Author Topic: Woodworking Forum\questions.  (Read 9102 times)

Offline Cedar

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Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #30 on: March 28, 2017, 01:47:13 PM »
One of the folks, I was hoping who would answer.. thanks..

Do you think that the mold will be deep into the pourous oak wood or probably just on the surface/shellac/varnish? Like HOW pourous is Oak? I did not try to clean them yet, as I was advised not to until now. And I cannot easily get to hem yet, but I am compiling information and then when I am ready to get to them, I have worked out all the angles maybe.

CA is a brand of super glue? Is it super glue or a wood glue? Just a regular vacuum like a shop vacuuum?

These are pre-1900, so I am thinking they are probably shellec? They did not use varnish until after 1920's?

My concern is if it is into the wood.. I will need to sand and refinish.

I am hoping it is just cleaning, and then the denatured alcohol, and re-shellac.

Thanks,
Cedar
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Offline David in MN

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Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #31 on: March 28, 2017, 02:25:34 PM »
CA is super glue. It's short for cyranoacrilate (or something similar) and any super glue uses it. Shop vacuum and ideally slow setting super glue is best. Not a good time for wood glue. It won't bond as strong and will be more visible.

How porous is oak... Depends. Old oak usually isn't as bad as stuff cut these days. Lumberjacks were choosier back then.

Don't despair the mold. If you strip it, sand it, clean with alcohol you should be ok unless this will be beach front furniture. Most hard wood just needs to dry.

If it is shellac you can spot refinish. If lacquer or varnish (my bet based on appearance) you likely need to chemically strip and refinish the whole piece. Big ass-pain. But I bet an industrius ancestor did a varnish job. Shellac usually doesn't last long on heavy use furniture. I use it for picture frames and artistic pieces. You need to test with alcohol to know.

Don't feel rushed! As long as it is drying you are moving in the right direction. I'd hit it with alcohol to clean the surface mold and get to it was nice time.

I just finished a restore of a period piece. It can be a mess. Layers of different finishes, lousy repairs. Go slow. And keep in mind the goals. If you perfectly sand and refinish all the blemishes and uneven finish you might find you ruined the heirloom look. I usually go own a bit darker and even use contrasting stain to emphasize scuffs and dings so it looks like the chairs grandpa smoked in. Heirloom isn't about looking like new, it's about keeping memories alive.
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Offline Cedar

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Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #32 on: March 28, 2017, 02:38:39 PM »
The reason I think the table is shellac, is if I was wiping it down with a wet rag to clean my table, as one ought to do from time to time when you have small a small child, the finish was 'sticky', tacky', until it dried.  The chairs are not original to the table, so they could be varnish or something else.

Cedar
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Offline FreeLancer

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Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #33 on: March 28, 2017, 03:23:29 PM »
If the spinning wheel is warped, it might not be worth the effort. I don't know what kind of forces are involved with spinning, but you might also consider an epoxy for both its strength and gap filling properties.

I recently used T88 to repair the lid on an ash chest I made decades ago and it worked amazingly well, both in strength and appearance.  It sets really slow so I had plenty of time to work all the delicate shattered edges back into place and the gap filling made up for not being able to clamp all the pieces over the 18" crack as tight as I would have with any other glue. Best of all, I didn't have to sand and refinish, it blended so well.  For thin gaps, I used the thin goretex dental floss to work enough epoxy in. I was very pleasantly surprised with how well it worked.

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/system-three-t88-epoxy-1-2-pint?gclid=CIu445yO-tICFQ9EfgodrA4DVw
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Offline Cedar

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Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #34 on: March 28, 2017, 03:50:10 PM »
Thanks freelancer,

So you think I can just fill in those gaps? That would be great if I could. It may not have been the most expensive wheel ever, but it ran well, and I had many hours of spinning on it. I also HAD a Louet S-15, which is actually worth more money, but we did not make friends as well as this wheel and I did.

I was thinking I am going to have to take the whole wheel apart, as the last time I handled it, it would not even turn. I was thinking of sanding it, varnishing it, and if it did not run right, using it as a outside display.

The wheel should be pretty much balanced to actually use it. Wonky wheels are no fun..... the really old antique ones are just to look at most of the time..

I do.. or did have the book, "Care and Feeding of your Spinning Wheel", (which is also a repair book, sorta), but at the moment I am uncertain if I have that book or not, but maybe I can get it at the library.

Thanks for the advice/tips...

Cedar
"Do not breathe simply to exist."

"Make now always the most precious time. Now will never come again." - Jean Luc Picard

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Offline Stwood

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Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #35 on: March 28, 2017, 04:33:17 PM »
Looks like they have you headed in the right direction.
Might give the mold a wipe down with bleach so it will stunt the mold until you get to working on them.
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Offline RitaRose1945

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Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #36 on: March 29, 2017, 03:47:34 PM »
 :knitting:

Offline AvenueQ

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Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #37 on: April 27, 2017, 01:29:45 PM »
Oo, oo, there's spinning wheel stuff here! *waves hands excitedly*

I agree with FreeLancer on the epoxy filler, I used it all the time to fill minor blemishes when I worked for Schacht (one of Ashford's main competitors). You can mix it with some wood dust of a similar color if you really want to go nuts with color matching, but that can also be disastrous if you get the wrong color. Use more than you think you need, as epoxy shrinks as it dries, then sand it off after it's hardened.

I would suggest a THOROUGH greasing on all the major motion points on the wheel. You can use light machine oil (think sewing machine oil), but my favorite to use on metal is white lithium grease (I use this on the flyer shaft of my wheel). Dry bicycle chain lube will work as well. Warp is only one of many things that can cause a stuck wheel, it's probably going to take some trial and error to figure out what the problem is.

If nothing else, Ashford is still in business: https://www.ashford.co.nz/ (that looks like either a Traditional or an Elizabeth to me). They're based out of New Zealand, but you could see if there's a dealer near you that might do repairs if you decide it's too much for you. Wish I was closer, I'd totally come over and take a look at it for you.

Offline NWPilgrim

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Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #38 on: April 29, 2017, 03:18:49 AM »
If you are going to be doing woodworking of any scale in an apartment you need to plan for management of dust and shavings.  Hand tools and small projects will minimize this, but still, most woodworking is taking rough wood and removing material in steps from large pieces to dust and then assembling them.  Have a small shop vac handy and maybe put down a temporary hard surface such as masonic sheet to make clean up easier.  If you use any power tools try to get models that have a built in dust bag.  They don't catch 100% of the dust but maybe 80% which is much better than none.  You might want to have enclosed cabinets to store supplies versus open shelves that will more easily collect airborne dust. Or have throw clothes handy for when you are sanding.

Agree about importance of learning to sharpen and care for your hand tools.  Buy decent quality tools and then treat them well each time you use them.

We have a hardwood distributor about 15 miles away that carries a limited but decent variety of cherry, walnut, oak, hickory, teak, etc.  Anything from large pieces and floor planks, to smaller pieces. Not a mill, just a warehouse of hardwoods.  You can special order from their catalog as well.  Check with your local woodworking stores.  They usually sell the very small pieces for making pens and such, but not the large pieces.  It will be expensive to buy individual small pieces so you want to find a source for large pieces that you can cut into many smaller ones to get the cost efficiency.  Or find a local woodworker that does large projects (table tops, furniture, etc.) and often has small pieces left over he does not use but you could. If you do inlays you could make use of lots of very small pieces most other guys would scrap.  One idea I saw in a flooring book was inlays for floors, such as medallions to give it an extra special touch on a quality hardwood floor.  Could be anything from a few inches wide to a couple of feet, usually a mix of contrasting woods in some neat design (rose, sunburst, intertwined coils, etc.).

Just FYI, the lathe is a machine designed to spew dust and scraps in more directions and further than any other man-made device. Stay away!
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Offline DheereCrossing

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Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #39 on: May 19, 2017, 08:17:28 AM »
I don't get to the forums much so I just saw this.

Red oak is more porous than white oak and it looks like white oak from the close up of the chair damage.  White oak stands up much better to age and weather - the red oak I've used seems to mildew faster outdoors and that may be due to the pores allowing the airflow deeper and a better path for the spores.

The first thing I would try on the blue/green mold and the areas to refinish would be lacquer thinner - the cleaning properties of it are pretty awesome and that will also tell you if a soft film finish was used.  Next go to denatured alcohol like others have suggested - that would soften shellac.  Next you can head up the ladder and try paint thinner/mineral spirits.  Finally, if you haven't disturbed the finish at this point, you may want to try a chemical paste stripper - you can apply that to a small area like the inside of a chair leg, let it sit for 30 minutes and then scrape it off and see what it does.  If you get down to bare wood with any of these chemicals, you can then neutralize the chemicals with a baking soda solution.  If you wind up taking the finish off, to preserve the patina of the wood itself, I wouldn't sand or get aggressive on surface modification.  Just choose your finish and go.  Personally, I would be hard pressed not to start with an oil finish with an orange shellac topcoat(s).  You have three basic choices in oils, Tung oil, Danish oil (Watco), or linseed oil.  Those are in order from lightest to darkest as well.  Thin the first applications of oil 25% oil to 75% mineral spirits to assist with deeper penetration. Next coats 50/50, 75/25, and then finally full strength undiluted oil.  On a new project I would be applying the last few coats of oil while wet-sanding with 320 grit sandpaper.  If you decide to go with linseed oil, start with raw linseed and then use boiled linseed for the final applications - it will take a LONG time to dry but be impervious to water damage for ever.  After the oil, you can go to the shellac.

No matter what finish you have - as long as it's cleaned and smooth, meaning it looks and feels OK, you can put shellac over it without stripping, (shellac is a great barrier between dissimilar finishes)  If the current finish is already shellac, then great, you've just added additional applications and allowed it to flow together.  If it's a harder film finish such as varnish or poly, then shellac will go on top of it without problems and not react badly at all.

If you want to use shellac, I would recommend against buying premixed, (BullsEye), shellac in a can.  The shelf life of mixed shellac is only around 30-60 days.  If you can still find them, buy dry flakes and mix your own.  I usually mix up a jar of 1 pound (thinner) and a jar of 3 pound (thicker/darker) cut shellac.

Shellac is a soft film finish - if you leave that as the final topcoat, be prepared for it to damage easily and wear quickly - it's meant for looking, not using.  However, being that shellac is a great barrier between other finishes, you can top coat the table top or anywhere that takes wear with a oil or water based varnish or polyurethane for final protection.
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Offline Cedar

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Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #40 on: June 02, 2017, 12:42:26 AM »
Just saw the other replies about my table and spinning wheel. They are still in storage, but I hope to have a home for them by the end of summer, and then be able to work on them. Thank you very much.

Cexar
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"Make now always the most precious time. Now will never come again." - Jean Luc Picard

"A person who works with his hands is a laborer, A person who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman, A person who works with his hands, his head and his heart is an artist."