Author Topic: My Daily Driver kit  (Read 3360 times)

JPBeck

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My Daily Driver kit
« on: January 21, 2015, 05:31:45 PM »
Hello, I was going through and checking on my supplies in my truck today and thought I'd snap some pictures. We use this truck as our road trip vehicle and my daily driver. We live in Earthquake and wildfire country. So I carry enough to support the four of us even if we had to walk a couple days home. There's alot in there, but I don't have to use it all at once.
So I cleaned it out first.
 

Cleaned out:

With the help of the lil one



So I went through it replaced the MRE's and got rid of a few things and added others.
Compartmentalized: Driver's side tools
 

Medical

 with a couple IFAKS




Clothes:


Sleeping gear:
3 USGI Bivi Sacs, 3 light weight sleeping bags, 3 poncho liners
1 nysil tarp
3 reuseable space tarps

 
Food:
6MRE's, rice, gravy, juice packets, dried soup, ect

Water:
Sweetwater Filer/ 5 gal water container in back of truck

Cooking kit:


Cutting tools:


Stuff:



Packs:


Put back in:










When it's put away none of it is visible.

I took out some flashlights, because I already have 3 in the truck, I added a couple books, and some activity books and a few toys for the kids. I added a small Camelbak HAWG pack for my 8 year old. I added a flannel blanket that is easier to get to, I added 2 ponchos, I took out some tools, but added a small come-along. I tossed the old maps and replaced them with newer ones.

endurance

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Re: My Daily Driver kit
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2015, 09:16:16 PM »
Nice kit. Since you mentioned wildfire, you might think about picking up a fire shelter or two. The new ones cost $150-300, but the previous generation had to be phased out by 2006 and they're all over eBay for $12-25 each. Just a little something for the truck that already has everything else. ;)

JPBeck

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Re: My Daily Driver kit
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2015, 09:47:13 PM »
I'd have to take something out-- I can't cram one more thing in there. LOL--  It took me a couple hours putting everything away today, it has to be put in just right or the seats wont close easily.

Can't I just put a shake'n bake bag in there and call it day?

Thanks for the reply :) I'll look at them.

Offline bcksknr

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Re: My Daily Driver kit
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2015, 05:16:29 AM »
     I like that you have "compartmentalized" your equipment along the lines of function. One issue that I would have is the number of individualized "modules" that you have. I know how difficult it is to fit gear into the nooks and crannies of a vehicle; my concern would be that in having to exit the vehicle, something important may get left behind. I also understand that with multiple family members, especially children, the amount that can be physically carried is limiting. The items that children carry should be in proportion to the importance of the survival gear. If a child drops or misplaces his bag of clothes it may not be as life threatening as if he was carrying the first aid kit. Either way, each individual/child should have a set of the  "basics" on his person. That way if they become separated they can at least have a space blanket, plastic poncho, "glow-stick", whistle, power/energy bar and maybe age appropriate fire starter and cutting implement. All children should have a picture of Mom and Dad and a laminated card with as much family information as appropriate (including blood type). Don't forget a small stuffed animal or comfort item with each child's things.
     I'm lucky in that I have space behind the seats of my truck that most of my stuff fits into one large pack. There is a separate, expanded first aid kit in its own bag. Because of my northern location and Winter conditions, I have to seasonally adjust. I have the four part military sleeping setup and a separate pack of winter clothing/footwear. I would hate to have to abandon my vehicle as it provides excellent shelter and a treasure trove of survival resources, even if it won't run any longer.
     Two final suggestions: although it may seems "anal", I start with small individual items and seal them in waterproof "Seal-a-Meal" type bags. Then I put like items (first aid, food, clothing, etc,) in waterproof bags or containers. Many items can be ruined or rendered unusable by moisture (or dirt). If you have to leave on foot, you don't want to lose resources to water damage (think wet clothing, sleeping bags, etc.). Secondly, I would find space for an appropriately sized pack or duffle for each family member (stored empty to save space and fit your modular plan), that could be filled with their share of the separate items spread through out the vehicle. Have a list of whose bag gets what so that if you have to abandon your vehicle, each person has a portion of equipment they can carry and hopefully nothing critical gets left behind. You could even color code each module with a piece of colored duct tape; Mom carries blue items, Billy carries red, etc.). The less detail you have to think about the better; you will have enough on your mind in an emergency. Best of luck! 
     

JPBeck

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Re: My Daily Driver kit
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2015, 09:21:23 AM »
Thanks, I am right there with you, but I think I have everything you mentioned (except I only have one water proof bag in my Eagle). If you look at the photos you'll see that I do have packs for everyone. My wife has a North-Face "Becker patrol" type pack (one long deep compartment, and my 8 year old has a CamelBak HAWG. I have everything that we would absolutely need in that Eagle backpack (under the seat) ready to jam. Although I didn't list everything out, or take pictures of every item, I assure you I have everything you listed or at least have those items covered by something similar. We are on the same page my friend. 
I  have enough in the to fully outfit everyone in the truck, including personal "comfort type items for the kids" (they don't do the stuffed animal or blanket thing).  I don't do the cheap space blanket thing because we have light weight snugpak sleeping bags and space tarps, plus everyone has a US GI BIVI sac. My kids are not old enough for cutting or fire starting tools (but when they are I will include them- thanks for the reminder).  I may not know alot but I know the basics. You are correct though, I would have to assemble everyone else's kits which would take time.  It's just one of those things that you can't plan for everything, and I just don't have the space to keep 3 packs loaded. I'm doing the best I can, with the space I have. Thanks for your time and suggestions. 

Offline low_tech

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Re: My Daily Driver kit
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2015, 11:35:03 AM »
Nice set up ... if you can find room, I'd add a fire extinguisher and a few bottled waters.

endurance

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Re: My Daily Driver kit
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2015, 12:25:15 PM »
Nice set up ... if you can find room, I'd add a fire extinguisher and a few bottled waters.
I totally missed that. Good call. I just had to replace my extinguisher a few months ago after using it to put out an engine fire involving a car on the side of the highway.

Offline bcksknr

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Re: My Daily Driver kit
« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2015, 01:53:52 PM »
     Water is somewhat of an issue for me because of climate. In the warm months, I have a couple of gallons in the four liter, Nalgene type jugs. In winter I have to empty them to avoid freezing and bursting. Even partially filling them won't work well, because heating them (a big block of ice in plastic) to melt the ice into water is problematic. Either way, I have an assortment of collapsible water bladders to fill with what is available. If I have to go on foot, they can be filled from the gallon jugs (in Summer) or melted snow or ice in the Winter and fit better into a hiking plan than jugs.
     The pouches of emergency (lifeboat) water, about 4oz. each, are filled so that they can freeze without bursting and would be easier to "peel" and melt in a metal cup. They are too small an amount to supply water for long, but an appropriate amount could stave off thirst until an adequate water source could be found. Hopefully, your climate may reduce the need for Winter planning, such as frozen supplies.
     For Winter, I also keep a box of "shake and bake", dry chemical hand and larger body warmers in the truck. they make a huge difference when trying to thaw out fingers to light a stove or wood fire. Drop one in each glove and boot to keep hands and feet toasty. If you have a cold child at night, a body sized warmer, put into an old sock (to prevent burns) and tucked into a sleeping bag, can help them stay warm and comforted. If the kids aren't happy, no ones happy. Also,have something to insulate your body from the cold ground when sleeping. I use the G.I. closed cell foam pad; no comfort, but good insulation. I recently got a tip on a "big-box" hardware supplier item. They sell rolls of insulation that are only about a quarter inch thick. They consist of a layer of "bubble wrap" sandwiched between two layers of foil. Easy to cut to size, it weighs almost nothing and can be a sleeping pad or reflective sunshade. A 2x6 foot piece would really get a search planes attention, if needed. It could also be a lifesaver if stranded in desert conditions. If I lived in a hot climate, I think I'd have a roll of H.D. "broiler" aluminum foil in the vehicle. Along with the obvious uses, it could block the sun by covering the vehicle's southern windows, creating a "sun shelter". Shelter from desert sun is probably a whole 'nother chapter and may not apply to your situation. 
     Speaking of which; for Summer everyone needs a brimmed hat and maximum SPF sunscreen. I also pack repellent and mosquito netting. Nothing will drive you nuts like bug bites on top of sunburn.

JPBeck

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Re: My Daily Driver kit
« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2015, 03:53:40 PM »
HATS -- how could I have forgotten those! My bald head thanks you sir!

I forgot  to post these. So much crap-- such little attention span-- look squirrel!  :)

I keep a 5gal bucket in the back. I think I mentioned that in passing, but I forgot to post the picture. I have a friend that gives me these 5 gal containers. They are a little thicker walled then most. I like them because if someone swipes it, it's no big deal, and I can take it out if I need to use the bed to transport stuff. Because the sun beats down on them I replace them a couple times a year.

I have a fire extinguisher in the front seat. It'd be nice to have a bigger one, but I keep forgetting.