Author Topic: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic  (Read 12372 times)

Offline rustyknife

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Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« on: May 21, 2009, 09:14:08 PM »
Talking to a rancher friend of mine last year he told me that while I was hunting on his property to go ahead and shot any crow or raven I stumbled into. When I asked him why he said that after the calves are born they fly in and peck out their eyes so they will bleed to death and die. after that they and others eat the remains. These birds also take care of other dead things but picking on a newborn calf gets them near the top of my list for varmite hunting.

Offline Heavy G

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2009, 09:24:37 PM »
I saw a crow peck a person's head.  They are evil.  Rats with wings. 

Guess what, though?  There is a season for hunting crows in Washington state.  What kind of crap is that?

Offline rustyknife

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2009, 09:27:43 PM »
There's one here in Oregon too however I just leave them lay for other things to utilize their remains

Offline “Mark”

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2009, 09:31:09 PM »
All members of the Corvidae family are highly intelligent. If they learn a trick (like what they were doing to the calves), they will remember it, and they will learn from watching other birds, too. They can also learn to talk, to count, etc.

Pecking a person's head is probably just a game to them. They're one of the few animals that will do dangerous things just for fun -- just like humans!

My advice is to kill them and leave their bodies around the cows. That lesson also sinks in.

Offline DeltaEchoVictor

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2009, 09:43:27 PM »
They are way smart & if you plan on hunting them watch for the lookout.  He'll usually come in first, so don't kill the first one you see.

Good camo is a must when hunting crows or ravens.

Offline theaccidentalsurvivor

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2009, 09:31:46 AM »
I saw a crow peck a person's head.  They are evil.  Rats with wings. 

Guess what, though?  There is a season for hunting crows in Washington state.  What kind of crap is that?

So does that mean you cant destroy their nests and eggs?

Offline Heavy G

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2009, 10:19:18 AM »
Dunno.

Offline Sister Wolf

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2009, 06:04:23 PM »
Crows and Ravens are, when looked at objectively, brilliant animals and we can learn a lot from them.  I studied them for an animal behavior class a few years ago, and fell in love.  I'm not saying they shouldn't be shot or any of that.  I'm just saying, they're neat.

For example...
New Caledonian Crows are known to be able to solve problems on the fly. They can learn new skills by trial and error. The (female) New Caledonian crow in the video below is shown trying to retrieve a bit of food from a little basket inside the tube. When she can't reach with just her beak she finds a tool. At first the wire she grabs doesn't do the job. She then bends it until it is the right shape for her to be able to pull the basket up. She learned this completely on her own when she could not reach the food in the usual way.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TtmLVP0HvDg&feature=player_embedded

Dirttime Dude

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2009, 06:07:06 PM »
 Ravens are way smarter than crows... And crows aint dumb...

 The Raven is considered one, not only one the top 3 smartest birds, but they are among the top of all critters.

 Ravens are a lot bigger than a crow. Ravens will gather in  numbers, but not like crows do, which can be in the hundreds.
 It is called a "murder of crows".... Ravens make a very large stick nest.

 The Raven can learn to talk and makes something 36 differnet sounds , a crow makes like 22 different sounds or thereabouts..
 Crows can learn to talk but not as easy a Raven.

 WE used to shoot the crows for 10cents each for the farmers... He had no idea that we would nail so many in one day , Back then 10 cents bought a coke , or a candy bar and or  a comic book, I could get in a movie for 15 cents... gas was 22 cents a gallon...etc... So the result was he limited our harvest to one day a week..  ;D

 Dude...coveryer6

Goatdog62

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2009, 07:54:36 PM »
I Like Ravens so much I named daughter 4 of 5 Raven




And my Harley






Wouldn't shoot either one. But if they started pecking at my head...

Offline TimSuggs

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #10 on: June 28, 2009, 06:32:24 PM »
Crows and Owls are natural enemy's and often fight to the death when they encounter one another.  Popular Southern crow hunting technique is to mount an owl decoy to a 10'/20' pole.  Attach several three pronged treble fishing hooks to each of the decoys ears.  Hoist pole up in yonder field and secure.  First crow that flys in and sees the owl and it's butt kicking time.  Crow dives at owl, gets hung on treble hooks, screams bloody murder until the sky turns black with more crows.  You can step out of the treeline and start firing away, they'll ignore you, all they want to do is KILL THAT OWL!

Tim.


Offline theaccidentalsurvivor

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #11 on: July 02, 2009, 03:28:33 PM »
Crows and Owls are natural enemy's and often fight to the death when they encounter one another.  Popular Southern crow hunting technique is to mount an owl decoy to a 10'/20' pole.  Attach several three pronged treble fishing hooks to each of the decoys ears.  Hoist pole up in yonder field and secure.  First crow that flys in and sees the owl and it's butt kicking time.  Crow dives at owl, gets hung on treble hooks, screams bloody murder until the sky turns black with more crows.  You can step out of the treeline and start firing away, they'll ignore you, all they want to do is KILL THAT OWL!

Tim.



Amazingly barbaric and awesome at the same time! I LOVE IT!

Offline TimSuggs

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2009, 05:33:26 PM »
Amazingly barbaric and awesome at the same time! I LOVE IT!

I've been referred to as just that, often, Accidentalsurvivor, THANKS!

Tim.

Offline UnderTheRadar

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #13 on: July 02, 2009, 06:35:34 PM »
Quote
Guess what, though?  There is a season for hunting crows in Washington state.  What kind of crap is that?

Heavy G,

Check to see if the regulations still allow year round crow hunting "in the act of predation".  They did a few years ago in Washington state.  That would allow you to nail them if they are near your garden or livestock.

UnderTheRadar

Offline JeanetteW

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #14 on: July 02, 2009, 06:38:58 PM »
I live very near a town called Crow. I think its called Crow because it is a nesting a breeding ground for our local species. Some times in the morning whne they are going o ut for the day, or in the evening when they are coming home to roost, the sky is black with them.

Persionally, I have never had a problem with crows. In fact, I think they are magical! They're full of fun and can teach you a lot - this from a girl who can spend hours watching her chickens!  :P

Hubby says they are my familiar animal http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Familiar_animal. I guess if you ever heard me calling to him in the field you would know why  ;)
 --
Jeanette

Goatdog62

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #15 on: July 02, 2009, 07:50:36 PM »

Hubby says they are my familiar animal http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Familiar_animal. I guess if you ever heard me calling to him in the field you would know why  ;)
 --
Jeanette

I think mine might be a goat.

Offline Dan

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #16 on: July 05, 2009, 04:48:37 PM »
Pecking a person's head is probably just a game to them. They're one of the few animals that will do dangerous things just for fun -- just like humans!

Sounds a lot like counting coup to me. For those that are not familiar with the practice http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counting_coup

A late friend had a bunch of fruit trees that were being raided by crows so what he did was shoot a few of them and put the bodies out were the others could see. He didn't have many problems with crows after he started doing that.

I live very near a town called Crow. I think its called Crow because it is a nesting a breeding ground for our local species.

Actually Crow was named after the community founders James and Helen Crow.

Btw, JeanetteW it's nice to see someone local on here. I'm in Eugene now but grew up in the Crow, Elmira, Cheshire area.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2009, 05:00:37 PM by Dan »

Offline Oil Lady

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #17 on: June 09, 2014, 04:22:26 AM »
Okay, so I simply had to read through this ancient thread and get my daily dose of geek.

And the wonderful contents of this thread prompted me to google for the differences between ravens and crows.




Here's my first google find: 

http://mag.audubon.org/articles/birds/how-tell-ravens-crow

[NOTE: This news item includes an AUDIO FILE with bird calls in it]

Quote

How to Tell a Raven From a Crow

by Frances Wood, with Dennis Paulsen; audio narrated by Michael Stein -- 10/22/2012

... These two species, common ravens and American crows, overlap widely throughout North America, and they look quite similar. But with a bit of practice, you can tell them apart.

You probably know that ravens are larger, the size of a red-tailed hawk. Ravens often travel in pairs, while crows are seen in larger groups. Also, watch the bird’s tail as it flies overhead. The crow’s tail feathers are basically the same length, so when the bird spreads its tail, it opens like a fan. Ravens, however, have longer middle feathers in their tails, so their tail appears wedge-shaped when open.

Listen closely to the birds’ calls. Crows give a cawing sound. But ravens produce a lower croaking sound....

 




And ... my second google find:

This is a real dinosaur of an AngelFire web page looking very much like it's from pre-2000. It also appears that it once had a lot of gif files for illustration, but the links are all broken now.

http://www.angelfire.com/id/ravensknowledge/ravensvscrows.html

I love the book quotes found at the top where the owner of the AngelFire page quoted truly profound and even poetic one-line observations about crows and ravens made by experts in the field.   But I'm going to concentrate on the geeky stuff:

Quote
Physical Differences: Crows average around 17 inches long, and ravens about 24-27.

-- A raven weighs about four times that of a crow.
-- Crows have a wing span around 2.5 ft., and ravens about 3.5-4 ft.
     >> A raven's wing sometimes makes a prominent "swish, swish" sound, while
           a crow's wingbeat is usually silent.
-- Ravens have pointed wings, while crows have a more blunt and splayed wing tip.
-- Crows have a fan-shaped tail (squared-off), while raven tails are long and wedge-shaped.
-- Besides having a bigger, more powerful bill, a raven's bill is curved, while a crow has a more-or-less flat bill.
-- Additionally, atop a raven's bill is a tuft of hairs absent on crows.
     >> As a result of being larger and more powerful, ravens are the more efficient
           predator. (Predation is a very small percentage of crow and raven diets.)







And some images. 







Offline Cedar

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Re: Ravens and crows, caution: graphic
« Reply #18 on: June 09, 2014, 07:24:11 AM »
Baby crows have gold eyes and baby ravens have blue eyes. Ravens have a larger more curved beak and crows do not. We have alot of ravens here in the area we live. Their voices are different too.

Both can be taught to speak. I knew one named "Clem" at the school science department I went to for awhile.

West Nile has killed off about 45% of crows in the United States within recent years. They get it and die within a week. Usually none recover from the disease. I presume it would be about the same for ravens.

Cedar