Author Topic: HAM Newbie  (Read 2652 times)

Offline 1960paco

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HAM Newbie
« on: November 14, 2015, 08:51:28 PM »
Just took the first class for the Technician class today with my dad it was really cool and i can't wait to take the test and start meeting other ants on the HAM  ;D going to find a good club to join too any tips fellow ants?

Offline Cedar

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Re: HAM Newbie
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2015, 10:52:59 PM »
Enjoy. Join nets.

Cedar

Offline Carl

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Re: HAM Newbie
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2015, 05:25:09 AM »
Great decision and a great hobby. I suggest you make Ham radio friends and down-play the 'survival' aspect as most
Hams believe in being ready and having emergency power etc...and most of all,they believe in SECURITY of the family unit.
The clues will surface as time passes and local club members answer your questions....remember that not ALL answers are correct.
Build a group of friends on the radio as Hams usually 'open up' to people as they become confident of your intentions COMMUNITY is
the strength of Ham radio as is the knowledge and skill of what the radio can do under ideal propagation conditions.

Ham radio has a reputation of 'getting the job done' and capability well beyond other radio services....yet the radio has NOTHING TO DO WITH IT! It is the tool used by the skilled Ham radio enthusiast....The people and community are the  reasons Hams are productive.
Ask advice and make decisions of what gear you use SLOWLY as gear is costly and used gear often is sold cheap for a reason,check
E HAM for gear as you can read the good and bad of equipment there and make educated decisions.

http://www.eham.net/reviews/

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: HAM Newbie
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2015, 06:15:59 AM »
After you pass the Tech test, maybe even while studying for it, learn what it takes to get on the air with local VHF/UHF repeaters and nets. Then do it ASAP.  This will get you into the active local community and give you some on-air experience fast.  From there, you can better figure out where you want to go next.

Look at joining a local club.  You'll get a lot of help and elmering there.

Sooner or later you'll end up with a $25 Baofeng handy-talkie.  Don't get hung up on learning to program it by hand.  Get an elmer to help you program it with CHIRP and move on to developing more important radio skills.

If the Tech material seems easy to you, consider studying for General and taking both at once.  It's a big bite to take, but you're in study mode already.  Don't worry about testing to Extra for now.  Some people test "zero to hero" in one sitting, but the Extra material won't make much sense without some on-air experience.  Or maybe a Tech license will give you everything you need, and there's no reason to go past that.

If you start thinking about upgrading to General, a shortwave radio that can receive SSB and a band plan chart will give you tons of motivation and hours of geeky fun.  Besides, we're all modern survivalists here, of course you need a good shortwave radio.

Good luck!

Offline SCWolverine

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Re: HAM Newbie
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2015, 08:01:59 AM »
You should spend some time with Me and the gang on the Fo Time Podcast!

http://amateurradio15.com/

Carl is the guest on #24  ;)

Offline armymars

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Re: HAM Newbie
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2015, 01:05:08 PM »
If you buy used, see if you can try it out first. If only at the owners house. At lest that way you will know it's not DOA. In almost every club there is at lest one person who has a high turn over of equipment because he keeps trying new things. Sometimes this is a great source radios. I bought my last radio this way. My friend traded some teaching material and dollars for a number of Ten-Tec radios from a Ten-Tec rep. The rep had been down sized out of the company and had all these radios. I saved about 100 dollars for my Argonaut. My friend  got to play with for or five different Ten-Tec's before he sold them.

Offline 1960paco

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Re: HAM Newbie
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2015, 02:24:04 PM »
First id like to point out that a legend like Cedar commented to something i posted so i feel really awesome now hahaha second thanks for all the great advice everyone i have a baofeng already and i plan on joining a club and getting involved as much as i can with it. Also im definitely gonna check out the podcasts SC!

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: HAM Newbie
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2015, 09:11:56 AM »

If the Tech material seems easy to you, consider studying for General and taking both at once.  It's a big bite to take, but you're in study mode already. 

I did that, but it was 9 months before I had a real HF station running.  I had plenty to learn on the VHF/UHF side of the hobby, but when I was ready my general license was already done.  Saved me $15 too, since the club charged a single fee no matter how many exams.

If you get your tech and get immersed with the hobby, it won't be long before your technician band privileges feel limiting.

Also, learn from the mistakes of others.  Learning what to avoid from observing fools can be just as valuable as observing the masters.  ;)

Offline Carl

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Re: HAM Newbie
« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2015, 12:01:17 PM »

Also, learn from the mistakes of others.  Learning what to avoid from observing fools can be just as valuable as observing the masters.  ;)

And a whole lot funnier...you are pretty smart SMURF.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: HAM Newbie
« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2015, 05:57:38 PM »
Thanks Carl.

For example - think of all you could learn if you met the guy who set this up: