging on a rack behind him. I guess rubber boots could be sprayed and reused. I've seen some footage where it looked like the patients themselves were being spayed with a disinfectant. I'd get one of those 2 or 3 gallon garden sprayers. Maybe there is something more effective than bleach?
     Most large building supply stores and paint stores sell Tyvek coveralls and respirator of various types.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2014, 10:55:50 AM »
I have heard mention elsewhere of a difference between N95 and N100 masks. I have a bunch of N95's already, so wont change out, but what is the difference, and should someone reading this send away for N100 vs picking up the N95's ?

Seems that we can make a list of cheap, functional stuff to minimally have on hand (compared to premade "kits")

As get home stuff, what would this be ? A list start : hand sanatizer, put on double latex gloves, N95 mask, some type of googles. Stay away from people. get home. What are good, relatively inexpensive googles ? For longer commutes, I would think breathability or non-fogging or ft over glasses....any recomendations for folks ?

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2014, 11:16:13 AM »
Gatoraide and/or other electrolyte replacement drinks
Soda crackers
Chicken bullion
Ear loop masks*



*this is not an airborne virus.  I've worn N95 masks while mitigating some mouse feces with the risk of Hanta Virus.  They become wet and therefore worthless in under an hour of hard work and are uncomfortable to wear.  What you want is protection from droplets and something to remind you not to touch your nose and mouth.  Ear loop masks are cheaper, easier to wear for long periods of time and do what is needed in this case.

nkawtg

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2014, 11:19:45 AM »
For Ebola, just being in your car is fine (unless said car is contaminated), no additional protection is required. If it goes airborne a decent mask would be fine while in the car I would think.

For sure staying away from people is the best prevention.

The hard part for many of us would be a prolonged quarantine keeping us away from our jobs and a paycheck.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2014, 12:01:09 PM »
Tyvek suits were mentioned,

I have/had a couple. I used them as bee suits.

Cedar

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2014, 01:47:54 PM »
Situational materials.  Do you have contingency plans for these things and will it require any special materials?  Going out shopping after the outbreak starts is unwise and unpleasant.  The obvious is the grocery store, but I imagine the hardware store will get hit also.

Our neighbors are on board with the prepping.  We plan on locking the front doors and front gates to the back yards and cutting a hole in the fence between our backyards if we ever need to quarantine up. Hmmm...this might be an excuse to buy some field phones.  Somewhere in the garage I have an old spool of commo wire.  Yes, I have wire designed for phones I dont have.  I may have a problem. Some think its a pathological inability to get rid of military things...I think I am suffering from a severe lack of field phones.  Heck I have Motorola handi-talkies and two hand-held FM transceivers but field phones are retro.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2014, 02:10:37 PM »
Situational materials.  Do you have contingency plans for these things and will it require any special materials?  Going out shopping after the outbreak starts is unwise and unpleasant. 

exactly. The time to think is before, so now. SO, this is the reminder to do it now. Mostly we all probably have everything or most things, so just recheck. For example, I should get some paper towels and check my pantry for premade foods good for sick people (I have tons of food, but I cook homemade and may be short on premade broths.crackers/soups -- even if I make my own and store, something premade should be stored). I might want to make sure at least a loop mask or two are in all our car glove boxes, etc....

Chemsoldier, you've thought about this alot, anything to add to the must have list ?

Offline bcksknr

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2014, 08:04:17 AM »
     This is an unpleasant topic, but reality is what it is. Back during the run-up to Y2K, two of our neighborhood concerns were disposal of garbage and waste, and how to deal with the dead (if that should become necessary). In a pandemic people are going to die, perhaps friends, family or loved ones. As has been seen in Africa, proper handling and burial of the dead is critical to preventing the spread of Ebola. Assuming that the regular systems for dealing with these issues will be overwhelmed and you may want to remain isolated from the population, you should have a plan to deal with the deceased.
     Any unprotected physical contact is dangerous; the same precautions for handling the sick must be observed in handling the deceased. Any materials that may have come into contact with bodily fluids must be sterilized or burnt. I don't know many who store body bags, but impermeable bags (perhaps contractor plastic bags and duct tape) of some sort would be an idea. As traumatic as a death would be, you must remember that any direct contact with bodily fluids will probably transfer the virus. Some plan for rapid burial should be in place. I believe dusting with lime powder (calcium hydroxide) has been used traditionally, to help sterilize graves.
     In the event that burial isn't possible an alternative might be cremation. Either gasoline or the more traditional wood fire are possibilities. I know that this is a distressing topic, but unless some thought is given to the situation, a dignified yet safe send-off to the deceased may be difficult, but must be done. The dead cannot just be left to decompose and spread further disease.
     If you are attempting to isolate in place, give some thought also to disposal of waste and garbage. In a full blown pandemic, who knows what services may be disabled? Are you rural or urban? Can you burn or bury waste in a safe manner? Uncollected garbage can attract vermin and add to the misery, not to mention spreading other diseases. These situations may seem far-fetched (even during the "Spanish Flu" of 1918, society didn't break down), but to me giving some thought to even unlikely events is what preparedness is all about.   

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2014, 02:43:38 PM »
What are your plans?  Those pre-analyzed courses of action will help you prepare and help you act decisively when the crisis hits.  That will help you determine your preparation.

For a pandemic I suggest taking a look at this article from Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy
http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-sick-room/

While I have not the experience, training or materials to treat a real beastie like Ebola or Smallpox, I will not simply write off a family member so I will try to treat them as best I can.  If it costs me my life, so be it.

Learn how to provide supportive care, its the best you can do in most viral outbreaks anyway.  Quarantine as best you can to delay when you get exposed.  Many pathogens lose potency over generations and you can have better outcomes the long you go before infection.  Have lots of masks, gloves, etc.  Bleach and a sponge kills lots of stuff.  Delivery to your door can be relatively safe. I have two little ones and we get milk delivered.  While a pandemic would likely shut down such service, from my end I see it as pretty safe.  A quick wipe down with bleach and I have no issues with it in my house.  FWIW, Amazon also delivery about anything.  That may have some utility before the insanity really starts.  At least it might keep you out of the stores during the initial panic.   If you can swing it, having an alliance that lets you have some assurance that your kids will be taken care of if you and your spouse/partner goes down.  Heh, I guess I just said to prepare with logistics and community.  Which sounds a lot like preparing for any threat!

Plastic matress covers, oral rehydration supplies and the know how to use it.  IV therapy if you can swing the training.  Learn how to make a cholera bed (don't get one), look it up, yech.  Diarrhea producing diseases are the biggest threat in my opinion.  If Captain Trips does sweep through the world, cholera and the like will follow it as basic sanitation breaks down.

Don't focus on Ebola, its not nearly the threat some claim.  Just harness the fear it causes to push you to get ready for pandemic disease in general which is a real threat.  Focus on things that effectively don't go bad.  These things don't seem to happen very often and the potential for mal-investment is high.  You are getting ready which is key.  Think about it, read about it (non-sensational accounts).  Diseases can be very scary and developing some degree of familiarity and knowledge is a step in dealing with the fear, if you find yourself getting really freaked with your research, stop.  Getting more worked up is counter-productive.  I am told many medical students go through a hypochondriac stage as they start to learn all the things that can go wrong with the human body.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2014, 03:24:45 PM »
Great site ! They have another article here, http://www.doomandbloom.net/ebola-the-next-great-pandemic/?, and say they will have a more complete list of supplies to have at home soon, most will be ones we have all stated here, Im sure. And, their existing articles already cover real well.

I dont have fear, I find that when I logically look at something like this, try and understand it, and do minimal thought or prep, I no longer worry about any of it. I did not pay much attention during the last medical potential pandemic scares 5 years ago, and I am in general not that medical of a thinker, so this is a good oportunity to think of what minimalistic, cheap things to have on hand. I am also thinking other new people here could be calmed by a nice logical train of thought on this thread of what to do ahead.

I called my eldest daughter, and while she does not, and likely will not have a bunch of stuff at home, she just went out and spent $14 at her local hardware store to buy a couple things that she should have had at her house already, and that will be useful for  any number of things that could go wrong (she is young and has only been in her own household for a year). Basically, a mask or gloves are easy to get now, are things that are useful for any number of household issues, and if the American public ever panics, will not be found on any store shelves.

Now, this contrasts with a good friend and neighbor that MUST have alot of fear about many things, even fire evac. or storm prep, very likely events for this neighborhood that have been big issues in the past, she will NOT think about. She says, I dont worry about that stuff......I have told her, well I dont worry about it for sure, as I think we are prepared to at least some degree. I think, of course, that she is too scared to look at anything that could go wrong. And, for now, she clings to misinformation. But, when people like her actually HAVE to think about any of it, they will feel scared, and entitled, and wonder why "someone" hasnt taken care of it....

And, thank you, chemsoldier, for good items for the running list :

Picking out which room will be the sick room, if need be
planning now
learn how to treat any bad sickness, similar for ebola, bird flu, etc...
Plastic mattress protector for the pre-identified sick room bed

And, from the Aug 6th Doom and Bloom article ".... WHAT YOU SHOULD DO
Ebola virus is a highly contagious infectious disease. The first thing that you should do now, before the disaster has hit your area is to make a plan. This plan should involve:
1. Choosing an isolation room
2. Learning to identify symptoms of someone with Ebola (as described above)
3. Not cutting corners when it comes to washing and disinfecting (it probably has caused a lot of health workers their lives in West Africa)
4. Stockpiling food and medical supplies, including dedicated eating utensils, bedding, waste disposal materials, etc. for the sick.
5. Having a means of communication if the grid goes down (hand-cranked radios, etc.)
6. Considering safe ways to dispose of infected materials.
 
Picking an isolation room in your home is an important consideration, especially if you aren’t confident that medical help will be forthcoming. The room should be at one end of your domicile, have good light and a window for ventilation. You might, however, want to cover the air ducts in the room.
 
For in-depth information on putting together the survival sick room, check out my article on the subject at: http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-sick-room
 
I recommend stocking up on masks, coveralls, eye protection, shoe covers, and gloves.  Special masks called “N95? and “N100? are especially useful but a full body suit would be much more protective. I’ll be outlining a full pandemic kit in an article in the next few days.
 
A series of medications to serve as decongestants, fever reducers, and anti-diarrheal agents will be useful. It is especially important to have dedicated bedding and utensils for patient use only. Chlorine bleach is thought to kill Ebola, so have a good supply to disinfect countertops, doorknobs, and other surfaces...."
 
« Last Edit: August 09, 2014, 03:32:57 PM by mountainmoma »

Offline chad

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #13 on: August 10, 2014, 09:56:20 AM »
oral rehydration supplies... anybody have a homebrew?

I'm thinking it's just water,salt and sugar maybe honey.

Something along the lines of; 1qt water, "x" salt, "x" sugar...

Offline Cedar

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #14 on: August 10, 2014, 10:03:22 AM »
Homemade Pedialyte Recipe
Mix together:

    1 quart water
    2 tablespoons sugar
    1/2 teaspoon salt

Cedar

Offline doublehelix

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #15 on: August 10, 2014, 10:06:11 AM »
I have/had a couple. I used them as bee suits.

Cedar

Tychem are MUCH better than plain Tyvek.

Easier to decon.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #16 on: August 10, 2014, 10:18:37 AM »
Any materials that may have come into contact with bodily fluids must be sterilized or burnt.

Unless it was metal or glass, I would burn every time. Dig a deep pit and burn it all in there. When I bought my farm in Canada, the lady who owned it before me was a hoarder. You can burn alot in a pit in a year.

I don't know many who store body bags, but impermeable bags (perhaps contractor plastic bags and duct tape) of some sort would be an idea.

We do this at the vet offices. Contractor bags, but we tie them off at the top on themselves. We only had to use two bags on really large dogs,like Great Danes, so it would be similar for people. We used porus tape to tape the bags together in the middle. Usually no leaks. Then they went into the freezer until cremation.

I believe dusting with lime powder (calcium hydroxide) has been used traditionally, to help sterilize graves.
In the event that burial isn't possible an alternative might be cremation. Either gasoline or the more traditional wood fire are possibilities. Can you burn or bury waste in a safe manner?

The dead animal should be covered with hydrated lime, and then covered with at least 4’ of soil mounded up to allow for settling as the carcass decomposes [ORS 601.090(7)]. Burials should be at least 500’ from surface waters or wells, preferably downhill from the well. Burial of large dead animals will probably require a backhoe because an adult cow burial takes a hole approximately 2’ x 7’ x 8’ deep.
http://extension.oregonstate.edu/coos/agriculture/DeadAnimalDisposal

Honestly I would burn. Family member or not. They are dead. I am not going to risk others, I would think they would not want me to. If it was me dead, keep me from getting someone else sick. Burn me.

I would use gasoline/diesel, tires and wood, unless I do not want to create attention with really black smoke. We had an incinerator at the zoo I worked at, it was made from 2-hole concrete blocks.

Can you burn or bury waste in a safe manner?

Chickens and rabbits which I have questioned why they died and I am worried it might be contagious, I toss into a burning barrel. (I have alot of people who have me treat their sick rabbits or put them down).

Cedar

Offline Nurse Amy

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #17 on: August 12, 2014, 09:03:17 PM »
Rehydration Formula

1 liter of potable water (2 liters for small children)
6-8 Tsp Sugar
1 Tsp Salt
1/2 Tsp Salt Substitute
1/4 Baking Soda

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #18 on: August 17, 2014, 12:41:06 PM »
Bumping so people can find

Offline Cedar

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #19 on: August 17, 2014, 01:11:15 PM »
Rehydration Formula

1 liter of potable water (2 liters for small children)
6-8 Tsp Sugar
1 Tsp Salt
1/2 Tsp Salt Substitute
1/4 Baking Soda


We also put in a but of lemon juice so people drink it more. We don't flavour it for the animals however.

Cedar

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2014, 01:48:14 PM »
I like to use a sprayer like this and use a bleach/water solution for spraying down the inside of my barns when pinkeye and ringworm flare up.  I suppose it could be used during a pandemic too.  It certainly helps control the spreading of my occasional issues.

Offline Oil Lady

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #21 on: August 17, 2014, 01:55:34 PM »
I am a home health aide. I take care of elderly and/or sick people in their homes.

I have not had to do home-care for people who were in any way contagious, but I have done nursing home work for contagious people (people with MRSA or C-DIF or VRE or Hep-3).

You first need to learn to follow all the protocols of what's called "standard precautions." Standard precautions were developed AFTER the whole AIDS thing became firmly entrenched in the national consciousness, and right as the world of healthcare was scrambling to try and protect their employees from harm, as well as prevent lawsuits from either a) AIDS-infected patients who suffered medical neglect as a result of employees refusing to care for them, or from b)  employees who got infected due to someone somewhere being careless. This is a set of protocols you follow when you honestly don't know if someone has anything contagious or not. But you err on the side of caution by assuming that MAYBE they do.

And then there's "enhanced standard precautions" aka "contact contact precautions" (or just "enhanced precautions"). These are the extra-vigilant procedures for how to care for people who have been positively identified as having a contagious disease. 



Here are some links to point you in the right direction.

STANDARD PRECAUTIONS
http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Standard+Precautions
http://www.cdc.gov/HAI/settings/outpatient/outpatient-care-gl-standared-precautions.html
https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/hospital/hazards/univprec/univ.html

ENHANCED PRECAUTIONS
http://www.rezahygiene.com/1/Hygiene-Resource/Infection-Control/Useful-Articles/View/smid/743/ArticleID/77/reftab/250/t/CDC---Guideline-for-Isolation-Precautions-in-Hospitals.aspx
http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/root/vumc.php?site=infectioncontrol&doc=22082
https://www.google.com/search?q=enhanced+contact+precautions&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=np&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=1wfxU-25Lc2hyATwxILACg&sqi=2&ved=0CEwQsAQ&biw=961&bih=506



And you can buy a lot of the needed equipment and supplies (especially the disposable supplies) at Home Depot, CostCo, Sam's Club, Walmart, etc. And anything you can't find there, that's when you either go to the internet, or else bite the bullet and cough up the cash for your local medical supply store.


One thing you really need to keep in mind: Do NOT try to reuse stuff! The name of the game is "infection control." Throw that shit away! The words "single use" mean exactly that. Use it once and then just THROW IT AWAY! I was stunned when I first started to work in medicine and saw the unmitigated waste that all medical facilities participate in. They throw away EVERYTHING! Even pillows --just throw them away! So stock the heck up on whatever you can, because once it's gone, it's gone. Don't for the luv of GAWD go digging through the trash to try and find something to re-use. Medical waste is shocking in its volume, but it's how we keep people from dying.

Offline Jack Crabb

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #22 on: August 18, 2014, 10:12:44 AM »
Rehydration Formula

1 liter of potable water (2 liters for small children)
6-8 Tsp Sugar
1 Tsp Salt
1/2 Tsp Salt Substitute
1/4 Baking Soda

Is the 2 liters for children so that the end product is a solution of half concentration as compared to the 1 liter solution, or is there something else going on there?

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Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #24 on: August 30, 2014, 04:55:23 PM »
Ok, so I added a few things we were lacking, good for any sicknesses, still havent got the extra trash bags and plastic sheeting, but it is on the list. I think also an extra bucket or two would be good, and we are almost out of honey, the wonder sweetner. I mostly do with out trash service, plastics, premade foods. SO, this was a good reminder of one reason to at least have some of this stuff around. Last addition was a bulk 1 lb bag of Frontier herbs veggie broth powder, because I dont usually have this canned and sometimes there's some in the freezer, and sometimes not. I will put it in a quart canning jar and vacume seal it. Also a couple dollar store saltine cracker packages. I have homecanned applesauce, apple juice and various teas. I even bought a small bottle of bleach, which is never, ever used here in normal circumstances. Copied the electrolyte solution recipes, put by medicine cabinet. checked that I have at least some masks and gloves.


Offline bcksknr

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #25 on: September 02, 2014, 08:54:13 PM »
     I made up some packets of the rehydration mixture and spread them throughout our FAKs. Sometimes I find that I lose lots of water while working around the place. I'm going to try adding this mix to the large amounts of iced tea that I usually drink while working. I've had some "interesting" problems as a result of dehydration in the past. It can really creep up on you if you don't watch your fluid intake and outflow. Thanks for posting the recipe.

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #26 on: September 02, 2014, 10:30:21 PM »
It can really creep up on you if you don't watch your fluid intake and outflow.

Boy howdy.  I think some may measure their fluid loss by how much they sweat and not realize how much actually is absorbed (evaporated) by your system before it reaches your skin in the form of sweat.  An ah-ha moment I had many years ago, while drinking a lot of fluid and working hard, was when I realized I wasn't urinating (all day) and I had drank over a gallon of fluid over just a few hours.  I had been sweating, but certainly not as much as I was taking in.

Offline doublehelix

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #27 on: September 14, 2014, 03:05:29 PM »
If you are planning a cot setup for a pandemic sick room, Google "Cholera cot" for some interesting ideas that allow for easier disinfection.

Plastic sheeting is your friend.
 ;)


Offline spud

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #28 on: September 21, 2014, 12:43:04 PM »
I wonder how well black soldier flies would work, especially if there is an inability to bury d/t large amount of work. Buring large animals by hand my be impossible w/o equipment.  Lack of topsoil might be a problem in some areas also.  There is a story of Muslims putting Christians in the first or second century that were slain in wells and then dying afterwards from contaminated water.


Offline Frugal Upstate

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Re: Pandemic supplies
« Reply #29 on: September 22, 2014, 06:51:49 AM »
Since everyone else is covering the medical and sick room aspects quite well, I thought I'd give a bit of a different take:

In the event of quarantine (especially if you self quarantine before it becomes mandatory) one of my concerns was how to continue educating (and keep occupied) my currently public schooled children (they are both in middle school).  So I have a "pandemic education plan". 

I didn't want to spend a ton on a "maybe" situation, and I didn't want anything that was reliant on the internet, although in my own personal assessment I felt comfortable assuming at least periodic use of my computer for printing etc due to having a couple of redundancies in place for power.

I purchased the A2 Homeschool Curriculum which covers K-12.  It's about $100 and is all on one CD.  A "self teaching" method based on reading (with worksheets and spelling/vocabulary) the CD includes lots of old texts, most of which are available for free out there but which it's handy to have all in once place.  It does basic math, but not advanced, for that they recommend Saxon.

I have several full sets of extra ink for the printer and picked up a 5 ream box of paper.  I also have two old e-readers (plain black and white, no fancy internet, one Nook and one Kindle) which I could download the books to if I didn't want to print out.

Additionally I asked around and was given for free a two sets of encyclopedias (1971 World Book and 1971 Collegiate Encyclopedia).  I've also been picking up cheap at thrift stores and from friends "classic" books like Frankenstien, Tom Sawyer etc.

Of course the same plan is usable for any situation where I either feel it necessary to pull the kids out of school or where the school is shut down for a period of time (or forever).  The only one it doesn't work for is an EMP that actually fries the computer, but in that case I've probably got enough yard sale text books and classic books to make a go at it.