Author Topic: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?  (Read 7882 times)

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #30 on: July 25, 2017, 04:35:37 PM »
My youngest has been sailing a litte bit this summer with a young person that owns a sail boat here. She is learning some on sailing it, which is fun. I think there is some kind of wednesday night group sail. A few of them camped out over night on it on the 4th, which at this stage on it, is roughing it ! The young man who owns it used to live on it full time, quite a few people live full time on a boat docked at the harbor and pay a berth fee, he is staying mostly with his folks right now as he gutted the inside of the boat and is re-doing. Good hobby for a young person in college I think. Some are ripping apart their cars, some their motorcycles, and a few are gutting old sailboats I guess.
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Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #31 on: July 25, 2017, 05:02:28 PM »
27 ft is pretty small to live in full time. I would recommend 30' to 40' sailboat. Something that has a decent sized shower. Larger than 40' and you would need a crew.

From people I've talked to and what I've read, that's accurate.  It really is a bit of a pickle. 

Assuming cost is not a factor, the bigger boats are more stable and all around more appropriate for year round weather.
While there's more storage space for provisions and gear, you do need a crew at a point, which immediately offsets the additional space afforded.
Also, a longer hull can often most more to dock in marinas.

Aside from being uncomfortable (I'm 6'4"), the 27' boats are usually designed for fair weather weekend sailing, and have open air cockpits, or even tillers in some cases. 

In my thinking, get the biggest boat that you (and your sig other) can crew yourself.  Though when I was pondering some of this out loud, my wife asked a sensible question "what if one of is is injured or sick?  Do we die at sea because we have a crew of one?".  I am not experienced enough to answer that at this time...

Offline Carl

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #32 on: July 25, 2017, 05:20:18 PM »
  For me a boat is at the top of the list of things that take far more money and maintenance than they are worth.

fancy Boat
fancy sports car
Fancy mistress
fancy wife
3 pull out ,pusher camper
personal airplane
Fancy Ham radio and tower
fancy house
horse
Stop complaining about life and start Celebrating it .

I've reached the age where there is little left to learn the hard way.

If you had only one year,one month,or one day...Would you live your life differently?

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #33 on: July 25, 2017, 05:28:45 PM »
  For me a boat is at the top of the list of things that take far more money and maintenance than they are worth.

fancy Boat
fancy sports car
Fancy mistress
fancy wife
3 pull out ,pusher camper
personal airplane
Fancy Ham radio and tower
fancy house
horse

As I've mentioned, unless I have a massive unexpected windfall, I've no plans to own a boat.  But I do want to gain some sailing skills in case some other sucker with a 50 footer needs a crew member.
AKA: the only thing better than owning a boat, is a close friend who owns a boat ;)

Offline Carl

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #34 on: July 25, 2017, 05:35:01 PM »
  Yes, a borrowed boat can be fun.I have lived on a houseboat ,on a river,but a sailboat is a whole other breed. Sailing can be a good skill to have...like flying as you never know when you will have to stand tall.
Stop complaining about life and start Celebrating it .

I've reached the age where there is little left to learn the hard way.

If you had only one year,one month,or one day...Would you live your life differently?

Offline Black November

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #35 on: July 26, 2017, 08:26:07 AM »
As I've mentioned, unless I have a massive unexpected windfall, I've no plans to own a boat.  But I do want to gain some sailing skills in case some other sucker with a 50 footer needs a crew member.
AKA: the only thing better than owning a boat, is a close friend who owns a boat ;)

Agreed. I have no plans to buy a boat. They cost more than their worth. However, if sailing is your thing, and that is all you dreamed about doing your whole life, being able to use it as a bug out vehicle is an additional benefit. 

[I did crew on a few boats when I was a younger]
« Last Edit: July 26, 2017, 08:38:23 AM by Black November »

Offline surfivor

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #36 on: July 26, 2017, 09:14:45 AM »
Agreed. I have no plans to buy a boat. They cost more than their worth. However, if sailing is your thing, and that is all you dreamed about doing your whole life, being able to use it as a bug out vehicle is an additional benefit. 

[I did crew on a few boats when I was a younger]

 I think I would have a fear of getting too far offshore, major storms, and pirates in various exotic places. You could also find yourself far from medical help where some helicopter would have to rescue you but in some parts of the world, no helicopter will be coming .. You are going to die someday anyway but still something to think about

 It might be nice though to arrive at some uninhabited island and stay there or other inaccessible places



https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/mar/01/mummified-body-of-german-man-found-in-yacht-adrift-off-philippines

Mummified body of German man found in yacht adrift off Philippines

..

Bajorat had reportedly been sailing the world on his yacht, Sayo, for the past 20 years.

Reports said he had not been sighted since 2009. But a friend told the media that he had heard from the mariner in 2015 via Facebook.

..

Bajorat’s body was found seated at a desk in the radio room, slumped over on his right arm “like he was sleeping”, said Navales.

..

Dr Mark Benecke, a forensic criminologist in the German city of Cologne, told the Bild newspaper: “The way he is sitting seems to indicate that death was unexpected, perhaps from a heart attack.”



=======

http://www.ybw.com/news-from-yachting-boating-world/german-sailor-found-dead-on-drifting-yacht-off-grenada-51607

Police in Grenada have confirmed that the decomposing body of a German sailor has been found on a yacht drifting seven miles south of the Caribbean island.

Officers said that a group of Grenadian divers spotted the 40-foot vessel, called Vamp, and reported it to the Grenada Coast Guard on 13 April 2017.

Coast Guard officials boarded the vessel, which had badly damaged sails, and found the decomposing body on board.



=======

http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2016/04/04/study-finds-more-deaths-in-us-from-sailing-than-football/

Providence, RI (April 4, 2016) – A new study from Rhode Island Hospital researchers based on data from the U.S. Coast Guard found that sailing in the U.S. has a higher fatality rate than football and downhill skiing.

Despite an image of carefree jaunts in sun-splashed waters, sailors experience fatalities at a higher rate than that of sports known for lightning speeds, falls and collisions. In fact, falls overboard, high winds, and operator inattention are known factors lifting American sailing death rates, with alcohol implicated in 15 percent of all sailing deaths.

..

By law, all boating deaths, disappearances, significant injuries and major vessel damage must be reported to authorities. The Coast Guard maintains a database of the reports, and the researchers analyzed the 4,180 reports detailing 271 fatalities and 841 injuries. They estimated the fatality rate at 1.19 deaths per million sailing person-days.

Comparatively, the fatality rates for alpine skiing and snowboarding are 1.06 per million skier/snowboarder person-days. During the 11-year study period, 271 deaths were related to sailing versus the 197 incidents of American football players who died during play or practice.

« Last Edit: July 26, 2017, 09:40:52 AM by surfivor »

Offline Carl

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #37 on: July 26, 2017, 09:44:36 AM »
By law, all boating deaths, disappearances, significant injuries and major vessel damage must be reported to authorities.


So....you not only die at sea but can also go to jail?
Stop complaining about life and start Celebrating it .

I've reached the age where there is little left to learn the hard way.

If you had only one year,one month,or one day...Would you live your life differently?

Offline surfivor

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #38 on: July 26, 2017, 09:55:05 AM »
By law, all boating deaths, disappearances, significant injuries and major vessel damage must be reported to authorities.


So....you not only die at sea but can also go to jail?

 If you are in the middle of the ocean someplace, in the middle of the gulf of Mexico or off the coast of Cuba ..  how do you know which authorities or how do you contact them ?

 They find you dead and decide you broke the law, so they keep the boat or fine your relatives ?

Offline Carl

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #39 on: July 26, 2017, 10:01:30 AM »
If you are in the middle of the ocean someplace, in the middle of the gulf of Mexico or off the coast of Cuba ..  how do you know which authorities or how do you contact them ?

 They find you dead and decide you broke the law, so they keep the boat or fine your relatives ?

It depends on which way you are headed....
Stop complaining about life and start Celebrating it .

I've reached the age where there is little left to learn the hard way.

If you had only one year,one month,or one day...Would you live your life differently?

Offline surfivor

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #40 on: July 26, 2017, 10:09:37 AM »
https://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/industries/2003-03-11-fishing-safety_x.htm

Despite law, fishermen face deadliest job risks

==========

http://people.com/archive/a-students-death-at-sea-inspires-his-parents-crusade-for-fishing-boat-safety-laws-vol-25-no-15/

A Student's Death at Sea Inspires His Parents' Crusade for Fishing Boat Safety Laws

..


What horrifed the Barrys most of all was the fact that the deaths of their son, and of skipper Gerald Bouchard, 58, and hands Christopher Hofer, 27, Stuart Darling, 25, Chris McLain, 24, and Bill Posey, 24, were nothing out of the ordinary. In fact, fatal sinkings are routine occurrences in the perilous seas off Alaska and the Pacific Northwest. Since 1981 an average of 72 commercial boats have sunk there each year, and the sea has swallowed up a total of 108 fishermen. Nationwide the numbers are even higher, with 250 fishing boats sinking—and an average of 86 lives lost—each year. These grim statistics make commercial fishing the nation’s most dangerous business, with a death rate seven times higher than the national average for occupations and two times higher than mining, the next most hazardous job.


Those facts moved Robert Barry to act. On the day after the memorial service for Peter, he sat down and wrote an article highlighting the dangerous lack of safety regulations in the fishing industry. Published by several small newspapers in coastal towns, the article was later distributed by the Associated Press. Barry hoped that it would serve as a warning to the estimated 20,000 people—many of them college students—who flock to Alaska each summer to find adventure and big paychecks in the fishing industry. “My first aim is to bring the dangers of the problem to everybody’s mind,” Barry says, “especially the kids who go up there to fish.”


But Barry did not stop there. He and his wife have been lobbying Congress for legislation mandating minimum safety standards in the fishing industry. “There should be compulsory legislation for emergency beacons, survival suits and life rafts,” says Barry. “And the Coast Guard should have seaworthiness inspections for older vessels.”

Meanwhile the families of three of the other drowned crew members have filed suit against the estate of Bouchard, who owned the boat, claiming “wrongful death due to the negligence of the captain.” Lisa McLain, the widow of one crewman, points out that she was pregnant when her husband died. “For a while I had to rely on the state [for welfare],” she says. “It has not been fun.”


Several of the parents of Western Sea victims have joined the Barrys’ crusade. Among them is Mrs. Rosemary Hofer of Brielle, N.J., mother of Christopher Hofer. “I had no idea of the danger until this happened,” she says. “Something has got to prevent these boys who have a sense of adventure from going out there.” And soon something might do just that: In the past month, three bills dealing with the problem have been introduced in the House of Representatives. Hearings are scheduled next week, and Peggy Barry is expected to testify. “In one way doing something like this helps,” she says. “It makes you feel like you are doing something that is connected to Peter, something that can help other kids.” Then she pauses. “But the grief is so visceral. I know it will never go away.”

=============

http://www.wavetrain.net/techniques-a-tactics/492-salvage-law-when-do-get-to-keep-an-abandoned-boat

SALVAGE LAW: Do You Get to Keep an Abandoned Boat?

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #41 on: July 26, 2017, 10:18:11 AM »
A lot of us veteran preppers tend to worry less about complete, and permanent collapse that leads to a MadMax RoadWarrior scenario.
The closest thing might be something like the LA Riots, multiplied several times.  Maybe a coup d'tat, etc.

Bugging out is extremely complex.  The pickle is, the closer you are to large urban centers, the higher your risk, but also the more difficult egress from the location becomes. If you already live in a rural town, your need to evac. is lower.

I'm sort of in between.  While I don't live in an urban center, I'm 20 miles out, and live along the major highway corridors. If holiday leisure traffic is any clue, the roads will be useless during a big emergency. The vast majority of situations are more appropriate for "bugging in" from my estimation.

The closest Marina is 8 miles west of my house.  Within 20 miles there are 4. It just seems a resource worth considering.
I also think it'd be fun to have a nice outdoor hobby.

Offline Sailor

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #42 on: July 26, 2017, 10:32:18 AM »
If you can sail a dingey well you can sail a much larger boat easily.  Key is just getting out there and doing it.  Just get on the water in any boat as much as possible.   Some guys at our marina in FL boat share.  Four families share one boat, and schedule their time on a shared google calendar.  It works well for them, as they are all friends and often go out together, and they are not boating full time.   It takes the right group of people though to pull that off. 

Offline shadowalker_returns

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #43 on: August 19, 2017, 12:22:18 AM »
The short answer is yes you can. The better answer is should you? On any non-Houseboat 30ft or less your not living aboard your camping aboard. A sailboat is the worst under 30ft boat to live aboard unless your single, an extreme minimalist, a bit of a masochist , skinny and short... No bullshit. I have been a live-aboard for real, as in it was my chosen life style up till my second wife and the 2 unplanned pregnancies... it is my go to life of choice and I am planning on returning to it again. My biggest boat was a 54 ft commercial conversion. I've lived aboard from Puget Sound to Florida bay and a whole lot of places in between... A 27ft sailboat of the proper type can be pleasant for one for a long time, 2 for much shorter time and 3 not for anytime more than a weekend. 30-33 ft is a better size. This assumes a full displacement hull. Some people said a sailboat is a must. They are wrong. Sailboats are mostly for romantics. The vast majority of truly successful long term live-aboarders live on powerboats. For two main reasons 1) Usable space and 2) Engines. In general power boats of equivalent length are more spacious. If properly designed and setup they can also be as space efficient as a good sailboat. Engines trump wind when you need to go NOW. When you take the long view and factor in the cost to maintain and replace the standing and running rigging along with necessary sail replacement, the over all cost of operation between a sailboat and an efficient power boat of similar displacement are remarkably close. Most sailboaters fail to mention this fact. Where sailboats can excel is for those few who love long distance blue-water cruising. Thats when sailboats can shine. Though I can still make a good case for an efficient powerboat of the proper design (and that would be my choice as well). as for size 27 ft is a great size to handle. Though any size can be singlehanded if designed, planned and equipped for it. I singlehanded my 54 ft all the time. Handling is really about pre-planning and experience, size is secondary. Your 27 footer would be a good choice for casual sailing/exploring camping aboard. If however you are a dedicated minimalist and are single then you could make a very good life for yourself aboard such a boat. At 27ft and depending on your hull/sail type, time and the weather will be your biggest enemies as your too small to push through weather and to slow to out run it. My first live aboard was a 22 ft houseboat like object, typically called a shanty boat. I loved it. Other more fru-fru ( ie. stuck up) boaters didn't. The real question is how do you want to use the vessel your living in. In-land waters or offshore? continuous movement or stop and go? Long term commitment or short term goal? and the big ones : how much Time, Money and Effort do you want or intend to spend on the vessel. if its mostly inland waters and bayous, you may want to consider sell trade up for a 30-35ft shallow draft high freeboard style Houseboat. Not to pretty but really practical for inland waterways stop and go or mostly stopped, live-aboarding. If you want to use your sailboat thats fine. here's how to do it. Ruthlessly evaluate its condition, then make the plans for needed changes to equip it to the level necessary for the use you intend, Make the changes and then Go For IT. The biggest disappointments in boating are the ones who wanted to go, who could go but never tried to go. Good luck to you.

Regards,
Shadowalker
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Offline John Doe

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #44 on: August 20, 2017, 11:28:01 AM »
This is an idea I got from a guy who has a boat ..

 Suppose you lived in Maine and you had a 27 foot sailboat. Would it make sense and be economical as well as reasonably safe if you could set off on the sailboat in the late summer/early fall and sail down the coast for the winter ? Perhaps you anchor off of the coast in various places, thereby you don't have to pay for a hotel or a campsite at least some of the time. You could anchor in some harbor or inlet and go ashore in a smaller boat. Perhaps you could bring a small folding bicycle. I would bring a surfboard of course.

  If you get down to Florida, the Caribbean, South America, etc, maybe you find someplace of the coast that is not too inhabited, maybe part of some island. You could do some gorilla gardening, pick coconuts, various fruits, citrus or what not; learn what is edible etc ... You could catch fish to eat etc.. maybe even catch some game somehow ... I guess you could bring a bow and arrow .. I think some kinds of pink oyster mushrooms grow like crazy where it is hot as well.

 Obviously there are costs, various hazards and things to be aware of, but it seems like an interesting idea ...

BTDT in 2008/9
In the recession my job & everyone's who worked for me went to India.
Instead of fighting thousands of ppl for few jobs I sailed my boat down to the Keys from Norfolk.
I was living on the boat as I was separated at the time (we're back together :)
I would only do it in a 27' boat if it was outfitted with solar & wind generator, a proper nav system, dinghy or kayak to get to shore, full coverage BOAT towing ins (for "WHEN" you run aground & if it was just me or just me & someone I was really close to who's for it as much as you are.
I had a 27' boat at 1st. It was small (to live on) for ONE person..
My 30' boat made all the difference & she was the one I sailed down. It took 6 weeks from Norfolk to go 1200 miles, BTW.
Plan out time for stops, storms & plan on averaging 50-70 miles/day at about 7 knots/hr avg.
My #1 piece of advice: Buy the book Book by Skipper Bob about free anchorages. He rates them on many different categories like depth, privacy, services, grocery mkts, view etc link.
I would do it again in a heart beat but I doubt the wife would be into it :/
You'll employ many survival skills along the way too!
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Offline RitaRose1945

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #45 on: August 20, 2017, 05:10:53 PM »
 :popcorn:

Offline shadowalker_returns

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #46 on: August 21, 2017, 03:10:41 PM »
BTDT in 2008/9

I would only do it in a 27' boat if it was outfitted with solar & wind generator, a proper nav system, dinghy or kayak to get to shore, full coverage BOAT towing ins (for "WHEN" you run aground & if it was just me or just me & someone I was really close to who's for it as much as you are.
I had a 27' boat at 1st. It was small (to live on) for ONE person..
My 30' boat made all the difference & she was the one I sailed down. It took 6 weeks from Norfolk to go 1200 miles, BTW.
Plan out time for stops, storms & plan on averaging 50-70 miles/day at about 7 knots/hr avg.
My #1 piece of advice: Buy the book Book by Skipper Bob about free anchorages. He rates them on many different categories like depth, privacy, services, grocery mkts, view etc link.
I would do it again in a heart beat but I doubt the wife would be into it :/
You'll employ many survival skills along the way too!

Just about everyone I know who has BTDT also say 30' is the smallest practical size. Averaging 7 knots on less than a 30ft waterline single hull displacement boat is cooking! Good advice on Skipper Bob's book. I can't tell how many times it came in handing while I was living on the hook on the Carolinas to Florida coasts. I swear by and not at their guides. I primarily use the Upper Gulf and Texas Guide nowadays. I keep the West Florida coasts guide and Okeechobee Guides current as well.

Regards,
Shadowalker
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Offline archer

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #47 on: August 21, 2017, 03:14:37 PM »
after spending a few days in 20' of a 60' ship, I now have a better understanding why 30' is better than smaller...


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Offline Fyrediver

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #48 on: September 26, 2017, 09:56:56 PM »
I have a former friend who is a Travel Nurse.  They live full time on their sailboat.  In the winter she works in the South, in the summer she works in the NE.  Of course, always in a port town.  Has a folding bicycle to pedal to work.  No rent etc and they move with the seasons. 

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #49 on: September 27, 2017, 11:20:10 AM »
BTDT in 2008/9
In the recession my job & everyone's who worked for me went to India.
Instead of fighting thousands of ppl for few jobs I sailed my boat down to the Keys from Norfolk.
I was living on the boat as I was separated at the time (we're back together :)
I would only do it in a 27' boat if it was outfitted with solar & wind generator, a proper nav system, dinghy or kayak to get to shore, full coverage BOAT towing ins (for "WHEN" you run aground & if it was just me or just me & someone I was really close to who's for it as much as you are.
I had a 27' boat at 1st. It was small (to live on) for ONE person..
My 30' boat made all the difference & she was the one I sailed down. It took 6 weeks from Norfolk to go 1200 miles, BTW.
Plan out time for stops, storms & plan on averaging 50-70 miles/day at about 7 knots/hr avg.
My #1 piece of advice: Buy the book Book by Skipper Bob about free anchorages. He rates them on many different categories like depth, privacy, services, grocery mkts, view etc link.
I would do it again in a heart beat but I doubt the wife would be into it :/
You'll employ many survival skills along the way too!


Regarding Skipper Bob, while that sort of content sounds fantastic, it also appears very regional specific (ICW).  I'm way up in Puget Sound.  I've checked out some library books that cover my regional marinas and anchorages, but not fantastic depth of detail.  I'm early in my sailing "career", but am going out this weekend.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #50 on: October 02, 2017, 01:50:20 PM »
Yesterday our family went out sailing in the afternoon.  It was both the biggest boat we'd sailed, and the first time my wife or I were the most experienced sailors on board.

Early in the day we had a few stressful points, but once we learned the running rigging of that particular boat, we got the sail trim dialed in and made the most of a light wind day.
This boat was a Catalina 27, and had a speedometer and depth meter.  First time I ever sailed with a speedometer, and it was GREAT.

To a non-sailor, it may sound strange, but it's difficult to estimate your VMG (velocity made good) without a lot of experience.  That speedo told the truth and gave us feedback as to how our sheets were trimmed.
Best we made was about 5.5 knots, but we were sailing.  We were out 5 hours and they time went by really fast.

While there's room for all in the cockpit, during tacks and jibes getting 4 people out of each other's way is not always smooth.  There was a reasonable cabin for the kids, but hanging down there wasn't fun.
While set on a given tack, my kids enjoyed sitting up towards the bow deck, but changing tacks would whack them with the jib sail, so that was only a temporarily seating location.

My kids are 13 and 11, not grown adults.  It would be awkward at best for more than a couple to live on such a boat for more than a long weekend I think.

Offline Carl

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Re: live/retire on a sailboat part of the year ?
« Reply #51 on: October 02, 2017, 02:00:54 PM »
  While it may be 'romantic', sailing can be rough and tough whenn in such small confines of a boat ,especially if winds and seas are larger.

I know a man,BOBBY WHITE ,who went naughtical and his adventure may be entertaining for some.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTSilpLdXWo&list=PLfyGJYbk3iSr_x19lqmg6H3w19NTpRDBY
Stop complaining about life and start Celebrating it .

I've reached the age where there is little left to learn the hard way.

If you had only one year,one month,or one day...Would you live your life differently?