Author Topic: Fuel storage  (Read 13801 times)

Offline JetstreamJonny

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Fuel storage
« on: October 20, 2008, 09:20:42 AM »
I've finally started getting to grips with listing and prioritising my preparations which includes buying a 20l Gerry can and filling it with diesel once a month until I have enough stored for about 400 miles. I picked up on one little word that Jack slipped into his podcast recently which was "Stabilized" fuel. After a bit of reseach I found that diesel is far from stable after quite a short time and is particularly susceptible to algae which degrades the fuel. There are a quite a few available additives, can anyone recommend an additive that they have found effective? I'd welcome any experience that you have to offer on the subject of fuel storage.
Cheers - Jon

Offline ElyasWolff

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2008, 09:48:16 AM »
You can use PRI-D.
http://www.priproducts.com/pridpage.htm
I have used the PRI-G and Sta-Bil, but have not kept fuel for over 6 months (Also good for motorcycles and gennnys)

I personally will stay from cheap thin plastic fuel cans. You are on the right track with a steel jerry can. With a good gasket they wont leak vapors or let air in, and they are just plain safer.

If you can find them Scepter MFCs are nice.

0degreesK

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2008, 10:46:57 AM »
This past weekend, I just cycled through my canned fuel because when I bought and filled them, I didn't know anything about fuel stabilizers.  So I took the cans to the gas station, filled my car with them and then refilled the cans with Sta-Bil.  Regardless, I still plan to cycle through every 3-4 months to keep the canned stuff more or less fresh.

Does anyone know if kerosene needs fuel stabilizer and what to use for that?

Offline Stein

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2008, 02:42:35 PM »
I use Stabil, but it is for gasoline.  Unfortunately, I have the $5 Wally-World gas cans and want to upgrade but haven't due to the price.  I would love to pick up 4 Scepter MFC cans, but they are just about non-existant due to the new regulations coming up on 1/1/09.  It is a crime we can't buy those for $25-30 like we should be able to.

Dan Holiday

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2008, 07:44:12 AM »
"I would love to pick up 4 Scepter MFC cans, but they are just about non-existant due to the new regulations coming up on 1/1/09."

What are the new regulations that take effect on 1/1/09?


Offline ElyasWolff

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2008, 09:21:22 AM »
"I would love to pick up 4 Scepter MFC cans, but they are just about non-existant due to the new regulations coming up on 1/1/09."

What are the new regulations that take effect on 1/1/09?



All cans have to be CARB approved nation wide. It is just another example of overactive govt passing laws, and trying to justify it's own existence

John Bennett

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2008, 03:58:20 PM »
How sick is it that these 11 jerks get to determine what kind of gas can 300 million people can use to fuel their lawn mower...

http://www.arb.ca.gov/board/members.htm



Offline CTF250

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2008, 03:53:43 PM »
Ive found a boating product named Starburst works the best for extending gas use.  I have a 100 gallon transfer tank with electric pump ( the kind you see in the back of contractors pick up trucks) and I keep around 80 gallons on hand most of the time and use the starbright to keep it clean from algea.  Also I like the transfer pump as it has an inline filter to filter the fuel as it comes out of the tank.  Its like having my own personal gas station on my property

Ive been using this for a year and never had a problem in the gas quality and use. 

For diesel, try getting some anti gel if winter temps are an issue.  Other than that theres Marvel mystery oil, good to add to diesel just follow the directions on the can.

Offline lonestar

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2008, 08:25:00 PM »
I have a question about the transfer tank,  Is it possible to put one in a truck bed that has a camper top on it?  would there be any problems doing that?

Offline ElyasWolff

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2008, 08:37:18 PM »
I have a question about the transfer tank,  Is it possible to put one in a truck bed that has a camper top on it?  would there be any problems doing that?

There will probably be interference issues with it. You may have to have it custom made. IMHO make sure it is TIG wielded out of AL (6061) and pressure tested before money changes hands.

Offline wbo3

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2008, 08:41:09 PM »
I keep 5 cans in the garage, I use them every 1-2 weeks to fuel my truck and then go refill them.  I do not have to worry about stabilizers because the gas is never in there more than a few weeks at a time.  I need to get an out building to store them in, but that opens a host of problems dealing with the restrictions in my neighborhood...so I just store them as far away from the house as I can, right by the garage door.

Offline Lowdown3

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2008, 07:28:07 AM »
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pByAgmd5Sj0

Video on how to store gasoline you might find helpful.

Lowdown3

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2008, 03:56:17 PM »
I have a question about the transfer tank,  Is it possible to put one in a truck bed that has a camper top on it?  would there be any problems doing that?

Lonestar,  I would be very concerned about doing that.  The truck bed is likely to hold vapors that could ignite if they found an ignition source (ie someone throwing a cigarette) 

Why do you want to do that?  If it is for security you can get tanks that bolt to the truck body and have locks for fuel access.

Offline John Willis

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #13 on: November 06, 2008, 08:00:08 PM »
I kept about 20 5 gallon cans. Most were NATO cans. Several old Jerry cans and a bunch of specter mil plastic. Kept gas untreated in shade in back yard under a work bench. Rotated it every 6 months or so. Ran about 30 gallons that was over a year old in the truck at one time so the tank was almost empty. Truck ran no problems at all.

I kept 5 5 gallon cans in the back of my Yukon. I used the round plastic kind like you buy at a dirt bike shop. The truck smelled of gas but once the doors were opened it would go away. It only smelled in the summer. Once I changed to the NATO can there was no smell at all.

I not keep 5 NATO can in the Yukon at all times and 6 Nato cans in the back of my f-250 at all times. The NATO cans can be kept sideways or even upside down. They do not leek and you get no smell at all. They do build a bit of pressure on a warm day though and when you open the lid a bit of gas will spray out. Remember to cover with a towel.

When i fill the truck I don't even take the cans out of the bed. I just use a super siphon and run it straight into the tank.

John Willis
www.SOEtacticalgear.com

« Last Edit: November 06, 2008, 08:01:41 PM by John Willis »

Storm

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #14 on: December 23, 2008, 04:02:12 PM »
Do you guys use Gold Eagle Sta-Bil? If so, how much does it normally run and in how big of a container?

Offline firetoad

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2008, 10:34:01 AM »
Just a healthy bump and reminder that you might want to get those Nato gas cans now if it isn't already too late!


http://www.4wheeloutfitters.com/store/  [Scroll down and review what is written on the page about the cans]

http://www.britishpacific.com/BPSite/landroverparts/NATOjerryCans.html

There are still places selling them for now such as Coleman's and Maine Military Supply, but...

Offline ejsandstrom

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2008, 02:50:03 PM »
Diesel fuel (the real stuff not bio) does not get bad enough to worry about. Please try to tell me different. I have seen diesel that was 40 years old in both above and below ground. It ran generators with out a hick up. Any water sinks and filters can clean up the suspended stuff. You may get some white smoke from it. Also in the several states I have lived in, alge has never been an issue. I wouldent worry about filling a drum full and push it into the corner of the garage.

Offline JetstreamJonny

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2009, 08:12:48 AM »
I take your point. Lots of the advice on fuel storage seems to come from people who sell fuel stabilisers!
I store enough diesel to fill my bug out vehicle and take it 500 miles (enough where I live) - I'll replace that fuel each year.
The way I see it though, my life may depend on that fuel one day so I'm prepared to chuck a little Sta-bil in so there's one less thing to worry about.

Cheers - Jon

HumeMan

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2009, 03:00:18 PM »
So I decided to start off small and bought a 10L Jerry Can at the surplus shop today.


I do have a few questions though.  First, what the heck is this?  All the cans at the store had one in them.  It's filled with a kinda pink rock salt.  I assumed it was to absorb moisture or something, but the lady at the counter couldn't tell me.


Secondly, I know you guys have talked about replacing the gasket once you first get them and this one is badly in need of one before it's put into service.  Where can I order a replacement gasket?  Thanks.

HumeMan

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #19 on: February 24, 2009, 08:00:32 PM »
Well, if I lived in England I suppose this wouldn't be an issue.  I can't seem to find ANY U.S. sites that sell these things.  Grrrrr.

http://www.surplusandadventure.com/shop/army-surplus/military-equipment/genuine-army-jerry-can-20-litre-291636.html
http://www.demon-tweeks.co.uk/products/ProductDetail.asp?cls=MCYCLE&pcode=JERSEAL

Offline firetoad

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HumeMan

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #21 on: February 24, 2009, 08:19:47 PM »
Thank You!  ;D

HumeMan

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #22 on: March 07, 2009, 08:26:19 PM »
JamesYeager posted this in another thread.  Thought it should propagate.

http://www.omahas.com/product_info.php?products_id=2232

Think I might just have to order a couple.   :)

texas hiker

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #23 on: May 16, 2009, 04:44:54 PM »
For fuel storage, I use 16 gallon drums.  Check the local feed and fertilizer stores.  These drums were used to store a type of syrup - the inside smells like Dr. Pepper.  Just wash them out real good and let them dry for a few days.

Offline union hill

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #24 on: May 16, 2009, 05:39:23 PM »
I just installed a 275 gallon diesel tank out in my equipment shed. I have a diesel generator and this could keep the power on for a few weeks continuous or a few months intermittent. I have a diesel truck I can rotate my storage through.  I'm looking at a pto mounted generator for my diesel tractor as a backup. I have about 10 5-6 gallon plastic jugs, and if I had to leave my property I would fill the vehicle and the jugs to extend my range.

Offline JPH

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #25 on: May 16, 2009, 08:24:53 PM »
For about everything except vehicles look at LP gas.  Especially for generators!!!!

I have stated a thread here http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=5635.new#new so that I don't hijack this one, but if anyone has any ideas let us know...

HumeMan

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #26 on: June 08, 2009, 08:39:23 PM »
Has anyone bought or tried the Scepter Eco Cans?  I was in PepBoys today and they had a display.  Seemed pretty rugged.

I know the handle and cap size is different than on the $70 MFCs, Im just very interested in knowing if the gauge/quality of the plastic is any different.  Especially because they were selling for only $18!!



 They also had Scepter blue water cans, but the plastic was noticibly thinner compared to the red ones.




Offline ejsandstrom

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #27 on: June 09, 2009, 05:38:17 AM »
For about everything except vehicles look at LP gas.  Especially for generators!!!!

I have stated a thread here http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=5635.new#new so that I don't hijack this one, but if anyone has any ideas let us know...


Not so fast there.....

Many delivery vehicles run on LP, and a few passenger cars as well.

A diesel can run on a LP fuel mix, some use it as NO2 type boost, others run it all the time.

Offline chrisdfw

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #28 on: June 09, 2009, 06:38:21 PM »
For about everything except vehicles look at LP gas.  Especially for generators!!!!

I have stated a thread here http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=5635.new#new so that I don't hijack this one, but if anyone has any ideas let us know...

LP gas stores great and runs vehicles fine too.

Offline “Mark”

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Re: Fuel storage
« Reply #29 on: June 10, 2009, 09:10:14 AM »
Works great until about -42C (-43.6F), where it stays liquid (but have fun stopping your diesel from gelling, too!). But if that's not an issue where you live, propane is an excellent fuel for vehicle longevity. It actually cleans the engine as it runs. The only downside is that burning it releases less kenetic energy in the form of gaseous expansion during combustion versus heat, so propane engines run hotter to deliver the same power.