Author Topic: Sevin Dust  (Read 16439 times)

dhallftworth

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Sevin Dust
« on: May 15, 2009, 09:09:49 AM »
Is there anybody who is using sevin dust? What's your opinion?

Offline FreeSpirit

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2009, 09:30:23 AM »
Sevin dust is pretty effective and is used to control a wide variety of pests, including moths, beetles, cockroaches, ants, ticks, and mosquitoes. It is however toxic to humans and a suspected carcinogen because it increased tumors in mice.
Because it is a carbamate, it is easily metabolized in the body if ingested. It kills beneficial insects along with the targeted crowd. It has a reputation of wiping out whole colonies of bees. A small amount of bees take it back to the colony and wipe out the others. It is banned in several countries. It has been around since I was young.
It is thought to break down in water and sunlight in less than 6 months. It is not thought to be highly toxic to birds, but some aquatic life is affected by its presence.
My opinion is to try and find another way to control pests if possible. The affect it has on bees is enough for me to not use it. We need the bees!
Americans have the right and advantage of being armed - unlike the citizens of other countries whose governments are afraid to trust the people with arms.
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“The secret of happiness is freedom. The secret of freedom is courage.”
Thucydides (Ancient Greek historians and author, 460-404bc)

Offline Hartmann

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2009, 09:50:36 AM »
Believe it or not the Vet used to tell us to put it on our dogs to control fleas.  That was in FL where fleas are rampant and don't die off, but still I regret doing that now that I know more about sevin dust.
"The shortest answer is doing the thing."  -Hemingway

Offline FreeSpirit

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2009, 10:34:15 AM »
Believe it or not the Vet used to tell us to put it on our dogs to control fleas.  That was in FL where fleas are rampant and don't die off, but still I regret doing that now that I know more about sevin dust.
This is how I became introduced to the product. It was thought to be safe for pets and humans. In some ways it is safer than alternatives. My Grandad is the one the warned me about its use. He stopped using it on the chicken coop area and switched to using diatoms for mites. He was very wise, land-wise.

In a drastic situation (life or death), I might feel compelled to use it, but I believe there are other options that will work for us. We just need to work a bit harder and apply temperance.  We will all benefit down the road.

btw - DDT got the bad rap for decimating bird populations, Sevin should have been included as a suspect as well. Even if it was only for a short time, there is evidence to show it thins the shells of bird eggs.
Americans have the right and advantage of being armed - unlike the citizens of other countries whose governments are afraid to trust the people with arms.
James Madison

“The secret of happiness is freedom. The secret of freedom is courage.”
Thucydides (Ancient Greek historians and author, 460-404bc)

dhallftworth

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2009, 02:32:46 PM »
I have to do something pretty quick before stuff starts dieing... So i need alternative ideas...  ???

Offline FreeSpirit

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2009, 02:54:46 PM »
I have to do something pretty quick before stuff starts dieing... So i need alternative ideas...  ???
What insects have declared war on you? 
There is no way to keep all of nature out of your garden. The key for me is to try and strike a balance. Try not to overreact. Some sacrifice is acceptable to me to gain a wider flora and fauna. I have seen other insects and birds cure an early detected problem with no effort on my part. Analyze carefully if you can and react accordingly. Identify the problem and the critter if you can.
I am always flattered whenever I grow something that other life considers worthy of attacking. My job is to protect, fend off, and occassionally share.
Try using multiple strategies and watch carefully to see what your plants and garden activity is telling you. I killed several worms today by hand. I noticed the moths were active recently and followed up after the eggs hatched. Spraying seemed to slow them down, but hand picking was needed to eliminate. I do not mind the time needed for the smaller areas. I also isolated plants with different strategies so that I could learn for future crops. I try not to use a shotgun approach and kill everything. A balanced garden will tend itself. Keeping the balance is the key.
I am having good success with a cross-section of strategies in my arsenal, dealing with insects, including but not limited to;
companion planting
beneficial insects
mulching
organic soap
sulfur
cayenne pepper
garlic
marigolds
nasturiums
tobacco and tumeric tea
boric acid
borax wash
vinegar
mineral oil
coffee grounds
coniferous needle tea
oleander
paprika
baking soda - sodium bicarbonate
rhubarb leaf tea
wood ash
eggshell flower

A lot of this is trial and error, but there is plenty of shared anecdotes and testimony to help you make a choice for yourself. I welcome new thoughts and ideas and opportunities to try them out.

I am using the least aggressive method in every case possible. I think the soap strategy is important regardless of the other options. It makes things work better and allows certain chemicals to remain on the plants longer.

I have not tried Neem yet, but would not discount it as a viable option.
Americans have the right and advantage of being armed - unlike the citizens of other countries whose governments are afraid to trust the people with arms.
James Madison

“The secret of happiness is freedom. The secret of freedom is courage.”
Thucydides (Ancient Greek historians and author, 460-404bc)

dhallftworth

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2009, 03:13:21 PM »
OK so if I use soap.. what kind of soap should I use? Dawn? I think I am a little late to start companion planting since I'm already in a war... which I will win!! My grandpa has used sevin dust forever and has told me to use it.. Will the soap take care of most of the insect that are considered pest? It's my first crop so I guess I'm being very protective..

Offline FreeSpirit

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2009, 03:40:01 PM »
OK so if I use soap.. what kind of soap should I use? Dawn? I think I am a little late to start companion planting since I'm already in a war... which I will win!! My grandpa has used sevin dust forever and has told me to use it.. Will the soap take care of most of the insect that are considered pest? It's my first crop so I guess I'm being very protective..

I know the feeling of being protective. Like other things, you may not need to overbear on your plant's livelihood. You should be able to find that balance and protect only when the signs indicate.  I know several people consider Sevin as safe. In some ways it is. My choice is to protect myself and my environment with intelligent decisions and cooperate with the intelligent design that has been handed to me in this life.

Organic insecticide soap is a good start. I really like castile soaps made with coconut fatty acids.  You can use dishwashing liquid with good results. I won't go into the composition of dish soap here. (Some things can be carried too far). You should be able to find it locally. If not, I can direct you to some mail order supply houses.  I like to make my own from vegetable fatty acid and lye (vegetable oil and wood ashes - for example).  You can use most household detergents with some success, I think dishwashing liquid is a good and easy route.

Dr. Bronner’s Liquid Peppermint Pure-Castile Soap diluted with water is a really good option in my mind and I have used it comfortably. Incidentally, the Amish told me that the use of Poho oil (a concentration of peppermint oils) was very helpful in controlling pests. I know for a fact that it worked on my daughter's ear infection problems. I was skeptical but entreatable. Those are some people that are extremely in touch with the land. I learned much from my (almost) 4 year exposure to their lifestyles.

Soap, as already stated, allows other chemicals to cling to the plant (generally the leaves) longer. It also disrupts the insect's cell membranes, usually by dehydration. This is the function of several of these remedies. DO NOT USE TOO MUCH SOAP. A little can go a long way. You do not want to kill your vegetation. Anything in improper doses can kill (too much water is a good example). BTW - soaps have been used for centuries.

A suggested recipe insecticide soap recipe (good starting point).
1 to 2 tablespoons liquid soap
1 quart water

Pesticide Soap Spray with the active ingredients added. There is plenty of testimony and history with these ingredients. I consider them the safest of my arsenal, yet effective.
The additives act as repellants. Using more than one ingredient has worked for me. There are probably synergies to discover here, but I do not have any hard data for you. Isolate them if you wish to experiment or mix freely to make an all purpose pesticide. The soap helps to make them cling to the plant.
onions
leeks
garlic
horseradish
ginger
rhubarb leaves
cayenne or other hot peppers

I usually boil water and create a concentrated poultice and add more water to get a fluid mix. I store this in a mason jar and seal it and place it in the sun. This brews and extracts the ingredients. I strain and add to the soap mixture and use spray bottles to apply my mix when needed. I use coffee filters to strain the poultice (with water added). This is more art than science for me, although I make careful observations to see how the garden reacts.

Depending on how you water, you may have to reapply often. Use care to water without splasing on leaves. Heavy composting will help prevent splasing on leaves. This will prevent fungus and other plant issues and diseases.  I consider composting and good soil structure to be the most important pesticides you can own.

Good luck with your efforts. Consider taking some of your Grandfather's advice and experience and incorporating some of your own. Weigh the pros and cons. Use a Ben Franklin chart to help you make these decisions.  Measure results and make decisions. Always try to the best you can for yourself. Once you have made good decisions for yourself, share it with others. The world will be a better place for your efforts. (This man's opinion)
Americans have the right and advantage of being armed - unlike the citizens of other countries whose governments are afraid to trust the people with arms.
James Madison

“The secret of happiness is freedom. The secret of freedom is courage.”
Thucydides (Ancient Greek historians and author, 460-404bc)

Offline ejsandstrom

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2009, 03:56:21 PM »


They dont do much for pests at all.
Of course freedom is not free, we work 4 months a year for it.

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dhallftworth

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2009, 03:58:05 PM »
+2 you are very insightful!!! I am going to give all of this a go on Sunday.... All of the different spices you mentioned, were there powdered or fresh? What about garlic powder? Will the soap or spices change the flavor of the crop??

Offline FreeSpirit

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2009, 04:24:21 PM »
.. All of the different spices you mentioned, were there powdered or fresh? What about garlic powder? Will the soap or spices change the flavor of the crop??

I like to use fresh garlic, but I also use the powder and cannot say with certainty that one works better than the other. The chemicals in both are most likely very similar, especially after boiling and brewing,

If you are going to eat the leaves of the plant, you may want to be choosier about what you spray on the leaf and consider the time to harvest as part of your plan.  I also use cocentrations that are strong enough to deter the problem. This is not always easy to detect, but you have to use a little wisdom and logic in your approaches. I wash everything I pick from the garden, in coconut soap(very dilute) and water and do not detect any overtones from my pesticide brews. On a side note - I like garlic and pepper ;D Best wishes to in your journey.
Americans have the right and advantage of being armed - unlike the citizens of other countries whose governments are afraid to trust the people with arms.
James Madison

“The secret of happiness is freedom. The secret of freedom is courage.”
Thucydides (Ancient Greek historians and author, 460-404bc)

dhallftworth

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2009, 04:28:51 PM »
On a side note - I like garlic and pepper ;D Best wishes to in your journey.
That's my favorite spices!!

Offline khristopher23

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #12 on: May 15, 2009, 05:44:02 PM »


They dont do much for pests at all.

That's the same seven dust I was thinking of when I clicked on this thread! Man I need to grow up.  ;D

Offline twk

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #13 on: May 15, 2009, 07:50:14 PM »
That's the same seven dust I was thinking of when I clicked on this thread! Man I need to grow up.  ;D

Are you kidding!  I wouldn't want to be a pest in the front row of their show!  I had a hard enough time not getting injured when I behaved! 
 ;D
"Loyalty to the country always.  Loyalty to the government when it deserves it."  Mark Twain

dhallftworth

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2009, 12:24:22 PM »
Can you still eat the leaves off of the plants that get dusted with Sevin Dust? Squash, green, okra, pretty much everything...

Offline chris

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2009, 12:51:17 PM »
btw - DDT got the bad rap for decimating bird populations,

DDT didn't affect bird populations at all. It was a lie pertetrated by the human hating enviro-tards.

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=1300.0

Scroll down about a third of the way and check out the links I posted.
Thank you for a constructive and positive contribution to the post!  I much rather see these types of responses than the negative, pessimistic posts of some other members.  - tankman1989


Offline CFG

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2009, 08:24:40 PM »
I stopped using sevin dust because it's so lethal to bees, like FreeSpirit said.  I've been using sulphur with some success in place of pesticides and it keeps fungus off the beans too.
If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much space.

calamityjane

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #17 on: June 19, 2009, 01:49:15 PM »
I stopped using sevin dust because it's so lethal to bees, like FreeSpirit said.  I've been using sulphur with some success in place of pesticides and it keeps fungus off the beans too.

To All,

I have been trying to move away from all forms of toxic chemicals that leach into the soil, and cause harm to animals, birds, bees, beneficials etc.,  In searching for organic or natural products for pest control, I've bumped into a few websites and will post the links below. 

On a personal note our little rescue mutt munched on a berry from a Lantana bush and nearly died.  Before that happened I was careful about putting out slug and snail killer that was not harmful to pets, but had truly never thought about toxic plants.  So, as we have seen and read about how toxic and nutrient poor our soil has become, I started to fold in garden practices that would fix a problem, build the soil, cause no harm, and leave it better than I found it.  (Hopefully).  With the collapse of the bee colonies around the world, I don't think we have any other choice but to make every effort to be their guardians, as without them, the food supply collapses too.  I'm not a fan of Frankenfood. 

So, with apologies for the long intro, here are a couple of links I'd like to share.

Arbico-Organics

(Organic solutions for home, garden & professional agriculture)
http://www.arbico-organics.com/

~free catalog~


Gardens Alive!
("Environmentally Reposible Products that Work"
http://www.gardensalive.com/default.asp?sid=147529&eid=051809GA&lm=gard&L1&bhcd2=1245436957

~free catalog~


BUGS 'R' DONE
http://www.safeinsecticide.com/index.html

(Safe around food, children, pets and fish)

Food-Grade Indoor and Outdoor
Bug Killer & Repellent
 
BUGS 'R' DONE™ is a highly effective environmentally safe indoor and outdoor insecticide containing pure orange peel oil, nature's own botanically-derived, insecticide. In combination with four other ingredients, all named by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration as 'GRAS,' Generally Regarded as Safe in human foods, BUGS 'R' DONE™ bears a warning free EPA-approved label in EPA's least hazardous category IV. ~snip~
Note: Bugs R Done website says the product is carried at most WHOLE FOOD stores.  I have contacted a local nursery here and asked if they might consider carrying it. 

Hope some of this info helps, and if you find a non-toxic product that has worked for you, please drop me a note if you think about it.  It would be most appreciated!

cj


Offline punkin

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #18 on: June 22, 2009, 05:09:50 PM »
Ive been very fortunate in not having much of a bug problem on my garden so far this year!

Offline Kilgor

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Re: Sevin Dust
« Reply #19 on: June 23, 2009, 07:15:58 AM »
Ive been very fortunate in not having much of a bug problem on my garden so far this year!

Me either.  Perhaps this companion planting thing is working...
Gardening and critter raising in the backyard.

http://www.backyardfreshfoods.com/