Author Topic: bicycles & the Disaster Relief Trials  (Read 2903 times)

Offline Alan Georges

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4589
  • Karma: 210
  • Still trying to reason with hurricane season.
bicycles & the Disaster Relief Trials
« on: October 21, 2015, 05:39:16 PM »
There was a little discussion of this over on the Motoped thread, but DRT is cool enough that it deserves its own thread.  Here's that mention in the other thread:
There are even groups who do cargo bike races.  These guys have their race centered around a disaster-relief scenario, where participants have to navigate around and over obstacles while carrying 100+ lbs of cargo, as well as three eggs.  The eggs represent sensitive emergency supplies (medicine, for example) and a broken egg means a time penalty.  These cats cover a 25 mile course in about two hours, including portages and barriers.  You don't have to have a 24-ounce carbon nanotube race bike to haul ass...

Nice article about the latest DRT with plenty of pictures at Bicycle Times.

endurance

  • Guest
Re: bicycles & the Disaster Relief Trials
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2015, 05:42:02 PM »
Very cool!  There's a lot of places that would beat normal responses by many fold.

Offline Alan Georges

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4589
  • Karma: 210
  • Still trying to reason with hurricane season.
Re: bicycles & the Disaster Relief Trials
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2015, 07:43:16 PM »
There's a lot of places that would beat normal responses by many fold.
I can say, a bike was the way to get around town after Katrina.  There was so much debris in roads that it was hard to drive anywhere with flatting a car tire, but I never caught a nail in a bike tire the entire month or so after K-day.  Even if I had, a bike tire is a lot easier to patch.  Throw in the "doesn't need gas" part and it makes a pretty attractive way to go.

Never hauled much though.  A simple rack and some bungies got me as far as a chainsaw or a couple of two-liter water bottles, the most I ever had to haul.  Those DRT folks are hauling way more than that.  Impressive.

Offline FreeLancer

  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 6696
  • Karma: 819
Re: bicycles & the Disaster Relief Trials
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2015, 08:04:49 PM »
 :popcorn:

Offline scoob

  • Senior Survivalist
  • ****
  • Posts: 290
  • Karma: 24
  • Chicken-farming knuckle-dragger
    • Marksmanship, History, Civic Engagement
Re: bicycles & the Disaster Relief Trials
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2015, 08:41:14 PM »
 :clap:  That's freakin' cool!

Offline RuggedCyclist

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 805
  • Karma: 29
  • Capitalist hippie
    • Boulder Stonecraft
Re: bicycles & the Disaster Relief Trials
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2015, 10:49:35 PM »
I can say, a bike was the way to get around town after Katrina.  There was so much debris in roads that it was hard to drive anywhere with flatting a car tire, but I never caught a nail in a bike tire the entire month or so after K-day.  Even if I had, a bike tire is a lot easier to patch.  Throw in the "doesn't need gas" part and it makes a pretty attractive way to go.

Never hauled much though.  A simple rack and some bungies got me as far as a chainsaw or a couple of two-liter water bottles, the most I ever had to haul.  Those DRT folks are hauling way more than that.  Impressive.

Exactly why my bike is my bike. And why I have lots of spare tubes.

endurance

  • Guest
Re: bicycles & the Disaster Relief Trials
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2015, 07:19:04 AM »
I have a BOB suspension trailer, but I don't have much experience with it. I've also had both front and rear panyards on a bike, but I did not like weight on the front panyards in the way it changed my steering. No matter how you haul it, cargo dramatically impacts the handling on a bike. My trailer constantly wants to push me in a straight line and cornering speeds really need to be reduced, but even with 60 pounds I the trailer, it was a lot easier to move over distance on a bike than on my back. True, I found myself in my granny gear a lot more than normal, but it wasn't any slower than my average walking speed and on the level and downhill, the speed was dramatically higher than I could ever move with a load on my back.

The trials idea is a good one. For me, I don't ride with a load often enough to learn tricks, like how to distribute the load between my back, rear panyards, and trailer for maximum efficiency.