Author Topic: Noob  (Read 8603 times)

kaiservontexas

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Noob
« on: October 19, 2008, 12:01:49 PM »
I will have to admit I have never been hunting. Grandpa died before our trip when I was young.  :'(

Beyond firearms and knives because I own both appropriate for a trip. What other gear is required?

Offline DeltaEchoVictor

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Re: Noob
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2008, 08:53:54 PM »
Well, not much, or a lot.  It's kind of up to you & what you're planning on hunting.  If you're planning on extended stays you'll need general camping gear, however much & whatever type you think you'll need to be comfortable.

I have a 600 acre lease that I deer hunt on every year.  I have electric on the lease & an outhouse but no live water.  I bought a small camper to use while I'm deer hunting because I'll often spend a few days out in the woods.  Sleeping on the ground sucks, hence the camper. It's a comfy little place for extended stays but I started out in a tent with a sleeping bag & that's about all.

Here's a short list of what I take to deer camp besides the camper.

This stuff stays in the camper & ready to go.
2 Coleman lanterns with extra fuel.
1 dual burner Coleman stove (just in case)
2 Propane tanks. (for the stove/oven in the camper)
2 flashlights.
2 sleeping bags, pillows with sheets for the bunks.
Extra blankets
Paper plates/cups
Paper towels
Hand sanitizer
Cast iron skillets
Dish Soap
Paper towels
Cloth dish towels
Large towels (on the off chance I dive into a freezing pond)
Coffee percolator (old fashioned kind)
Coffee
Playing cards, checkers & backgammon (in case I have guests)
Knives & forks (not plastic)
2 5 gallon water containers
Camp chairs
Radio

Stuff I load into the Jeep whenever I go for an extended stay
Longbow & arrows
Hunting knife & kukri
Hunting clothes
Spare regular clothes (includes socks, undies, etc.)
Hunting shoes
Slip on shoes (Crocs, flip flops, etc.)
Cooler or two, depending on how long I'm staying
Food (fill water jugs)
Rain gear (I need some new rain gear)
I'm probably forgetting something here, but you get the general idea.

What I take for a day hunt
Longbow & arrows
Hunting knife
Game bag if small game hunting
Ziploc bags
Camel back or bottled water
Hand sanitizer
Roll of paper towels

Choice of gear is a highly individual thing.  As you can see spending a few days in deer camp can get gear heavy.  Just going for the day I like to travel light.  The only things I ever actually carry on me are the bow, arrows & knife & since I day hunt & extended stay hunt on the same 600 acres, if there's something I need I can usually get it out of my camper.

If I were you & just starting out I'd start with a short trip.  Maybe a few hours to see if you even like hunting.  Do you know anyone you could go with initially?

If you do decide to go, map out a plan and let someone know where you are going and when you will be back.  Give them a general idea of where you will be in the woods and stick to your schedule, go home when you told them you'd be home.  The worst thing that can happen is for you to get injured or lost and no one have any idea where you are or when to expect you back.

Do you know how to use a compass?  If not, you should learn.  Even if you have GPS, batteries go dead & tree canopy can block signal.  It's easy to get turned around, anyone who's spent anytime in the woods has gotten lost, including myself.

If you have more specific questions, ask away!  I'm sure there are more people on this board than just me who have spent a lot of time in the woods.  I'll be glad to help if I can. ;)


 
« Last Edit: October 19, 2008, 09:02:21 PM by DeltaEchoVictor »

Offline Beetle

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Re: Noob
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2008, 09:16:23 PM »
Wow I think it would be easier to list whats not taken. Our big trips are elk hunting, which last three weeks in the middle of a National forest and we get ridiculous on what we bring. I have even seen some camps with home made hot tubs(seems kinda freaky when typing it), but after a day of humpin' the hills all day it actually sounds like a good idea. What kind of hunting are you planning? How long? and whats is your area and climate like? Because your gonna have a ton of variables?

Offline ColdHaven

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Re: Noob
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2008, 10:44:22 PM »
I am a newbie to hunting as well. Several people here have been kind enough to give me pointers and advice. Some have directed me to this wonderful resource called the internet where I can pull up video on the topic.  :D However, most of my training will have to center around cleaning, gutting, and what kind of ammo to use, appropriate seasons for hunting various animals, ect. I spent most of my youth playing around in the woods. Compass is a must and a map. I would recommend at least those, and gear to keep you warm, shelter, and tools to make fire...oh and some food, and a head lamp. You know what? Bring enough stuff to camp with if you are planning over night, but at least those things I mentioned for the day. You never know what can happen.

kaiservontexas

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Re: Noob
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2008, 03:43:37 PM »
No real plans yet. I am thinking of taking squirrels on the family property as this would teach me a few basic quick from my understand. I need to check out the land though it has been a while and we got a guy running cattle out there, gets us the agro tax break on property taxes. Right now I am bogged down with my last year of university and a job.

I am also curious about processing. I want to acquire the skill as my Grandpa knew it. He never took meat to somebody else for processing. I see this as a useful preparedness skill to know. So you can say I want to learn as much as possible on all fronts.

FYI: I live in Texas so I am thinking small game, deer, and hogs. 

Thanks for everything thus far!

Oh and no I do not know anybody. :(

Offline wcff3431

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Re: Noob
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2008, 03:41:04 PM »
whats the limits on them where you are at i took bread bags with me squrriel hunting (keeps the blood from running down your back).

leatherneck

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Re: Noob
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2008, 08:20:18 PM »
I do a fair amount of squirrel hunting each year. I typically have a 22 rifle , small knife (3inch blade or less) game vest, binos, water, hand towel, a bar of soap and bags to carry the cleaned game in. Other than that all you need is a pair of comfortable and quiet boots. The main thing with squirrel is to move slowly, quietly and to watch for the slightest movement. Squirrel in the woods are a lot more Leary than those in town.

Offline Lawyerman

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Re: Noob
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2008, 06:29:43 AM »
If you can bag a limit of squirrels you are ready to hunt deer. Not alot of equipment needed for squirrel hunting. I usually carry a rifle and extra ammo and a Camelback with some snacks and extra water/drinks. You will need a knife of some kind as well obviously.

On "dressing" squirrels there are a couple of different ways to do it. I will say that no matter what way you go it's quicker and easier when they are still warm- just after the kill and in the field. The way I do it is to make a small incision in the middle of the back at a right angle to the backbone. Then I insert my index and pointer fingers of each hand into the incision and pull in opposite directions. This will remove the hide quite easily. I cut the head off and of course the legs at the feet. Then you open up the body cavity and pull out all of the entrails. Done. Squirrels are easy.

Good luck.

kaiservontexas

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Re: Noob
« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2008, 10:27:30 AM »
whats the limits on them where you are at i took bread bags with me squrriel hunting (keeps the blood from running down your back).

The county has no bag limit for squirrels.

nate49080

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Re: Noob
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2008, 08:11:58 AM »
i really need to go small game hunting i havent done it in 10 years i think. i really want to take my son when he gets a little older so he can hopefully enjoy it while you still can hunt.

Offline cajunkraut

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Re: Noob
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2008, 10:38:52 PM »
I will have to admit I have never been hunting. Grandpa died before our trip when I was young.  :'(

Beyond firearms and knives because I own both appropriate for a trip. What other gear is required?

I'm a hunting n00b too :D

In fact I went on my first deer hunt today. My in-laws' house is on 40 acres of field and woods in southern Mississippi and they keep food plots going throughout the year. I got up at 5 am this morning and went out into their woods to wait in a blind with my dad's old Model 94 30-30 and a .357 in case of bobcats. Unfortunately it was too warm (mid 60's) for the deer to be moving a lot and so I didn't see anything. Gave up after 3 hours.

I didn't get to shoot a bobcat either.

Offline flagtag

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Re: Noob
« Reply #11 on: December 21, 2008, 12:14:30 PM »
Lucky, lucky person!  Last temp check here was 8 degrees. 

Offline Linker

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Re: Noob
« Reply #12 on: December 21, 2008, 05:48:35 PM »
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_j-anybd20&feature=channel_page
this guy has a few videos of securing meat sources and butchering- this video is about the biggest squirrel i've ever seen and the eating of  it

zumatx

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Re: Noob
« Reply #13 on: January 08, 2009, 06:23:24 PM »
I'm interested in getting into hunting too. Grew up in the woods, but my dad wasn't a hunter, so I didn't grow up as one either. I'm pretty sure (not 100%, though) that you are required to take a hunter education class if you want to go out hunting by yourself here in Texas. Its been a while since I looked that info up. I figure that if I'm going to eat meat, I should be able to get it myself.

Offline Spamity Calamity

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Re: Noob
« Reply #14 on: January 08, 2009, 06:56:49 PM »
Dont feel bad Ive never been hunting either and its low on my priority list honestly.

Offline flagtag

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Re: Noob
« Reply #15 on: January 08, 2009, 07:31:31 PM »
I'm interested in getting into hunting too. Grew up in the woods, but my dad wasn't a hunter, so I didn't grow up as one either. I'm pretty sure (not 100%, though) that you are required to take a hunter education class if you want to go out hunting by yourself here in Texas. Its been a while since I looked that info up. I figure that if I'm going to eat meat, I should be able to get it myself.

Course required if you were born after a certain date. (Sorry, can't remember what it is)

zumatx

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Re: Noob
« Reply #16 on: January 08, 2009, 07:51:45 PM »
I'm interested in getting into hunting too. Grew up in the woods, but my dad wasn't a hunter, so I didn't grow up as one either. I'm pretty sure (not 100%, though) that you are required to take a hunter education class if you want to go out hunting by yourself here in Texas. Its been a while since I looked that info up. I figure that if I'm going to eat meat, I should be able to get it myself.

Course required if you were born after a certain date. (Sorry, can't remember what it is)

I just looked it up again. You have to take the class if you were born after September 2, 1971.

Offline flagtag

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Re: Noob
« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2009, 08:17:06 PM »
But, it still wouldn't hurt to take the course anyway if one was born before that date.  I plan to. (I was born a *little* before that date.  ;D)

zumatx

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Re: Noob
« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2009, 08:59:10 PM »
It would be a good idea, but I'll be required to take it anyway.

Offline Roswell

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Re: Noob
« Reply #19 on: February 03, 2009, 11:14:44 PM »
I'm not a noob, but I am returning to hunting after over 10 year away. Haven't been since high school.  Any other tips from those that are old hats?  I am in GA by the way and I plan on hunting dove, deer and small game.

Offline nafterize

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Re: Noob
« Reply #20 on: February 16, 2009, 09:09:05 PM »
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_j-anybd20&feature=channel_page
this guy has a few videos of securing meat sources and butchering- this video is about the biggest squirrel i've ever seen and the eating of  it

I´m also a hunting noob. I have to say, I think that squirrel was juicing. It´s huge! I was surprised at how easy it is to clean one. That makes me want to go!

FreeFire

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Re: Noob
« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2009, 08:15:06 PM »
In addition to what the others have said, the two things I'd say are of utmost importance: thermal layers and binoculars.

The thermals are indispensable, that or other moisture wicking garments. I can't count how many times I've been out in the woods hunting and cold has started creeping in. When you get cold, you tend to fidget or shiver, which diminishes stealth and reduces opportunities.

With the binos, it will help you scan your area with a fine tooth comb. Even if you're in a relatively tight quarters, the binos will assist in the analysis of targets and help you spot game earlier.

 

Offline Roswell

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Re: Noob
« Reply #22 on: February 23, 2009, 09:29:29 PM »
good call.  I went squirrel hunting this weekend and it was freezing.  The top of my water bottle froze to the bottle and I live in Georgia!  I didn't have binoculars, but I sure wish I had.  Next time.   :-[

Offline Ultio1

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Re: Noob
« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2009, 12:09:54 PM »
A map and a compass are good ideas and not terribly expensive.

Offline Dan

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Re: Noob
« Reply #24 on: March 11, 2009, 02:10:03 PM »
Glad to see I’m not the only noob around here.

I had a friend come over a few days ago so we could go over the synopsis together and he was a big help in clarifying what tags I need to get to go deer hunting this year. I tried last year but didn’t realize how far in advance you have to put in for tags and by that time it was too late. I have seen animals large and small gutted and skinned but I too would like to learn how to process my own meat.

As for gear I plan to hunt the BLM land behind my brothers place and will probably only be out a few hours but will be taking along enough stuff to keep me alive for a day or two, like a streamlined 72 hour kit, just in case something happens and it turns into an unintentional overnighter.

Offline Roswell

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Re: Noob
« Reply #25 on: March 11, 2009, 02:15:34 PM »

As for gear I plan to hunt the BLM land behind my brothers place and will probably only be out a few hours but will be taking along enough stuff to keep me alive for a day or two, like a streamlined 72 hour kit, just in case something happens and it turns into an unintentional overnighter.

I carry a similar pack.  In way of a light emergency shelter, I carry a rain poncho that has grommets on it and a little paracord (50 ft).  Very light and dual purpose.  Not as permanent as a tent, but it could potentially last a long time if needed.  The paracord of course has more uses than I can count.