Author Topic: Food Plots  (Read 2992 times)

Max

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Food Plots
« on: October 01, 2014, 09:28:22 AM »
How many of you have created food plots for Whitetail hunting? I did a couple of shows on hunting and food plots. I advised people, if they can, to make their plots large because it can bring in deer from outside of your land. Well check out these pictures that I posted on my blog. This is the big guy’s first appearance and we are positive that it is his first appearance because we have seven game cameras set up down there since the beginning of August. They were taken last week. The rut is going to be interesting this year.

http://modernamericanprepper.com/update-on-the-food-plot-2/

Offline LibertyBelle

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Re: Food Plots
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2014, 12:30:54 PM »
Not really planted specifically for deer, but each year we plant anywhere from 1/3 to an acre of organic heirloom turnips.  We really like turnips, but since the deer like them just as much, we have to plant a lot if we're going to get any for ourselves. 

Speaking of rut, DH and I went out to check the little pond in the woods this weekend and Wow, could we smell buck! It was almost as strong as the buck goat we had last year when he was in full rut, but he has since passed and the new replacement is still a baby, and there are no other male goats around.  This is unusual as the deer here usually go into their first rut around the second week of November (2nd rut towards the end of December).     


Max

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Re: Food Plots
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2014, 01:17:46 PM »
Not really planted specifically for deer, but each year we plant anywhere from 1/3 to an acre of organic heirloom turnips.  We really like turnips, but since the deer like them just as much, we have to plant a lot if we're going to get any for ourselves. 

Speaking of rut, DH and I went out to check the little pond in the woods this weekend and Wow, could we smell buck! It was almost as strong as the buck goat we had last year when he was in full rut, but he has since passed and the new replacement is still a baby, and there are no other male goats around.  This is unusual as the deer here usually go into their first rut around the second week of November (2nd rut towards the end of December).     

Funny you should mention that and yes you are correct the first rut is typically around the second week of November. However this past Saturday when I was in my stand I could hear a dominate buck grunt in a new plot we built this year which is 100 yards to my right. Now I could not see anything in that plot because the woods is pretty thick between the two plots. I had two doe that I could've shot but I was waiting for that buck to come over, which he never did but man he carried on for a good 45 mins.

Offline racer038

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Re: Food Plots
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2014, 08:00:56 PM »
I have been planting food plots every other year since 2008.  I have a 12 acre field that was worn out by the previous owner. I discussed with the local extension agent after getting soil samples and have been using the following recipe for worn out ground: 50 lb of buck oats, 50 lbs of Austrian Winter Peas, 5 lbs of white ladina clover, two pounds each of turnips and radishes.  This 109 lb. of seed is broadcast over 1 acre.  Each year I pick a different section of the field to prepare by using a bottom plow to turn, disk and disk and disk again.  I drag it with a large cedar post, broadcast the peas, then drag with a chain link fence.  Then overseed the remaining seed and a cultipacker.  I do this to set the peas deeper than the oats, clover, turnips and radishes.

If I am seeding a section that has previously been used as a plot, I try to disk it first.  If it won't work up, I use the tiller, then disk, drag, seed and cultipack.  I have seen no advantage to using the bottom plow on subsequent plots......yet.  I also will substitute wheat for oats and crimson for white ladina on repeat plots.

This recipe has brought the field back to life without the need for bulk fertilizers.  I am in zone 6, Kentucky, and have battled some periodic drought conditions.  The soil health is the primary concern, providing forage for deer is secondary.  My only observation is that any plot I have prepared of less than one acre has been decimated prior to the gun season.  Not enough to support the deer.  I prepared a 1/4 acre field this summer in the woods, near a salt lick and the deer and turkey keep it nearly bare.  The ground looks like someone has taken a tiller to it!  However the acre plots in the field are doing better.  The edges are bare, but the middle is doing ok.