Author Topic: Home repairs with a 3D printer  (Read 16208 times)

Offline scoob

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Re: Home repairs with a 3D printer
« Reply #30 on: February 05, 2013, 06:35:41 PM »
Total size would be the size of my Kindle Fire,.. or a 7" tablet.  Thickness relevant to the batteries.  Recessed USB jack which is the charger .  Batteries would be in pairs supplying 3v, but would have multiple 'packs' to increase the run time. and off hand I can't remember how many that is,..

I might split one 'pack' off to use with a charger - so you would have a place for a solar charger, panel on the back of it also.  So you can cycle batteries around and always have power.

Awesome idea!  Let's see if my vision even remotely resembles your vision:   ;D





I haven't started on designing electronics yet, but some thoughts:   USB is 5 volts, but I don't know what the voltage requirements are for the Kindle Fire, whether just operating, or actually charging.  Is 4.8v (4 batteries) enough?  The "sled" above has voids to run wiring and some slim circuitry, and I could design some clips to snap a solar unit of similar footprint.

I better get some filament ordered... this one is gonna suck up some plastic!   :o

+1 for this post. There is a longstanding disagreement in our house about 3d printing, and now I have evidence for my position! Neither my husband nor I have any background in computer design etc. and I just recently learned 3d printers even existed for home use. I am soooo interested in where this technology is going, and I told my husband that some day we'll be able to just print off those little widgets that break and render household items useless instead of having to order them or drive 50 miles to town for a replacement. He said no way, that'll never happen. I am going to win this one after he sees your post!  ;D

The guy I got parts to build my machine from showed me a shelf clip in his refrigerator that he printed.  It would have cost him over $100 to buy the whole shelf just to get the little 'clippy-thingy'.  He was also working on a piece to fix the power windows in his car at the time.  He has it posted on Thingiverse.  You should check out the "Replacement Parts" section.

Offline idelphic

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Re: Home repairs with a 3D printer
« Reply #31 on: February 05, 2013, 08:21:08 PM »
Awesome idea!  Let's see if my vision even remotely resembles your vision:   ;D

Image Link to save space

Image Link to save space

I haven't started on designing electronics yet, but some thoughts:   USB is 5 volts, but I don't know what the voltage requirements are for the Kindle Fire, whether just operating, or actually charging.  Is 4.8v (4 batteries) enough?  The "sled" above has voids to run wiring and some slim circuitry, and I could design some clips to snap a solar unit of similar footprint.

I better get some filament ordered... this one is gonna suck up some plastic!   :o

The guy I got parts to build my machine from showed me a shelf clip in his refrigerator that he printed.  It would have cost him over $100 to buy the whole shelf just to get the little 'clippy-thingy'.  He was also working on a piece to fix the power windows in his car at the time.  He has it posted on Thingiverse.  You should check out the "Replacement Parts" section.

Pretty much - that is about what I am thinking.  I had thought of pairing the batteries in a 'U' formation like you see in many toys and in your TV Remote.  But that may not be what I need.  I need to think about that for a few.  By using the 'U' layout, you can have single '+' and '-' bus to connect to.

One pair of batteries would be 'out of primary' to use as a solar charger.  I pondered that earlier today, and honestly you could have 4 batteries in that configuration. I have a 6 LED flashlight that has 4 AA batteries in it, and a single solar panel of about 2" by 4"... didn't take much to charge them up to power the light on...  Again.. some thought on this might be in order.

As for the voltage, the Minty Booster (Referenced in my last message) is a Up converter.  It takes 3v (AA batteries are 1.2 or 1.5v) and boosts it to 5v needed to power / charge 99% of all USB powered devices.  And the way this circuit is done is that it will strip all the voltage out of the batteries,.. so mostly dead AA batteries will still charge a iPhone or Blackberry or,.. etc -

The Minty Boost Circuit is purposed to use only 2 AA batteries.  But adding the others you get more capacity so you get a full charge out of one plug up.  It's small, and easy to use.  I've already got a unit on order,... just want a nice clean package to put it all in...  I can hot glue a few parts together from Radio Shack,..  but why?

btw - Here is a Instruct-able on the Double Minty

Offline SlimJim

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Re: Home repairs with a 3D printer
« Reply #32 on: February 06, 2013, 08:00:37 PM »
I have a MakerBot Replicator (1) in my classroom (don't you wish I was your kid's teacher!?) I also teach SolidWorks, so it's a natural extension. We just completed a "SolidWorks Derby" kind of like a pinewood derby in Scouts, but with a 3D printer. Talk about fun!

Anyway, should you buy a pre-built one or build from a kit? It depends! Which hobby do you want: Making things? or tinkering with a printer? Now these are both really cool hobbies, but if you want to print with over 50% success, you need a pre-built machine. Heck, even with a really nice printer, there is a very real learning curve with this.

BTW, As soon as my five-year old saw the 3D printer, she said "you could make bird parts for mr. potato head"  Yep, she's growing up in the future!

SlimJim
« Last Edit: February 07, 2013, 05:56:54 AM by Nicodemus »

Offline creuzerm

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Re: Home repairs with a 3D printer
« Reply #33 on: April 01, 2013, 09:20:48 AM »
I've had a RepRap (The name for the self reproducing 3D printers) for about a year, and am building my 2nd one.

These things are a total game changer for fixing and making things around the house & yard. It takes time to re-learn the entire problem solving process when you incorporate one of these into your 'tool box'. But once that mind-blowing trip is done, it's as simple as saying... "I'll just print one"

NOTE: Thingiverse is a website hosted by one of the companies that sells 3d printers where people can upload their designs to share. It's a great resource.

Some of the things I've fixed:

I print a lot of tools with my printer:
  • corner brackets for using a ratchet strap for a box clamp http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:45754
  • several dremel tool attachments such as router heads
  • various tool holders such as screwdriver racks

I make parts with my printer for projects:

And they can be used for fun stuff too:
  • Mickey Mouse Cookie Cutters for my daughter's birthday
  • various small toys for the kids

Oh, and the printer can be used to make more printers and upgrades for itself.

Various other things I've printed can be found on my blog at http://mike.creuzer.com/topic/builds/3d-objects

One of the things I want to do is build a waste oil burner that can be used both as a forge for my blacksmithing, but also as a burner for a metal casting furnace. Than I can print plastic parts, sand cast them, and make metal parts!

I have a 2 year old that is growing up with these contraptions. A big 'ah ha' moment for her was one night when I was tweaking a model's dimensions, and she saw it on the computer screen and she named the shape and I said "Lets go get it" and brought her downstairs to the printer and handed her the previous, slightly off part off the printer bed.  Now she LOVES looking at my screen and saying 'Lets go get it" when I have a printable model on the screen.



Offline Trimbleman

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Re: Home repairs with a 3D printer
« Reply #34 on: April 08, 2013, 08:31:50 PM »
I just came across rep rap over the weekend and I can not tell you how excited I am that there are other preppers into this.  Any suggestions on how to find the closest printer to my location to help print my printer?

Kevin

Offline scoob

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Re: Home repairs with a 3D printer
« Reply #35 on: April 09, 2013, 06:46:46 AM »
I just came across rep rap over the weekend and I can not tell you how excited I am that there are other preppers into this.  Any suggestions on how to find the closest printer to my location to help print my printer?
Kevin

Kevin - Start <HERE> and see if there's a local RUG, hackerspace, makerspace, or open lab.  Don't be thrown-off by the term hackerspace.  My experience is that one finds a good mix of life hackers and computer hackers.  An example of a life hacker would be a guy that modifies a thermostatic attic vent/fan to cool his greenhouse.  Our local group just had a workshop that was supposed to be about automating homebrewing, that turned in to homebrewing 101.  I digress...  Anyway, fiddle around in the reprap forums.  If you can't find a local group, there are folks on there that will print parts and sell them to you.  Buyer beware, as always.  There are established companies that will sell you the printed parts as well.  Companies will charge a bit more.  If you buy from an individual, you're probably just helping him recoup the costs of building his machine.

Offline scoob

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Re: Home repairs with a 3D printer
« Reply #36 on: April 09, 2013, 06:49:13 AM »
Mike - Great post, and great blog... Thanks!

Offline Trimbleman

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Re: Home repairs with a 3D printer
« Reply #37 on: April 09, 2013, 09:10:54 PM »
I am trying the rep rap forums for my area nj..... But it seems to take forever for me to login on the server.

Kevin

Offline creuzerm

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Re: Home repairs with a 3D printer
« Reply #38 on: April 10, 2013, 10:10:56 AM »
I am trying the rep rap forums for my area nj..... But it seems to take forever for me to login on the server.


The RepRap sites have been down/stupid slow for the last week or so. I was able to pull it up this morning. Try again when you get a chance.

Offline Trimbleman

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Re: Home repairs with a 3D printer
« Reply #39 on: April 10, 2013, 08:28:41 PM »
Ok thanks for confirming that.
I thought maybe it was me!

Kevin

Offline Zeus

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Re: Home repairs with a 3D printer
« Reply #40 on: October 28, 2014, 07:28:16 AM »
This thread just gave me an idea for a new lucrative side job, 3D printer repair.

Offline strangetanks

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Re: Home repairs with a 3D printer
« Reply #41 on: October 29, 2014, 06:58:29 AM »
It actually surprises me that this tech is just getting into the main stream.  I worked for a small prototyping company and we were doing rapid prototyping 18 years ago.  The machines were crazy expensive at the time, but we would just email files to a contractor and get parts fed ex'ed to us the next day.  Plus we had cnc milling machines and 3d scanners for in house production.

The thing I don't like about the 3d printers, I don't feel like the resolution is very good and second the material seems to be horribly expensive to me.

I built a 4'x8' cnc router a few years ago, whip out wood, plastic and aluminum parts all the time.  Nice to be able to throw a sheet of plywood on the machine and come back in an hour or 2 and pick up a pile of parts.